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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    
According to Dr. Barrett (shown at right), more than 500,000 EPF procedures have been performed since the procedure received FDA approval in 1992.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    44,417 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Prior to the development of the first endoscopic foot surgery, there was a strong desire not only to find a better, less invasive method to treat recalcitrant mechanical plantar fasciitis surgically but also to develop a more universally consistent surgical approach to what has been labeled an “endemic problem.” Indeed, the standard of care regarding the surgical management of the heel pain has radically changed since the introduction of the endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). In 1990, there was an almost universal perception within the podiatric community that the spur was the primary c... continue reading

    3,817 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy? If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha ... continue reading
    By Megan Lawton
    4,540 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    I have always loved sports and knew I wanted to be able to treat athletes’ anomalies medically. I participated in many sports up through college. Whether I was playing volleyball, fastpitch games or doing a triathlon, I found that athlete anomalies typically involved the foot and ankle. I found the podiatry profession fit my life. Not only could I treat athletes and others, I could incorporate surgery into some treatments. After I decided to pursue podiatry as a career, I started thinking about my future. I’m not alone. As the podiatric profession continues to evolve, students often wond... continue reading
    Here you can see exposure of the periosteum overlying the distal medial tibia. The author says you should avoid inadvertent posterior dissection.
    By Jesse Burks, DPM, MS
    9,845 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Numerous primary and revisional surgical procedures mandate using either osseous autografts or allografts. Although allografts continue to increase in popularity, most podiatric surgeons will agree that autografts offer distinct advantages in healing and are preferable when possible. In comparison to autogenous grafts, allografts help facilitate an absence of donor site morbidity, unlimited supply and decreased surgical time. However, autografts provide numerous benefits such as host compatibility, viable precursor cells and superior immunologic properties.1,2 As with any surgical procedure... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,588 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    What is the best treatment approach for seniors who have painful arthritis in the first MPJ? Arthrodesis may provide significant pain relief for these patients, according to the results of a recent 29-patient study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). A retrospective analysis revealed that 100 percent of 19 patients who responded to a survey said they were satisfied with the results of the arthrodesis, which involves fusing arthritic bones to inhibit motion and eliminate the arthritis. These patients also noted they would undergo the proc... continue reading
    Panelists: Warren Joseph, DPM, Aditya Gupta, MD, PhD, Benjamin Overley, DPM, Richard Pollak, DPM and Jack Rubinlicht, DPM
    21,639 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Should you use a topical, an oral therapy or a combination of both? This is one of many questions that came up during an intriguing discussion of antifungals. Drawing upon their clinical experience, the panelists discuss their approaches to treating tinea pedis and onychomycosis, indications and contraindications for oral drugs, and other important aspects of prescribing appropriate, effective therapy. Q: What do you use to treat different presentations of tinea pedis, including moccasin variety, acute vesicular and dermatophytosis complex (severe interdigital tinea)? Warren Joseph,... continue reading
    When testing the deep posterior compartment with the Stryker intra-compartmental pressure monitor system, insert the needle just medial and posterior, staying relatively superficial within the posterior tibial muscle belly.
    By Richard Braver, DPM
    44,569 reads | 2 comments | 05/03/02
    When patients experience intense pain, a burning sensation, tightness and/or numbness in the lower extremities during exercise activity, and the pain usually resolves quickly once the patients stop the activity, you may be looking at exertional compartment syndrome (ECS). ECS is certainly one of the more confounding conditions as differentiating between the various leg pains can be difficult. Parasthesia to the anterior leg, ankle or between the first and second metatarsal is indicative of anterior leg compartment involvement. In addition, weakness of ankle dorsiflexion or a drop foot also in... continue reading
    By Anthony Yung, DPM
    10,142 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    At least 30 percent of patients with diabetes will develop cutaneous manifestations in their lifetime.1 Given that diabetes is a systemic disease, its effects on the skin may arise from many different sources (vascular, metabolic, nutritional disturbances, infectious agents and medications). Several common skin disorders may be associated with diabetes. These include necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, granuloma annulare, diabetic bullae, diabetic dermopathy, limited joint mobility and yellow skin phenomenon. While the exact causes of most pathologic skin changes are unknown, a majority of t... continue reading

    17,713 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Many patients with non-healing ulcers are already in significant pain prior to surgery. Many of these patients will require escalating doses of pain medications following surgical debridement and grafting. Some will already have developed tolerances to pain medications. So, what do we prescribe to control their pain? More importantly, what can we prescribe and still maintain a level of comfort in writing the prescription? With these questions in mind, Robert Snyder, DPM, engaged in a Q&A session with Andrew J. Goldberg, MD, the Director of the Northwest Pain Management Center in Margate, Fla... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    33,699 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Lateral foot pain may be associated with problems of the lateral or medial foot. Often, if there is a problem on the medial aspect of the foot, your patient may also note that he or she has had long-term pain on the lateral aspect of the foot and ankle. Here is a common finding I see in my practice that may help you diagnose and treat lateral foot pain. A 58-year-old female has chronic pain in the lateral aspect of her right foot. She has had the pain for six months and says it has been getting worse in the past one to two months. She recently increased her level of activity with more charity... continue reading