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Rethinking Our Approach To Jones Fractures To Facilitate Shorter Post-Op Recovery

Edward Blahous, DPM, FACFAS | 111,155 reads | 0 comments | 11/22/2011

If there was a surgical technique that could abbreviate the time it took to achieve clinical and radiographic healing of first metatarsal base osteotomies by three weeks, podiatric physicians would be obligated to investigate. Further, if this new technique afforded superior outcomes in comparison to the existing surgical standard, word would spread quickly to foot surgeons everywhere. Imagine how much more rapidly athletes could bear weight, exercise, go to work or return to their sport.

How To Perform The Double Calcaneal Osteotomy

By Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Brian D. Neerings, DPM | 31,798 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2004

   The double calcaneal osteotomy includes a combination of the posterior calcaneal displacement osteotomy (PCDO) and the Evans anterior opening wedge calcaneal osteotomy. One would consider this combination for symptomatic flexible flatfoot deformity in both the adolescent flexible flatfoot and the adult with late stage II (Johnson and Strom’s classification) posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD).    The PCDO consists of a transcortical osteotomy through the posterior tuber of the calcaneus with medial transposition of the tuberosity.

Calcaneal Autograft: Can It Facilitate Salvage Of A Failed First MPJ Implant?

Kenneth Seiter, DPM | 20,349 reads | 0 comments | 02/23/2010

   Surgical revision of a failed silicone prosthesis in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) is a difficult dilemma that many foot and ankle surgeons increasingly encounter. While advocates of silicone and similar implants have alluded to their preliminary benefits, there is a scarcity of literature on how to salvage these failures, especially when they occur in younger, active patients.

   Revision options include implant removal with synovectomy, implant removal with re-insertion of an alternate implant, or bone block distraction arthrodesis.1,2

Essential Insights On Treating Fifth Metatarsal Fractures

By Nicholas Romansky, DPM, and Todd Becker, DPM | 154,978 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Podiatric physicians commonly see fifth metatarsal fractures when treating active patients. The actual rate of occurrence is unknown but some estimate the rate at somewhere between 0.7 and 1.9 percent of all foot fractures. Fractures of the fifth metatarsal can occur at a number of locations and while some of these respond well to conservative treatment, other fractures have been notoriously hard to heal with high rates of nonunion and other complications.

What You Should Know About Navicular Stress Fractures

John R. Fowler, MD, John P. Gaughan, PhD, Barry P. Boden, MD, and Joseph S. Torg, MD | 160,796 reads | 0 comments | 10/21/2010

Once considered a rare form of stress fractures, navicular stress fractures are being diagnosed in an increasing number of patients. Accordingly, these authors offer diagnostic insights, a pertinent case study and a thorough review of the literature.

How Mini-Rail Fixators Can Be Beneficial For Jones Fractures

William Fishco DPM FACFAS | 15,643 reads | 3 comments | 04/12/2011

A Jones fracture is a fracture of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction of the fifth metatarsal base. Fractures in this area are known to have difficulty healing due to the tenuous blood supply to this area.

To that end, one may treat these fractures with strict non-weightbearing for a minimum of six weeks or explore surgical options.

New Bone Growth Stimulator Offers Treatment For Nonunion Fractures

By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor | 19,996 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2007

      Facilitating the healing of nonunion fractures can be challenging. In order to address this challenge, a number of practitioners have been turning to the DonJoy OL1000 Bone Growth Stimulator as it reportedly provides an easy to use, noninvasive treatment option.       The bone growth stimulator is a lightweight, battery-powered device that can accommodate a large variety of fracture sites, according to DJO Inc., the manufacturer of the device.

Secrets To Treating Ankle Fractures In Athletes

By Damieon Brown, DPM, Lawrence DiDomenico, DPM, FACFAS, and Michael VanPelt, DPM | 77,795 reads | 0 comments | 01/03/2007

      More and more people are in the pursuit of becoming active and staying fit. More often than not, individuals tend to achieve this goal by participating in sporting activities. Whether they are participating in intramural or competitive activities, these athletes place a great demand on the ankles and feet.       According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System for 2000-2001, the ankle, knee and lower extremity were common sites of injury.

Current Concepts In Treating Fifth Metatarsal Fractures

Jennifer Miklos, DPM, Alan Catanzariti, DPM, FACFAS, and Robert Mendicino, DPM, FACFAS | 146,310 reads | 0 comments | 04/21/2010

Given the intricacies of these fractures, these authors offer salient diagnostic pointers, a thorough review of the literature and pertinent pearls from their experience with the treatment of tuberosity fractures, Jones fractures and stress fractures of the fifth metatarsal.

How To Treat Ankle Fractures In Patients With Diabetes

By Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Travis L. Sautter, DPM | 28,883 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes and documented neuropathy present a significant challenge to the clinician. The majority of literature has indicated that ankle fractures in this particular patient population are often difficult to manage and complication rates are reportedly quite high. These poor outcomes are similar for both conservative and surgical treatment. There are several factors implicated in the high complication rates one sees in the management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Many of these patients have significant osteopenia.