Surgical Pearls

By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM
| 13,319 reads | 0 comments
   Back when I left the didactic world of podiatry school and entered my residency, I was ready for a transition that would blend the books with practice. Of course, the first two surgeries I performed did not fit the mold. The first one was a cartilage articulation preservation procedure (CAPP) and the other was a Keller procedure.    The CAPP procedure was... Read More.
By Michael Baker, DPM, CWS
| 7,806 reads | 0 comments
As foot and ankle surgeons, we are constantly reminded that we are the ultimate champions of diabetic foot care. However, another emerging problem is chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) ulcerations. While it does not have nearly the potential impact of limb loss one may see with complications from the diabetic foot, there is an increasing incidence of CVI with the continued aging of the population... Read More.
By Jesse Burks, DPM
| 6,917 reads | 0 comments
   Severe, acute or repetitive chronic inversion ankle sprains can often result in lateral instability of the lateral ankle complex. Although one can treat the vast majority of these conditions conservatively, a significant and unresponsive case may require surgical intervention. Over the course of the past two decades, improved soft tissue anchors and arthroscopic procedures have... Read More.
By Peter M. Wilusz, DPM, and Guy R. Pupp, DPM
| 14,199 reads | 0 comments
   Multiple etiologies exist for painful conditions that involve the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). Hallux abducto valgus and hallux limitus are the most common pathologies of the first MPJ podiatrists see in most foot and ankle clinics. Other causes may include rheumatoid arthritis, trauma, connective tissue disorders, infection, iatrogenic and metabolic disorders.... Read More.
By Erwin Juda, DPM, R.Ph.
| 10,475 reads | 0 comments
   Pain management in the elderly remains one of the most challenging issues for the podiatric surgeon. As life expectancy continues to advance, more geriatric patients will undergo surgery. While these patients may undergo these procedures to help facilitate independence and a better quality of life, one must carefully weigh the risks and benefits of surgical intervention in this... Read More.
By Daniel K. Lee, DPM, and Gregory E. Tilley, DPM
| 14,622 reads | 0 comments
   There have been many surgical treatment modalities described in the podiatric and orthopedic literature for the correction of hallux limitus.1-5 Since the Regnauld procedure was introduced in 1968, surgeons have used it in the treatment of a pathologically long proximal phalanx and hallux limitus.6 However, since its development, this procedure has been characterized as a... Read More.
By Don Green, DPM and Peter S. Kim, DPM
| 89,000 reads | 0 comments
The etiology of heel pain is quite varied. First described by Wood in 1812, the most common cause is thought to be plantar fasciitis. This is typically marked by focal tenderness to any component of the aponeurosis but most frequently at the proximal medial insertion of the plantar aponeurosis.1 Many symptomatic patients with plantar fasciitis demonstrate plantar heel spurs (traction... Read More.
By John A. DeBello, DPM, Kordai I. DeCoteau, DPM, and Eric Beatty, DPM
| 17,717 reads | 0 comments
   Hammertoes may have an etiology that is either congenital or acquired. Pain and cosmetic appearance are the leading factors for patients wanting surgical intervention for hammertoe deformities. While there are a variety of approaches for hammertoe correction, we have found success with a novel approach that emphasizes the use of medial and lateral incisions.    ... Read More.
By Kerry Zang, DPM, Shahram Askari, DPM, A’Nedra Fuller, DPM, and Chris Seuferling, DPM
| 37,656 reads | 2 comments
Addressing the biomechanics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) as well as the first ray are the keys to any surgical correction of first metatarsal pathology. According to Rootian theory, the principal etiologies of hallux limitus are as follows.1 • A long first metatarsal or when the position of the first metatarsal head is relative to the second. When the first metatarsal is long,... Read More.
By John Mozena, DPM, PC, and Tyler Marshall, DPM
| 14,058 reads | 0 comments
   One of the most documented postoperative complications of distal metatarsal osteotomies is adhesive capsulodesis that limits dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). When faced with such a post-op complication, one may be able to use a proven cartilage preservation procedure that maintains, if not improves, the first MPJ range of motion.    ... Read More.
By Dave Nielson, DPM, FAPWCA and Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS
| 9,668 reads | 0 comments
     While the concept of infections has been studied for many years, our current understanding of infections is based upon studies and observations of planktonic bacteria. This is free floating bacteria that cause diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, urinary tract infections, gas gangrene and many other examples. These types of infections often respond well to antibiotics and... Read More.
By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM
| 9,654 reads | 0 comments
   Foot and ankle surgeons have no shortage of choices when it comes to selecting instruments for surgical procedures. Our surgical team has found success in using the Koby line of instruments (OsteoMed) for the treatment of various conditions.    For the last four years, surgeons have found success using Koby instruments for three procedures commonly performed in... Read More.