Practice Builders

By Christopher R. Jarvis, MBA and David B. Mandell, JD, MBA
4,654 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2004

Over the past few years, we have written many articles on potential strategies that podiatrists can use to reduce income taxes, increase benefits or build retirement savings. Unfortunately, these consultations often turn out to be less than fruitful because of office politics. While the younger members of a podiatry group are often very motivated to reduce their income taxes, the older, more established doctors are often uninterested. Either they are already so close to retirement that they don’t need extra retirement planning or they are simply set in their ways and don’t want to chang

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By David E. Marcinko, MBA, CFP
16,954 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2003

Professional malpractice liability insurance protection is a major fixed operational expense in any at-risk medical practice. In most practices, liability insurance costs often represent one of the largest single line item expenses, often falling second only to staff payroll expenses. To contain these liability overhead expense costs, the physician-executive should understand the dynamics of the insurance industry selling process, which is generally sold through one of three agency avenues: • direct insurance agents serving as employees of a single insurance company; • captive insuranc

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By Jonathan Moore, DPM, MS and Kimberly Moore, OTR
38,122 reads | 3 comments | 10/03/2003

If you as a podiatric physician have not established yourself as the expert of the diabetic foot within your area, now is the time. There is no reason why you shouldn’t be the “go to” guy or gal in your community when it comes to treating, managing and preventing diabetes-related lower extremity complications. Managing the diabetic foot is all about a team approach and establishing yourself as the quarterback will not only improve the quality of care for your patients but it can also greatly enhance your business. The podiatric literature is replete with dozens of studies demonstrating

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By Chris Vance, DPM
12,547 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2003

In over 25 years of practice, I have witnessed the importance of recognizing patient learning styles. As a physician and now as a practice consultant, I have found that communication is of strategic importance. As physicians, we must educate our patients first through effective communication. Only then will our patients understand their condition and agree to our recommended course of treatment. “If teachers teach exclusively in a manner that favors the students’ less preferred learning style, the students’ discomfort level can interfere with their ability to learn and memorize,” not

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By Billie C. Bradford, MBA
22,199 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2003

It happens every year. All healthcare professionals have learned to anticipate annual changes in Medicare regulations, coding and reimbursement. However, this year’s delays and payment uncertainties definitely qualify 2003 as one of the worst years yet for physicians trying to do some financial planning for their practices. For starters, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its 2003 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule and Final Rule on Dec. 31, 2002, two months behind schedule. As a result of that delay, the payment rates for 2003 were amended to take effect on March 1,

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By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA
6,603 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2003

More often than not, we feel like we’re doing the managed care company a favor by applying. There’s also a tendency to believe the process is so cut and dry that we can apply at the last minute. Let’s clear up these misconceptions. If you don’t apply and apply properly, someone else will. Secondly, as our mothers use to tell us, haste makes waste. Indeed, simple mistakes can slow the process down to a snail’s pace and/or cause the company to reject your application. First, I strongly recommend filling out the application yourself. Often, the application will ask for information that

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By Chris E. Vance, DPM
7,813 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2003

Predictably, the most sought after and most efficient medical practices have a common denominator: the ability to educate and communicate in a timely and effective manner. Patients do not come to us for our ability to make a buttress pad or apply an Unna boot. They come to us for our diagnostic ability and to be effectively educated on their condition and the available treatment options. As an educator, you are viewed as the authority and the relater of valuable information. Patients will retain information differently but all learn by different methods: verbal, tactile, visual or auditory. M

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