Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • March 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 3
    By William N. McCann, DPM
    22,990 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          The use of durable medical equipment (DME) has grown to become a part of almost every podiatric practice over the last half-century. In fact, podiatrists have led the field in this important area of patient treatment through our use of orthotic devices.       With our extensive background and training in biomechanics, our understanding of diabetes and its complications in the lower extremities as well as a need to provide patients with immediate immobilization, it is no wonder that DME is one of the more important offerings that we can extend to those we... continue reading
    Surgeons may find success with the Weinert modification of the Akin osteotomy, which the authors believe promotes a more stable fixation with fewer complications and risks.
    By Anthony Weinert, DPM, Ali Elkhalil, DPM, and Ahmad Farah, DPM
    7,580 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          Practitioners have described various osteotomies for the proximal hallux. However, the Akin closing wedge osteotomy is currently the most common procedure. Podiatric surgeons commonly employ the transverse plane closing wedge osteotomy for the correction of hallux abductus interphalangous deformity. One may also use this as an additional procedure for the correction of hallux abductovalgus deformity.       Akin noted that one should perform the closing base wedge osteotomy at the proximal one-third of the proximal hallux and orient it in the transverse p... continue reading
    Note the distal fifth digit eschar, which is dry, stable and well attached with no signs of active infection.
    By Eric H. Espensen, DPM
    25,703 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          Diabetic wounds are a common occurrence in wound care centers and private practice. With the escalating rate of diabetes, more and more patients are developing wounds that require care. Wound care for diabetic wounds routinely includes debridement. The term debridement comes from the French desbrider, meaning “to unbridle,” and was probably first used as a medical term by surgeons working in war zones. The medical personnel and surgeons likely recognized that contaminated wounds had a better chance of healing if one surgically removed the damaged tissue to revea... continue reading
    By Jarrett D. Cain, DPM, and Vickie R. Driver, DPM, MS
    13,352 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          Patients with diabetes can be a quite an undertaking for any physician who manages them on a consistent basis. In the past, this has created reservations when it comes to managing these patients especially from a surgical standpoint. However, over the years, with greater understanding of the disease, improvements in surgical techniques and emerging research, the reservations have diminished and the role of surgical management is a viable option when it comes to successfully treating those with diabetic ulcerations, infections and other related complications that exist in t... continue reading
    Removal of the dorsal hypertrophic bone of the first metatarsal is a commonly used procedure in the treatment of hallux limitus. This photo depicts the pre-cheilectomy range of motion.
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    65,668 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          Hallux limitus, by definition, is a decrease in sagittal plane dorsiflexion of the hallux at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) when the foot is in a weightbearing or simulated weightbearing position. With this in mind, let us take a closer look at the treatment approaches to this condition.       Normal range of dorsiflexion motion of the first MPJ should be 65 to 75 degrees in order to allow for a normal gait. Near the end of the propulsive phase of gait, the leg has a 45-degree position to the floor and the ankle is in about 20 degrees of plant... continue reading
    By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Mark A. Kachan, DPM; By Warren S. Joseph, DPM, FIDSA
    11,437 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          Yes. By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Mark A. Kachan, DPM. Given the increasing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, one should consider empiric coverage against MRSA in high-risk patients with infected ulcerations in the lower extremity.       The most common pathogens in nosocomial skin and skin structure infections in the United States and Canada in 2000 were Staph aureus. Researchers have stated that approximately 30 to 60 percent of all Staph aureus isolates are methicillin-resistant Staph aureus (MR... continue reading
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    Pre-clinical studies have shown the DonJoy OL1000 Bone Growth Stimulator is effective in stimulating the healing of nonunion fractures, according to the manufacturer DJO.
    By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor
    14,649 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          Facilitating the healing of nonunion fractures can be challenging. In order to address this challenge, a number of practitioners have been turning to the DonJoy OL1000 Bone Growth Stimulator as it reportedly provides an easy to use, noninvasive treatment option.       The bone growth stimulator is a lightweight, battery-powered device that can accommodate a large variety of fracture sites, according to DJO Inc., the manufacturer of the device. While the bone growth stimulator is specifically indicated for the treatment of established nonunion fractures s... continue reading