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Essential Insights On Treating Fifth Metatarsal Fractures

By Nicholas Romansky, DPM, and Todd Becker, DPM | 153,882 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Podiatric physicians commonly see fifth metatarsal fractures when treating active patients. The actual rate of occurrence is unknown but some estimate the rate at somewhere between 0.7 and 1.9 percent of all foot fractures. Fractures of the fifth metatarsal can occur at a number of locations and while some of these respond well to conservative treatment, other fractures have been notoriously hard to heal with high rates of nonunion and other complications.

Calcaneal Autograft: Can It Facilitate Salvage Of A Failed First MPJ Implant?

Kenneth Seiter, DPM | 20,203 reads | 0 comments | 02/23/2010

   Surgical revision of a failed silicone prosthesis in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) is a difficult dilemma that many foot and ankle surgeons increasingly encounter. While advocates of silicone and similar implants have alluded to their preliminary benefits, there is a scarcity of literature on how to salvage these failures, especially when they occur in younger, active patients.

   Revision options include implant removal with synovectomy, implant removal with re-insertion of an alternate implant, or bone block distraction arthrodesis.1,2

Treating A Calcaneal Avulsion Fracture In A Patient With Poor Bone Quality

Nicholas J. Bevilacqua, DPM, FACFAS | 21,290 reads | 0 comments | 06/26/2012

This author details the surgical treatment of a calcaneal avulsion fracture in a 59-year-old patient with poor bone quality, who later required revisional surgery consisting of excision of fracture fragment and reattachment of the Achilles tendon.

Performing A Tibio-Talo Calcaneal Fusion After Two Post-ORIF Nonunions

Bradly W. Bussewitz, DPM | 10,267 reads | 0 comments | 01/30/2012

This author discusses using a tibio-talo calcaneal fusion with an intramedullary rod in a distal tibia-fibula fracture in a patient who had sustained two nonunions following open reduction internal fixation.

A Closer Look At Lateral Talar Process Fractures With Snowboarding Injuries

By Jeffrey Robertson and Khurram Khan, DPM | 26,059 reads | 0 comments | 01/30/2009

   As the winter season continues, physicians need to become more aware of snowboarding injuries. The number of ankle injuries continues to rise and, in particular, lateral talar process (LTP) fractures seem to be occurring more frequently within the snowboarding population.

A Closer Look At Arthroscopy For Ankle Fractures And Post-Fracture Defects

Graham A. Hamilton, DPM, and Travis L. Sautter, DPM | 25,569 reads | 0 comments | 08/24/2009

   Arthroscopy is an expedient tool in the management of intra-articular fractures of the ankle and post-fracture articular defects. It provides the surgeon the ability to anatomically reduce a fracture under direct visualization with minimal intervention. It also enables the surgeon to address any articular injury primarily.

Identifying And Treating Stress Fractures And Lateral Ankle Sprains In Athletes

Ron Raducanu, DPM, FACFAS | 108,283 reads | 0 comments | 02/01/2010

   As our population gets more and more active, it stands to reason that they will suffer from more and more sports-related injuries.

   In the adult population, we see this with the “weekend warrior” types, who have not been conditioned regularly to participate in strenuous activity. Alternately, we may see adult patients who take on an exercise regimen without seeking the proper guidance on how to progress in intensity.

Can The Fibula-Pro-Tibia Technique Have An Impact For Diabetic Ankle Fractures?

By Christopher L. Reeves, DPM,Alan A. MacGill, DPM,Amber M. Shane, DPM, and Joseph A. Conte, DPM Clinical Editor: John S. Steinberg, DPM | 20,160 reads | 0 comments | 09/30/2008

Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes present a great challenge for the foot and ankle surgeon. Indeed, there is an abundance of literature documenting the difficulty of managing diabetic ankle fractures. Surgical treatment can be fraught with complications such as delayed bone and wound healing, and the development of Charcot neuroarthropathy.

Rethinking Our Approach To Jones Fractures To Facilitate Shorter Post-Op Recovery

Edward Blahous, DPM, FACFAS | 109,585 reads | 0 comments | 11/22/2011

If there was a surgical technique that could abbreviate the time it took to achieve clinical and radiographic healing of first metatarsal base osteotomies by three weeks, podiatric physicians would be obligated to investigate. Further, if this new technique afforded superior outcomes in comparison to the existing surgical standard, word would spread quickly to foot surgeons everywhere. Imagine how much more rapidly athletes could bear weight, exercise, go to work or return to their sport.