Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,511 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    What is the best treatment approach for seniors who have painful arthritis in the first MPJ? Arthrodesis may provide significant pain relief for these patients, according to the results of a recent 29-patient study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). A retrospective analysis revealed that 100 percent of 19 patients who responded to a survey said they were satisfied with the results of the arthrodesis, which involves fusing arthritic bones to inhibit motion and eliminate the arthritis. These patients also noted they would undergo the proc... continue reading
    Panelists: Warren Joseph, DPM, Aditya Gupta, MD, PhD, Benjamin Overley, DPM, Richard Pollak, DPM and Jack Rubinlicht, DPM
    21,380 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Should you use a topical, an oral therapy or a combination of both? This is one of many questions that came up during an intriguing discussion of antifungals. Drawing upon their clinical experience, the panelists discuss their approaches to treating tinea pedis and onychomycosis, indications and contraindications for oral drugs, and other important aspects of prescribing appropriate, effective therapy. Q: What do you use to treat different presentations of tinea pedis, including moccasin variety, acute vesicular and dermatophytosis complex (severe interdigital tinea)? Warren Joseph,... continue reading
    When testing the deep posterior compartment with the Stryker intra-compartmental pressure monitor system, insert the needle just medial and posterior, staying relatively superficial within the posterior tibial muscle belly.
    By Richard Braver, DPM
    44,052 reads | 2 comments | 09/03/08
    When patients experience intense pain, a burning sensation, tightness and/or numbness in the lower extremities during exercise activity, and the pain usually resolves quickly once the patients stop the activity, you may be looking at exertional compartment syndrome (ECS). ECS is certainly one of the more confounding conditions as differentiating between the various leg pains can be difficult. Parasthesia to the anterior leg, ankle or between the first and second metatarsal is indicative of anterior leg compartment involvement. In addition, weakness of ankle dorsiflexion or a drop foot also in... continue reading
    By Anthony Yung, DPM
    10,077 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    At least 30 percent of patients with diabetes will develop cutaneous manifestations in their lifetime.1 Given that diabetes is a systemic disease, its effects on the skin may arise from many different sources (vascular, metabolic, nutritional disturbances, infectious agents and medications). Several common skin disorders may be associated with diabetes. These include necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, granuloma annulare, diabetic bullae, diabetic dermopathy, limited joint mobility and yellow skin phenomenon. While the exact causes of most pathologic skin changes are unknown, a majority of t... continue reading

    17,624 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Many patients with non-healing ulcers are already in significant pain prior to surgery. Many of these patients will require escalating doses of pain medications following surgical debridement and grafting. Some will already have developed tolerances to pain medications. So, what do we prescribe to control their pain? More importantly, what can we prescribe and still maintain a level of comfort in writing the prescription? With these questions in mind, Robert Snyder, DPM, engaged in a Q&A session with Andrew J. Goldberg, MD, the Director of the Northwest Pain Management Center in Margate, Fla... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    33,426 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Lateral foot pain may be associated with problems of the lateral or medial foot. Often, if there is a problem on the medial aspect of the foot, your patient may also note that he or she has had long-term pain on the lateral aspect of the foot and ankle. Here is a common finding I see in my practice that may help you diagnose and treat lateral foot pain. A 58-year-old female has chronic pain in the lateral aspect of her right foot. She has had the pain for six months and says it has been getting worse in the past one to two months. She recently increased her level of activity with more charity... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    10,063 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Why aren’t more DPMs using the AmeriGel Wound Dressing for post-matrixectomies? After all, it is a product that reportedly promotes faster healing and, as a no-soak alternative, facilitates higher patient compliance. Well, it turns out that people are catching on to the benefits of the AmeriGel Wound Dressing. According to the manufacturer AmerX Health Care, over 1,000 podiatrists are using the product to treat their patients. “AmeriGel has worked well for most of my patients,” says Gerald Travers, DPM. “AmeriGel seems to speed the post-op recovery and reduce the tenderness involved w... continue reading
    By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS, Hal Ornstein, DPM, and Lynn Homisak, PMAC
    8,817 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Is there a particular patient or two you dread seeing in your office? If a vote took place among physicians as to what kind of patient provokes the most distress in healthcare providers, we would bet many providers would answer “patients who fail to comply.” In fact, providers often react with anger and frustration when patients ignore their professional recommendations. Aside from the potential legal ramifications, a patient’s lack of compliance often triggers feelings that our professional opinion is devalued and may even cause us to begin to question our own self-worth. When our own... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor
    3,617 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Older ankle implants, initially used in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, were failures. They either popped out, wore out or subsided into the bone. One podiatric surgeon recalls removing at least one failed ankle implant a week during his residency. Lately, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in ankle implants, although a palpable amount of trepidation and skepticism remains. While only a handful of podiatric surgeons in the United States have used the newer implants (the Agility Ankle and the Beuchel-Pappas device), the majority believe they are more biocompatible. They are rep... continue reading
    
According to Dr. Barrett (shown at right), more than 500,000 EPF procedures have been performed since the procedure received FDA approval in 1992.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    43,942 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Prior to the development of the first endoscopic foot surgery, there was a strong desire not only to find a better, less invasive method to treat recalcitrant mechanical plantar fasciitis surgically but also to develop a more universally consistent surgical approach to what has been labeled an “endemic problem.” Indeed, the standard of care regarding the surgical management of the heel pain has radically changed since the introduction of the endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). In 1990, there was an almost universal perception within the podiatric community that the spur was the primary c... continue reading