Volume 15 - Issue 5 - May 2002

Surgical Pearls »

How To Test And Treat Exertional Compartment Syndrome

By Richard Braver, DPM | 41389 reads | 2 comments

When patients experience intense pain, a burning sensation, tightness and/or numbness in the lower extremities during exercise activity, and the pain usually resolves quickly once the patients stop the activity, you may be looking at exertional compartment syndrome (ECS). ECS is certainly one of the more confounding conditions as differentiating between the various leg pains can be difficult.
Parasthesia to the anterior leg, ankle or between the first and second metatarsal is indicative of anterior leg compartment involvement. In addition, weakness of ankle dorsiflexion or a drop foot also in



Wound Care Q&A »

How To Treat Severe Post-Op Pain

17026 reads | 0 comments

Many patients with non-healing ulcers are already in significant pain prior to surgery. Many of these patients will require escalating doses of pain medications following surgical debridement and grafting. Some will already have developed tolerances to pain medications. So, what do we prescribe to control their pain? More importantly, what can we prescribe and still maintain a level of comfort in writing the prescription?
With these questions in mind, Robert Snyder, DPM, engaged in a Q&A session with Andrew J. Goldberg, MD, the Director of the Northwest Pain Management Center in Margate, Fla



Technology In Practice »

AmeriGel: An Alternative To Soaking?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 9073 reads | 0 comments

Why aren’t more DPMs using the AmeriGel Wound Dressing for post-matrixectomies? After all, it is a product that reportedly promotes faster healing and, as a no-soak alternative, facilitates higher patient compliance. Well, it turns out that people are catching on to the benefits of the AmeriGel Wound Dressing. According to the manufacturer AmerX Health Care, over 1,000 podiatrists are using the product to treat their patients.
“AmeriGel has worked well for most of my patients,” says Gerald Travers, DPM. “AmeriGel seems to speed the post-op recovery and reduce the tenderness involved w



Editor's Perspective »

Are Ankle Implants On The Comeback Trail?

By Jeff Hall, Editor | 3430 reads | 0 comments

Older ankle implants, initially used in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, were failures. They either popped out, wore out or subsided into the bone. One podiatric surgeon recalls removing at least one failed ankle implant a week during his residency. Lately, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in ankle implants, although a palpable amount of trepidation and skepticism remains.
While only a handful of podiatric surgeons in the United States have used the newer implants (the Agility Ankle and the Beuchel-Pappas device), the majority believe they are more biocompatible. They are rep



New Products »

A Sharp Assessment

3518 reads | 0 comments

Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy?
If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament.
According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha



Feature »

Current Trends In Antifungal Therapy

Panelists: Warren Joseph, DPM, Aditya Gupta, MD, PhD, Benjamin Overley, DPM, Richard Pollak, DPM and Jack Rubinlicht, DPM | 20084 reads | 0 comments

Should you use a topical, an oral therapy or a combination of both? This is one of many questions that came up during an intriguing discussion of antifungals. Drawing upon their clinical experience, the panelists discuss their approaches to treating tinea pedis and onychomycosis, indications and contraindications for oral drugs, and other important aspects of prescribing appropriate, effective therapy.

Q: What do you use to treat different presentations of tinea pedis, including moccasin variety, acute vesicular and dermatophytosis complex (severe interdigital tinea)?
Warren Joseph,



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