Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • March 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 3
    By Eric H. Espensen, DPM
    26,813 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
          Diabetic wounds are a common occurrence in wound care centers and private practice. With the escalating rate of diabetes, more and more patients are developing wounds that require care. Wound care for diabetic wounds routinely includes debridement. The term debridement comes from the French desbrider, meaning “to unbridle,” and was probably first used as a medical term by surgeons working in war zones. The medical personnel and surgeons likely recognized that contaminated wounds had a better chance of healing if one surgically removed the damaged tissue to revea ... continue reading
    By Jarrett D. Cain, DPM, and Vickie R. Driver, DPM, MS
    13,819 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
          Patients with diabetes can be a quite an undertaking for any physician who manages them on a consistent basis. In the past, this has created reservations when it comes to managing these patients especially from a surgical standpoint. However, over the years, with greater understanding of the disease, improvements in surgical techniques and emerging research, the reservations have diminished and the role of surgical management is a viable option when it comes to successfully treating those with diabetic ulcerations, infections and other related complications that exist in t ... continue reading
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    69,295 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
          Hallux limitus, by definition, is a decrease in sagittal plane dorsiflexion of the hallux at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) when the foot is in a weightbearing or simulated weightbearing position. With this in mind, let us take a closer look at the treatment approaches to this condition.       Normal range of dorsiflexion motion of the first MPJ should be 65 to 75 degrees in order to allow for a normal gait. Near the end of the propulsive phase of gait, the leg has a 45-degree position to the floor and the ankle is in about 20 degrees of plant ... continue reading
    By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Mark A. Kachan, DPM; By Warren S. Joseph, DPM, FIDSA
    12,101 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
          Yes. By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Mark A. Kachan, DPM. Given the increasing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, one should consider empiric coverage against MRSA in high-risk patients with infected ulcerations in the lower extremity.       The most common pathogens in nosocomial skin and skin structure infections in the United States and Canada in 2000 were Staph aureus. Researchers have stated that approximately 30 to 60 percent of all Staph aureus isolates are methicillin-resistant Staph aureus (MR ... continue reading
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    By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor
    15,765 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
          Facilitating the healing of nonunion fractures can be challenging. In order to address this challenge, a number of practitioners have been turning to the DonJoy OL1000 Bone Growth Stimulator as it reportedly provides an easy to use, noninvasive treatment option.       The bone growth stimulator is a lightweight, battery-powered device that can accommodate a large variety of fracture sites, according to DJO Inc., the manufacturer of the device. While the bone growth stimulator is specifically indicated for the treatment of established nonunion fractures s ... continue reading
    By Rachel Grieder, DPM, Sean McMurray, DPM, and Matthew J. Claxton, DPM
    12,432 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
          The neuropathic foot presents unique challenges when treating and preventing chronic wounds. One of the most difficult challenges is offloading the neuropathic foot without compromising function or causing a transfer of pressure that leads to further ulceration. When performing a limb salvage procedure, the goal is to provide the patient with a stable, plantargrade foot while still allowing for ambulation.1       In choosing the appropriate procedure to offload the foot, it is important to consider minimal bone resection versus a partial pedal ... continue reading

    3,868 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/07
    Picturing Wounds Accurately      As wounds progress through different stages of healing, it is important to have an accurate method of tracking their progress.      With the new PictZar® medical software program, one would take a digital photo and load that photo and a ruler into the computer, according to Medline Industries, the manufacturer of the software program. The company says the product then accurately calibrates to the ruler and measures the wound’s length, width, circumference and area.      Medline says ... continue reading