News and Trends

A diabetic patient on dialysis presented with a non-healing great toe wound with exposed bone. A study submitted to the SAWC found a 19.5 annual incidence of ulceration in diabetic patients on hemodialysis.
Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
6,190 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2008

 


Two abstracts, which will be presented at the upcoming Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC), seek to address the impact of dialysis upon diabetic wound healing and the long-term mortality rates of those who undergo non-traumatic amputation.
For the one abstract’s retrospective review, researchers evaluated 150 patients with diabetes on hemodialysis. These patients had 30 months of follow-up for foot ulcers, infections, amputations and death. The abstract authors sought to determine if the patients received “standard preventative care” consistent with patien

 

| Continue reading
In a recent policy change that has been met with “mixed” reaction, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) has decided that those who renew ACFAS membership do not have to be members of the American Podiatric Medical Association.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
7,226 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2008

In a change to a longstanding policy, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) recently lifted a requirement that renewing college members must maintain a membership in the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). The policy change only affects renewing members as new ACFAS members still must belong to APMA when they join the college. In a letter sent to the college membership, ACFAS President Daniel Hatch, DPM, noted that the college has been contacted by those who cite a financial hardship of having to belong to two groups, or have professional differences with various

| Continue reading
This CT scan depicts a navicular stress fracture. A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine examines a possible link between CT scans and an increased risk of cancer. (Photo courtesy of Brian Fullem, DPM)
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
12,548 reads | 0 comments | 01/03/2008

     Physicians reportedly obtain over 60 million computed tomography (CT) scans each year in the United States. However, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) suggests that CT scans may be linked to an increased risk of radiation exposure and cancer.      Citing evidence from epidemiologic studies, the authors of the NEJM article indicate that organ doses from a common CT study, consisting of two or three scans, may result in an increased risk of cancer.       “As compared with plain film radiography, CT invo

| Continue reading
A study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests running shoes of different prices have comparable cushioning regardless of cost.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
12,143 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2007

When choosing a pair of running shoes, consumers have a wide range of choices with a number of models available in different price ranges. Does buying a more expensive running shoe necessarily translate into getting a better quality shoe? A recent study suggests there may not be that much difference in cushioning between inexpensive and more expensive shoes.

The study, which was recently published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, compared a total of nine pairs of men’s running shoes from three different manufacturers. Researchers compared low-priced shoes (&poun

| Continue reading
In a new study, 10 to 18 percent of patients with diabetes said they would sacrifice eight to 10 years of life in perfect health to avoid a life of diabetic treatments.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
7,404 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2007

Given that patients with diabetes can face extensive treatments due to the risk of complications, adherence to treatment regimens may be a problem due to a perceived decline in their quality of life.

A new study finds that although end-stage complications have the greatest effect on quality of life, comprehensive treatments affect quality of life to the degree that some patients were willing to forego years of healthy living to avoid treatments.

In the study, which was recently published in Diabetes Care, researchers interviewed 701 patients with diabetes a

| Continue reading
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
3,890 reads | 0 comments | 10/27/2007
Do Trauma Patients With Diabetes Face Higher Complication Rates?

Patients with diabetes face a higher risk of complications in a number of areas. A large study recently published in the Archives of Surgery notes that those with diabetes also face more complications from trauma surgery. From 1984 to 2002, researchers examined 12,489 patients with diabetes, matching their ages, sex and injury severity with 12,489 non-diabetic patients from 27 Pennsylvania trauma centers. The study concluded that patients with diabetes spent more time in the intensive care unit and received venti

| Continue reading
In order to help reduce the risk of surgical site infections (as shown above), the authors of a recent review in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery emphasize appropriate management of the patient’s blood glucose levels, oxygenation and temperature.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
10,443 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2007

Podiatric surgery can carry inherent risks including the possibility of perioperative infection. A recent article in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) offers several pertinent recommendations that aim to prevent some of the reported 780,000 surgical site infections that occur every year in the United States, according to the study authors.

Although they acknowledge that preoperative antibiotics are associated with lower rates of surgical site infections, the authors of the JBJS article say surgeons should continue antibiotics for no more than 24 hours afte

| Continue reading
A recent study claims a link between chronic plantar heel pain and increased ankle dorsiflexion with researchers noting their conclusion is contrary to the “common clinical perspective.”
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
7,199 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2007

With the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rising, how can healthcare institutions protect patients? The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) recently conducted a survey of 1,237 hospitals and has formulated recommendations for preventing MRSA transmission.

The study noted the rate of MRSA was 46 in 1,000 patients. Of those patients, 34 in 1,000 patients were infected and 12 in 1,000 patients were colonized.

The APIC emphasizes the importance of good hand hygiene, including frequent hand washing, alcohol-based

| Continue reading
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
14,489 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2007
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
6,898 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2007

Can depression spur the development of diabetes? A recent study in the Archives of Internal Medicine concludes that older patients who are depressed have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

| Continue reading