Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    By Anthony Yung, DPM
    9,990 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    At least 30 percent of patients with diabetes will develop cutaneous manifestations in their lifetime.1 Given that diabetes is a systemic disease, its effects on the skin may arise from many different sources (vascular, metabolic, nutritional disturbances, infectious agents and medications). Several common skin disorders may be associated with diabetes. These include necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, granuloma annulare, diabetic bullae, diabetic dermopathy, limited joint mobility and yellow skin phenomenon. While the exact causes of most pathologic skin changes are unknown, a majority of t... continue reading

    17,505 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Many patients with non-healing ulcers are already in significant pain prior to surgery. Many of these patients will require escalating doses of pain medications following surgical debridement and grafting. Some will already have developed tolerances to pain medications. So, what do we prescribe to control their pain? More importantly, what can we prescribe and still maintain a level of comfort in writing the prescription? With these questions in mind, Robert Snyder, DPM, engaged in a Q&A session with Andrew J. Goldberg, MD, the Director of the Northwest Pain Management Center in Margate, Fla... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    33,054 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Lateral foot pain may be associated with problems of the lateral or medial foot. Often, if there is a problem on the medial aspect of the foot, your patient may also note that he or she has had long-term pain on the lateral aspect of the foot and ankle. Here is a common finding I see in my practice that may help you diagnose and treat lateral foot pain. A 58-year-old female has chronic pain in the lateral aspect of her right foot. She has had the pain for six months and says it has been getting worse in the past one to two months. She recently increased her level of activity with more charity... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    9,854 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Why aren’t more DPMs using the AmeriGel Wound Dressing for post-matrixectomies? After all, it is a product that reportedly promotes faster healing and, as a no-soak alternative, facilitates higher patient compliance. Well, it turns out that people are catching on to the benefits of the AmeriGel Wound Dressing. According to the manufacturer AmerX Health Care, over 1,000 podiatrists are using the product to treat their patients. “AmeriGel has worked well for most of my patients,” says Gerald Travers, DPM. “AmeriGel seems to speed the post-op recovery and reduce the tenderness involved w... continue reading
    By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS, Hal Ornstein, DPM, and Lynn Homisak, PMAC
    8,674 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Is there a particular patient or two you dread seeing in your office? If a vote took place among physicians as to what kind of patient provokes the most distress in healthcare providers, we would bet many providers would answer “patients who fail to comply.” In fact, providers often react with anger and frustration when patients ignore their professional recommendations. Aside from the potential legal ramifications, a patient’s lack of compliance often triggers feelings that our professional opinion is devalued and may even cause us to begin to question our own self-worth. When our own... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor
    3,559 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Older ankle implants, initially used in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, were failures. They either popped out, wore out or subsided into the bone. One podiatric surgeon recalls removing at least one failed ankle implant a week during his residency. Lately, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in ankle implants, although a palpable amount of trepidation and skepticism remains. While only a handful of podiatric surgeons in the United States have used the newer implants (the Agility Ankle and the Beuchel-Pappas device), the majority believe they are more biocompatible. They are rep... continue reading
    
According to Dr. Barrett (shown at right), more than 500,000 EPF procedures have been performed since the procedure received FDA approval in 1992.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    43,422 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Prior to the development of the first endoscopic foot surgery, there was a strong desire not only to find a better, less invasive method to treat recalcitrant mechanical plantar fasciitis surgically but also to develop a more universally consistent surgical approach to what has been labeled an “endemic problem.” Indeed, the standard of care regarding the surgical management of the heel pain has radically changed since the introduction of the endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). In 1990, there was an almost universal perception within the podiatric community that the spur was the primary c... continue reading

    3,730 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy? If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha... continue reading
    By Megan Lawton
    4,424 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I have always loved sports and knew I wanted to be able to treat athletes’ anomalies medically. I participated in many sports up through college. Whether I was playing volleyball, fastpitch games or doing a triathlon, I found that athlete anomalies typically involved the foot and ankle. I found the podiatry profession fit my life. Not only could I treat athletes and others, I could incorporate surgery into some treatments. After I decided to pursue podiatry as a career, I started thinking about my future. I’m not alone. As the podiatric profession continues to evolve, students often wond... continue reading
    Here you can see exposure of the periosteum overlying the distal medial tibia. The author says you should avoid inadvertent posterior dissection.
    By Jesse Burks, DPM, MS
    9,500 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Numerous primary and revisional surgical procedures mandate using either osseous autografts or allografts. Although allografts continue to increase in popularity, most podiatric surgeons will agree that autografts offer distinct advantages in healing and are preferable when possible. In comparison to autogenous grafts, allografts help facilitate an absence of donor site morbidity, unlimited supply and decreased surgical time. However, autografts provide numerous benefits such as host compatibility, viable precursor cells and superior immunologic properties.1,2 As with any surgical procedure... continue reading