Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 3
    By Thomas Cusumano, DPM
    24,814 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Hallux limitus/rigidus is defined as a degenerative arthrosis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) which is characterized by a decrease in the MTPJ range of motion and an eventual lack of motion.1 Treatment for this condition is a frequently discussed topic at podiatric conferences. When it comes to the stages of osteoarthritis in the MTPJ, one may consider performing joint preservation or joint destructive procedures. Joint preservation procedures include cheilectomy procedures, soft tissue correction and distal/proximal osteotomies as indicated for osseous correction. Wi ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    11,097 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    In a follow-up to the last Q&A column on preventing post-op wounds (see page 16, January issue), our expert panelists have reconvened to discuss the treatment of post-op wounds. They explore treatment approaches to a variety of wounds, ranging from the post-op dehiscence and infected wounds to exposed internal fixation and fracture blisters. Without further delay, here are their thoughts. Q: How do you typically manage the post-op wound dehiscence? What types of wound products do you suggest? A: Ronald G. Ray, DPM, PT, says you should first remove any loose suture material and debr ... continue reading
    By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, and Peter M. Wilusz, DPM
    13,873 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Many sources in the literature describe the presence of pedal deformity and recurrent ulcerations associated with diabetes mellitus.1-4 Establishing a multidisciplinary team of physicians is essential for avoiding complications among these patients with diabetes.5,6 Unfortunately, the pedorthotist/orthotist is a frequently underutilized member of this team. Indeed, certified CPeds can make the difference between success and failure of diabetic limb salvage and ulcer prevention. Certainly, the importance and impact of diabetic footwear cannot be ignored as a key componen ... continue reading
    By Katherine Holtz-Neiderer, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc
    5,855 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Repetitive stress is a major contributing factor to the rise of most foot problems. In the high-risk diabetic foot clinics at the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the most common of these severe complications is the diabetic foot wound. The prime etiology of diabetic foot ulcers is the combination of neuropathy and repetitive moderate stress (walking). Diabetic foot wounds often lead to a host of other maladies including sepsis, amputation and premature death. It has also been shown that people undergoing amputation have higher healthcare costs.1,2 When it comes ... continue reading