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A Guide To First MPJ Arthrodesis For Active Patients

By Lawrence A. DiDomenico, DPM, and Alfonso A. Haro III, DPM | 66,969 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2005

   Surgical recommendations are sparse when evaluating treatment options for the athletic population diagnosed with hallux limitus, hallux rigidus or first metatarsophalangeal (MPJ) osteoarthritis. However, we have found success in treating athletes with first MPJ arthrodesis, and helping them to achieve pain relief and a return to activities.    Several surgeons have found similar success as evidenced by a review of the literature on this subject. In 1996, Bouche, et.

How To Perform An Isolated Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis

By Douglas K. Blacklidge, DPM | 50,643 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2008

Isolated arthrodesis procedures for the hindfoot are an interesting and sometimes controversial topic for foot and ankle surgeons. Historically, when it came to most major rearfoot deformities and joint conditions, surgeons utilized the triple arthrodesis versus any isolated joint fusions of this complex. The thinking was that the subtalar, calcaneocuboid and talonavicular joints all function together to allow pronation and supination of the entire foot, so if one joint needed fusion, they all needed fusion.

Balancing Digital Arthrodesis With Flexor Tendon Transfers And MPJ Corrections

Jerome A. Slavitt, DPM, FACFAS | 19,297 reads | 0 comments | 02/24/2011

Hammertoe correction, one of the mainstays of podiatric surgery, is not as simple and straightforward as one would think. A surgeon may schedule a hammertoe surgery and assume an arthroplasty will correct the deformity. The surgeon is thinking this procedure is quick, easy to perform and he or she will be in and out of the operating room in no time.

The new Smart Toe™ Intramedullary Memory Implant (MMI-USA, Inc.) reportedly obviates the need for K-wires and facilitates adequate correction for hammertoe arthrodesis.

Can A New Implant Lead To Easier Hammertoe Arthrodesis?

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 7,221 reads | 1 comments | 02/03/2008

Patients having hammertoe arthrodesis have had to undergo fixation with K-wires that can cause complications including pin tract infection. However, a new implant may obviate the need for K-wires and provide adequate correction. The Smart Toe™ Intramedullary Memory Implant was specifically developed for hammertoe arthrodesis and is composed of nitinol (Memometal® Alloy Ti-Ni), according to the manufacturer MMI-USA, Inc. Since the implant is one piece, no connection is required. There is no post-op implant exposure and no disruption of healthy joints.

Why Patients May Prefer Arthrodesis With A New Screw

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 4,249 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2004

Although performing digital arthrodesis on the lesser metatarsals with the traditional K-wire is reliable, patients may not be pleased with the prospect of a pin sticking out of their feet for several weeks after the procedure. A new screw offers compression, stability and perhaps an improved likelihood of patients enjoying the convenience of internal fixation. The Digital Compression Screw™ offers patients an alternative which they may find more cosmetically acceptable.

Study Shows Low Nonunion Rate For Arthrodesis

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 6,613 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2004

A new study on Lapidus arthrodesis presents some encouraging results. In a retrospective study of over 200 patients who underwent the Lapidus arthrodesis procedure, the researchers found only a 5.3 percent nonunion rate. The study, which was recently published in The Journal of Foot And Ankle Surgery (JFAS), assessed the results of a modified procedure, which emphasized joint curettage with subchondral plate preservation and screw fixation. The low nonunion rate is the most significant finding in the study, according to study co-author Lawrence Ford, DPM.

Emerging Insights On The First MPJ Arthrodesis

Shelby Swanson, BA, Andrea Dyack, BS, BA, and Michael S. Lee, DPM, FACFAS | 24,253 reads | 1 comments | 06/21/2011

Arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) was first advocated in 1894 by Clutton for severe, painful hallux valgus.1 McKeever refined the technique in 1952 using intramedullary screw fixation, which is currently the gold standard for treatment of advanced arthritis and/or significant deformities of the hallux.2 Common indications for arthrodesis include stage 3 hallux rigidus (osteoarthritis), rheumatoid arthritis, failed first MPJ implants, severe hallux valgus deformities and post-traumatic arthritis.3,4

A Guide To The Triple Arthrodesis For Hindfoot Deformities

Kevin Dux, DPM, Sarah Edgar, DPM, and Peter Blume, DPM, FACFAS | 38,676 reads | 0 comments | 09/24/2012

The triple arthrodesis has evolved to become the gold standard for the correction of sometimes complex hindfoot deformities with long-term follow-up showing high satisfaction rates. Accordingly, these authors offer a closer look at the procedure, review key indications and provide pertinent pearls.

Current Concepts In Ankle Arthroscopy

By Catherine Cheung, DPM | 34,745 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2007

   Ankle arthroscopy is an extremely useful skill for a foot and ankle surgeon. Foot and ankle surgeons use ankle arthroscopies to treat a variety of problems, including osteochondral defects, loose osteochondral fragments, ankle impingement, post-traumatic fibrous bands, synovitis and ligamentous/capsular injuries.    Ankle arthroscopy has several advantages over an open ankle procedure. The surgery is minimally invasive and has a low complication rate. One can perform this on an outpatient basis and it facilitates a relatively easy postoperative recovery period.

How To Manage Lateral Ankle Sprains

By John Hester, DPM, PT | 14,085 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2003

Ankle sprains occur at a rate of roughly 25,000 per day nationwide, account for 10 percent of all emergency department visits and represent 25 percent of all sports injuries (and 25 percent of all time lost from sports).1-3 Ankle sprains are particularly prevalent in sports such as basketball and soccer with ankle sprains representing approximately 50 percent of all basketball injuries and 30 percent of all soccer injuries.4 Yet an estimated 55 percent of people who experience an ankle sprain will not seek professional treatment.5 This is unfortunate since m