Orthotics Q&A

Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
84,600 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2003

At this time of year, many people begin to run on treadmills after receiving them as holiday presents and some seek to lose weight during the winter months. However, treadmill use increases the amount of repetition, possibly leading to biomechanical injury and potentially complicating common conditions like plantar fasciitis. With that in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the finer points of diagnosing and treating injuries sustained by patients while using treadmills. Q: What are the most important biomechanical considerations? A: Exercising on treadmills exacerbates the i

| Continue reading
Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM
44,284 reads | 1 comments | 10/03/2003

When weighing the options for ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), you must consider many different factors in order to find the most appropriate device for the patient. Both hinged and non-hinged AFOs work well for patients with certain conditions but not so well for others. In addition, shoe modifications may be necessary in order to help ensure the success of the AFO. With these issues in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the ins and outs of prescribing hinged and non-hinged AFOs. Q: What are the three or four most frequent diagnoses for which you prescribe a non-hinged AFO? A: N

| Continue reading
Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM
27,382 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2003

When treating pediatric soccer players, you may see common conditions such as calcaneal apophysitis and injuries such as lateral ankle sprains. Prescribing orthotics for players also comes with its own set of considerations. Indeed, finding the right orthotic can sometimes be tricky. With that in mind, our expert panelists weigh in on how best to treat this unique group of patients. Q: What are the two or three most common biomechanical complaints you see in your pediatric patients who play soccer? A: All three panelists say Sever’s disease (calcaneal apophysitis) is among the co

| Continue reading
Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
45,375 reads | 1 comments | 04/03/2003

Have you seen your share of patients who have back pain as a result of compensating for gait-related problems? If so, you’re not alone. Some patients may indeed get relief from lower back pain after getting custom orthotics. With this in mind, our expert panelists tackle this important subject. Q: Podiatrists often report that many of their patients experience relief of low back pain after receiving custom orthotics. What is the relationship?

| Continue reading
Clinical Editor: Howard Dananberg, DPM
10,692 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2003

You may find that even the best of custom foot orthotics are insufficient to manage a particular patient’s problem. Either too much force is applied to the foot or perhaps the foot orthotic cannot provide the necessary support. In some of these cases, one may consider using an ankle foot orthotic (AFO). In a follow-up to last month’s cover story, a panel of experts address how and when they employ these devices in treatment. Q: In what type of situation do you consider using an AFO or similar brace? A: Alan Banks, DPM, uses an AFO in various situations, saying the device can be

| Continue reading
Clinical Editor: Howard Dananberg, DPM
35,534 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2002

As December arrives, patients who enjoy winter sports begin to think about skiing. Ski boot technology has come a long way in recent years, with many comfort features added to complement the performance the boots are designed to provide. Patients will often ask your opinion as to what they need and how they can enhance their skiing. With this in mind, our expert panelists offer their opinions. Q: What are the most interesting advances now available in ski boots for the upcoming season? A: In the past five years, ski boots have moved in a few directions, according to Ben Wax, CPe

| Continue reading
Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
12,533 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2002
When patients have certain occupations, you may have to take a different approach to try to control abnormal forces in the foot. Obviously, performing a biomechanical evaluation is essential as you have to identify individual demands before tackling occupation-specific modifications. With this in mind, our panelists address the more demanding occupations and what considerations come into play with orthotic modifications. Q: How and why do you modify your orthotic prescriptions for patients whose jobs require standing in place for prolonged periods? A: Milton J. Stern, DPM, and Ambik | Continue reading

13,308 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2002
You may prescribe orthotics for a variety of problems. However, the success or failure of treatment may depend on the type of shoes your patients wear along with the type of modifications which you make to the shoe. With this in mind, our expert panelists address the use of shoe modifications as an adjunct to care. Q: What type of modifications do you use most often and how does this affect patient symptoms? A: Nicholas Sol, DPM, says he most commonly prescribes a double rocker sole. He says most of his colleagues have a supply of these soles in the form of their cast shoes and boo | Continue reading

112,962 reads | 2 comments | 06/03/2002
Using rearfoot posts on custom foot orthoses has become a mainstay of orthotic therapy in podiatry. However, it has been shown that measuring neutral position of the subtalar joint via inversion and eversion of the calcaneus is flawed in terms of its reproducibility. Studies concerning whether neutral position of the subtalar joint is a viable method of assessment have questioned the foundation of podiatric biomechanics. Yet in offices around the world, the 4-degree varus rearfoot post seems to be a standard approach. With this in mind, our expert panelists offer their take on this issue. | Continue reading

3,048 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2002