News and Trends

Here one can see a fracture in a patient with diabetic neuropathy after she fell. A new study says patients with diabetes face an increased risk of complications following trauma surgery.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
5,017 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2008

Patients with diabetes face a higher risk of complications in a number of areas. A large study recently published in the Archives of Surgery notes that those with diabetes also face more complications from trauma surgery.

From 1984 to 2002, researchers examined 12,489 patients with diabetes, matching their ages, sex and injury severity with 12,489 non-diabetic patients from 27 Pennsylvania trauma centers. The study concluded that patients with diabetes spent more time in the intensive care unit and received ventilator support for a longer period of time. Twenty-three perc | Continue reading

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine notes that just 4 percent of physicians surveyed have an extensive and fully functioning electronic medical records (EMR) system while 13 percent said they have a basic EMR system.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
8,969 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2008

Given the potential benefits of quicker reimbursement and improved productivity, and the need to ensure HIPAA compliance, you would think electronic medical records (EMR) would be in place in the majority of physician practices. How many doctors are actually using the EMR Systems in the office? Not many, according to a recently published survey in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

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An extensive CDC survey notes that arthritis creates an additional barrier to exercise for patients with diabetes. Cherri Choate, DPM, suggests low-impact water exercises for such patients.
Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
6,357 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2008


Getting patients with diabetes to exercise may be an uphill battle due to disease concerns. The combination of arthritis with diabetes can be an additional barrier to activity, according to a large survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The CDC utilized 2005 and 2007 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which surveyed hundreds of thousands of people across the United States and its territories. The BRFSS survey indicated that the prevalence of arthritis in adults diagnosed with diabetes was 52 percent. Furthermore

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Renewing members of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons are no longer required to maintain membership in the American Podiatric
Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
6,790 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2008


The membership of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) has agreed with the college’s board of directors that renewing members do not have to maintain membership in the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA).
In the recent vote, 53 percent supported the board’s original decision from last fall. Podiatric surgeons must still be members of the APMA when they join the ACFAS but can drop association membership when they renew college membership. Reportedly 66 percent of the ACFAS membership cast their votes on this issue.
John Giuri

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Here one can see an advanced case of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A new study examines the prevalence of foot ulcers in patients with RA.
Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
15,765 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/2008


Patients commonly present with ingrown toenails and treatments range from chemical matrixectomy to the newer orthonyxia procedure. A new study in the Journal of the American College of Surgery concludes that orthonyxia, using a metal brace for the toe, is superior to partial matrix excision in terms of recovery and patient satisfaction.
Researchers randomized 105 consecutive patients with 109 toenails, excluding patients with diabetes and/or paronychias. Fifty-eight patients underwent partial matrix excision, which included 5 to 10 mL of lidocaine 1%, according to th | Continue reading

The largest randomized, multicenter, controlled trial on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) concluded that NPWT is more effective than advanced moist wound therapy in facilitating the closure of diabetic foot ulcers and reducing secondary amputations.
Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
17,598 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2008


Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is more effective than advanced moist wound therapy in facilitating the closure of diabetic foot ulcers and reducing secondary amputations. These are the findings of researchers who recently published the largest randomized, multicenter, controlled trial on NPWT.
In the study, which was published in Diabetes Care, researchers randomized 169 patients to VAC Therapy (KCI) and 166 patients to advanced moist wound therapy (primarily hydrogels and alginates). Patients had stage 2 or 3 (as per the Wagner scale) calcaneal, dorsal or plan

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A diabetic patient on dialysis presented with a non-healing great toe wound with exposed bone. A study submitted to the SAWC found a 19.5 annual incidence of ulceration in diabetic patients on hemodialysis.
Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
6,453 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2008

 


Two abstracts, which will be presented at the upcoming Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC), seek to address the impact of dialysis upon diabetic wound healing and the long-term mortality rates of those who undergo non-traumatic amputation.
For the one abstract’s retrospective review, researchers evaluated 150 patients with diabetes on hemodialysis. These patients had 30 months of follow-up for foot ulcers, infections, amputations and death. The abstract authors sought to determine if the patients received “standard preventative care” consistent with patien

 

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In a recent policy change that has been met with “mixed” reaction, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) has decided that those who renew ACFAS membership do not have to be members of the American Podiatric Medical Association.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
7,469 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2008

In a change to a longstanding policy, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) recently lifted a requirement that renewing college members must maintain a membership in the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). The policy change only affects renewing members as new ACFAS members still must belong to APMA when they join the college. In a letter sent to the college membership, ACFAS President Daniel Hatch, DPM, noted that the college has been contacted by those who cite a financial hardship of having to belong to two groups, or have professional differences with various

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This CT scan depicts a navicular stress fracture. A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine examines a possible link between CT scans and an increased risk of cancer. (Photo courtesy of Brian Fullem, DPM)
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
12,838 reads | 0 comments | 01/03/2008

     Physicians reportedly obtain over 60 million computed tomography (CT) scans each year in the United States. However, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) suggests that CT scans may be linked to an increased risk of radiation exposure and cancer.      Citing evidence from epidemiologic studies, the authors of the NEJM article indicate that organ doses from a common CT study, consisting of two or three scans, may result in an increased risk of cancer.       “As compared with plain film radiography, CT invo

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A study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests running shoes of different prices have comparable cushioning regardless of cost.
By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
12,398 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2007

When choosing a pair of running shoes, consumers have a wide range of choices with a number of models available in different price ranges. Does buying a more expensive running shoe necessarily translate into getting a better quality shoe? A recent study suggests there may not be that much difference in cushioning between inexpensive and more expensive shoes.

The study, which was recently published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, compared a total of nine pairs of men’s running shoes from three different manufacturers. Researchers compared low-priced shoes (&poun

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