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A Closer Look At Neoteric Biomechanics

By Dennis Shavelson, DPM | 12,383 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2007

For years, it seems like the $5,000 bunion and pressures from HMOs diverted DPMs’ attention from biomechanics. The emphasis of our education and practices strayed from Root toward Ilizarov and coding. “Gold standard” orthotics cast from foam or “posted to cast” do not generate the pride and acceptance that a Root device once did for podiatry and our orthotic fees are less justified when compared to high-tech, over-the-counter footbeds and custom devices casted by other providers or over the Internet.

Emerging Concepts In Podiatric Biomechanics

By Kevin A. Kirby, DPM, MS | 80,367 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2006

    The world of podiatric biomechanics is very different now than when Merton Root, DPM, created the first Department of Podiatric Biomechanics at the California College of Chiropody in San Francisco in 1966.1 During those exciting early years of development within the new subspecialty of “podiatric biomechanics,” Dr.

Negotiating The Biomechanics Of Equinus

Russell Volpe DPM | 7,923 reads | 0 comments | 05/27/2011

As someone who teaches and writes a great deal about biomechanics, orthopedic and pediatric podiatric medicine, I often discuss equinus influences as among the most destructive on the foot in gait. This critical sagittal plane pathology can occur at any age and comes in congenital and acquired forms. As bipedal locomotion is essentially a sagittal plane event as we move the body forward on a horizontal surface, limitations in sagittal plane motion can lead to destructive compensations that ultimately precipitate pathology.

Comparing Lessons On Biomechanics And The Realities Of Clinical Experience

Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM | 10,839 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Although what one learned in podiatric medical school is invaluable in a podiatry career, sometimes podiatrists may encounter a different reality in clinical practice. These expert panelists weigh what they learned in school with their experience and the current research. They also detail which directions future orthotic research should take. Q: What is the current research telling us about how the foot really functions as opposed to what many podiatrists were taught in school?

What Happened To Continuing Education For Podiatric Biomechanics?

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS | 5,826 reads | 4 comments | 11/18/2011

While doing background research for this blog, I originally intended to focus on the reasons why topics relating to biomechanics have vanished from presentations at major podiatric conferences around the country. I wanted to review the lecture schedules from last year as well as upcoming meetings in 2012 to make sure that I was correct regarding the dearth of biomechanics lectures.

Challenging Conventional Thinking On Orthotic Therapy And Podiatric Biomechanics

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 3,947 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Every now and then, I catch an episode of Bravo’s Inside The Actor’s Studio. At the end of the hour, the interviewee participates in a pithy, amusing and sometimes revealing questionnaire. One of the standard questions is “What is your least favorite word?” For me, it would be two words: conventional and assumption. Those who assume are too lazy to seek out the truth. Conventional implies there is one predominant way of doing things but the dynamic nature of our lives suggests different models.

Key Considerations With Digital Amputations And Biomechanics

Desmond Bell DPM CWS FACCWS | 4,928 reads | 0 comments | 06/26/2012

“By God, sir. I will not abide another toe!” — The Big Lebowski to the Dude

If you are a fan of the Coen brothers’ cult comedy classic, The Big Lebowski, you already know that the loss of a toe is central to the plot of the story. If you haven't seen the film once, I will not play the spoiler. For the rest of us who have watched the movie at least five or 10 times, grab yourself a Sioux City Sarsaparilla and read on.

Redefining Biomechanics Of The Foot And Ankle

By Christopher Nester, BSc (Hons), PhD, Andrew Findlow, BSc (Hons), Anmin Liu, BSc (Hons), Erin Ward, DPM, and Jay Cocheba, DPM | 29,283 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2005

   When it comes to the load-bearing joints of the lower limb, the foot is the least understood. This stems from the fact that its size is a major barrier to quality scientific investigation but is also partly due to the the misconception that its function is simple. While we may believe we know a great deal about the biomechanics of the foot and ankle, in reality, it is relatively uncharted territory compared to the knee and hip.    The foot is far from simple as it comprises hundreds of different ligaments and bony structures and scores of articulations.

Key Insights On The Evolution Of Orthoses And Biomechanics

Guest Clinical Editor: David Levine, DPM, CPed | 7,876 reads | 0 comments | 01/30/2009

   While more research continues to emerge on biomechanics, some physicians feel it is not emphasized enough in podiatry and that other specialists may be gaining more of a foothold in prescribing orthotic devices. Accordingly, expert panelists discuss these controversial issues and examine the potential impact for the profession.

   Q: With much emphasis in our podiatry journals on surgery, where and how do you see biomechanics in our profession evolving?

Understanding The Biomechanics Of Subtalar Joint Arthroereisis

Kevin A. Kirby, DPM | 53,747 reads | 1 comments | 03/22/2011

Is a commonly utilized classification scheme for subtalar arthroereisis implants “biomechanically inaccurate and ambiguous”? With a thorough review of the literature, this author discusses kinematic and kinetic functions of the subtalar joint, and the biomechanical effects of the subtalar arthroereisis procedure.