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Current Concepts In Wound Bed Preparation

Lee C. Rogers, DPM | 25,526 reads | 0 comments | 07/27/2011

Proper preparation of the wound bed is essential to priming the wound for effective healing. Accordingly, this author discusses key principles from the literature and shares insights from his clinical experience in employing debridement and adjunctive modalities to help facilitate better wound healing and eventual wound closure.

Expert Pointers On Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 31,337 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2007

Given the increasing use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) to spur wound healing, our expert panelists return for the second part of this Q&A discussion on NPWT (see “Inside Insights On Negative Pressure Wound Therapy,” page 24, May issue). They offer specific pearls on the use of NPWT, how to combine the modality with skin grafts and silver dressings, and tips for avoiding wound maceration. Q: Do you have any pearls for using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)? A: Eric Travis, DPM, utilizes VAC therapy (KCI) mostly at 125 mmHg of continuous suction.

Current Concepts In Managing The Wound Microenvironment

By Amy Jelinek, DPM, and Vickie Driver, DPM, FACFAS | 28,900 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2006

   Wound healing is a process that involves the stages of coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation and repair of the matrix, epithelialization and remodeling of the scar tissue. These stages overlap and the entire process can last for months.1    During the post-injury coagulation phase, platelets initiate the wound healing process by releasing a number of soluble mediators including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta).

Can A New Biologic Matrix Facilitate Improved Wound Healing?

By Ann Anderson, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 19,010 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2005

   The field of advanced wound care science continues to deliver new products and concepts for use in healing problem wounds of the lower extremity. The market now includes two living cell products and numerous biologically active products that are the result of bioengineering research and development. The real advantage of these new technologies is that we can now actively stimulate healing whereas most of the prior advances in wound care simply helped to optimize the wound environment.

New Wound Dressing Offers Promise Of Improved Healing

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 5,204 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2003

It can be challenging to maintain an optimum environment for wound healing in certain patients. It can also be challenging to sift through the vast array of wound care dressings on the market and find the right one that will help your patient. However, you may welcome the arrival of a new dressing that is reportedly cost-effective, easy to use and has a wide range of potential indications.

What You Should Know About Wound Healing And Hyalofill

By Alan J. Cantor, DPM | 11,489 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2002

The last decade has seen a tremendous evolution in the field of advanced wound management, both as a discipline and in regard to the development of wound healing therapies. New dressings, human skin equivalents, and barometric intervention all compete for utilization in the wound healing process. While each of these options is a viable intervention, there still needs to be more recognition of how wound biology and histo-cellular function affect wound healing.

The Role Of MMPs In Chronic Wound Edema

By Adrianne P.S. Smith, MD, FACEP | 23,442 reads | 2 comments | 08/03/2003

Wound healing progresses through a series of processes, which include the formation of granulation tissue, epithelialization and connective tissue remodeling. These events require continuous modification of the complex cellular support matrix. This matrix is comprised of: structural proteins (collagen and elastin); specialized “anchoring” proteins (fibronectin, laminin and fibrillin); and proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, heparin, dermatan sulfate and keratan sulfate.

Wound Chemotherapy: Can It Help Facilitate Optimal Outcomes?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 3,488 reads | 0 comments | 08/18/2009

At the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), we are frequently saddled with the most complex patients (and wounds) I have worked with in my career. Our "Toe and Flow" philosophy has been evolving to develop what we call “wound chemotherapy.”

Lately, we have been very active in modifying many of the techniques first described by Wim Fleischmann, MD, PhD, and others to provide active matrix management (negative pressure wound therapy) with other chemotherapeutic tools (i.e. antimicrobials/antiseptics, analgesics, etc.) to manipulate the wound environment.

Expert Insights On Dispensing Wound Care Products In The Office

Animesh Bhatia, DPM, CWS | 20,279 reads | 0 comments | 07/23/2010

Dispensing wound care products in the office can facilitate patient convenience, patient adherence and a better continuity of care that fosters improved outcomes. Accordingly, this author provides an overview of products that could be dispensed to patients in the office as well as insights on inventory management, coding and reimbursement.

Different Perspectives On Debridement And Wound Flora Identification

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 4,300 reads | 0 comments | 12/01/2010

Looking at medical disciplines outside of podiatry may give us new perspectives in our approach to wound care.

I was having a chat recently in New York with Marjana Tomic-Canic, PhD, a Professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Miami. It triggered an idea that we'd discussed some years ago but I think it rather apropos now.