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A Guide To Preventative Offloading Of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Jason R. Hanft, DPM, Daniel T. Hall IV, DPM, and Ashish Kapila, DPM | 48,664 reads | 1 comments | 11/21/2011

Given the repetitive microtrauma experienced by patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, proper offloading is critical to the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. Accordingly, these authors explore the potential of total contact casts, Charcot restraint orthotic walkers and other offloading devices, and discuss key factors that affect patient adherence.

Dressing Facilitates Wound Healing Principles For A Variety Of Ulcers

By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor | 5,342 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2006

   When looking for a wound care product that offers antimicrobial properties, provides effective debridement and facilitates a moist wound care environment, podiatrists may want to consider the AmeriGel Wound Dressing. As if these benefits were not enough, one can use the dressing to treat a variety of wounds, including diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, post-surgical incisions and first- and second-degree burns.    R. Daniel Davis, DPM, says the topical medication is an affordable and effective option in his armamentarium.

Can Microcirculation Changes Predict Non-Healing Ulcers?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 19,450 reads | 0 comments | 01/03/2006

   Researchers of a recent study say assessing microcirculation changes may help predict whether diabetic foot ulcers will heal. The authors of the study, which was published in a recent issue of The Lancet, utilized medical hyperspectral imaging to perform these assessments and add that the new technology may help identify patients with diabetes who are at higher risk for foot ulcers.    Researchers of the study examined 108 patients, including 51 patients with diabetic neuropathy, 36 with diabetes but no neuropathy and 21 control patients without diabetes.

When Diabetic Foot Ulcers Can Be Managed At Home

By Ronald A. Sage, DPM | 43,288 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2004

Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes can be expected to develop ulceration in their lifetime, thus putting them at risk for lower extremity amputation. Treatment for infected diabetic foot wounds accounts for one quarter of all diabetic hospital admissions in the United States and Great Britain.1-3 Patient education, proper footgear and regular foot examination can decrease the frequency and severity of ulceration.

How To Manage Heel Ulcers In Patients With Diabetes

By Jonathan Moore, DPM, and Pamela Jensen, DPM | 51,971 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2005

   Diabetic heel ulcers constitute one of the most frustrating problems for podiatric physicians. Pressure ulcers affect nearly 2 million people each year and account for annual healthcare costs that range between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion.

Plantar Skin Flaps On Diabetic Ulcers: Are They Worth It?

hmpadmin | 11,684 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2004

Yes, the authors say skin flaps can be a viable option if conservative wound care fails. They emphasize that flaps can provide a unique match to the soft tissue properties of weightbearing areas and facilitate healing in wounds with exposed bone and tendon. By Gary P. Jolly, DPM, and Thomas Zgonis, DPM Historically, the treatment of chronic foot wounds has centered around aggressive debridement, pressure reduction and, lately, the application of wound healing accelerators such as various growth factors.

Understanding The Correlation Between PAD And Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Kazu Suzuki, DPM, CWS | 2,948 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2008

Please click here for the full Continuing Medical Education article: http://www.naccme.com/program/2008-pd-8/ Given the significant dilemma of peripheral arterial disease and its strong association with diabetic complications in the lower extremity, this author reviews pertinent diagnostic keys and assesses the current research on treatment options.

Is HBOT Cost-Effective For Diabetic Foot Ulcers?­­­­­­

Caroline E. Fife, MD, CWS | 17,769 reads | 0 comments | 06/01/2009

   It is estimated that Medicare spends $1.5 billion annually to treat diabetic foot ulcers (DFU).1 The debate continues on the cost effectiveness of immediate amputation in comparison with “conservative treatment” using a variety of modalities.

   The cost of healing a DFU is related to its severity but detailed “cost to heal” data stratified by Wagner grade are sparse. Primary amputation is costly not so much because of the expense of the surgical procedure itself but because of the consequences of amputation (e.g. rehabilitation and institutional care).

Essential Insights On Treating Chronic Venous Stasis Ulcers

Nanjin J. Park, DPM, Latricia Allen, DPM, MPH, Guosheng Gu, MD, and Vickie R. Driver, DPM, MS, FACFAS | 55,143 reads | 0 comments | 06/22/2012

Given the common and chronic nature of venous stasis ulcers, these authors offer salient diagnostic insights, keys to selecting appropriate wound care dressings and a guide to choosing optimal compression modalities. They also emphasize the importance of patient education in reducing the risk of recurrence.

Is Tendon Lengthening The Best Treatment For Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

J. Monroe Laborde, MD, MS | 27,569 reads | 0 comments | 04/23/2012

Diabetic neuropathy results in tendon imbalance and decreased protective sensation.1,2 Tendon imbalance, especially Achilles or gastrocnemius-soleus tightness, causes or aggravates most foot problems.3-7 Achilles tendon or gastrocnemius-soleus tightness causes increased stress in the foot.8,9 This stress can cause a callus and a subsequent forefoot ulcer.8 Increased stress in the foot less commonly leads to the progressive deformity of Charcot arthropathy, most often in the midfoot.