Sports Medicine

By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, Ann Gagne, LLB, and Eric Kaplan, BS
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Ice hockey is widely known as one of the world’s fastest and most dangerous sports. With the game’s popularity growing at record levels, participation in ice hockey in the United States has experienced substantial growth over the last decade. Over 400,000 male players and 40,000 female players participate under the auspices of USA Hockey (the national hockey governing body), compared to about 190... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Jean Chen-Vitulli, DPM
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Foot blisters are among the most common injuries for athletes. According to research from the Scholl, over 5.2 million people suffer blisters every year. In a study of lower extremity injuries that occurred at the New York City Marathon, the most common foot problems reported were acute shear and stress injuries resulting in blister formation. Aside from being painful, blisters can alter an... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
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A 14-year-old male athlete comes into your office with a chief complaint of ankle pain. He says he had the pain right after a soccer match. His parents and coach concluded that he had sprained his ankle. However, despite treatment, which consisted of rest, ice and the use of an Ace wrap, the patient’s pain continued for two months. He has pain in his ankle when standing and walking, and is not... Read More.
By Troy J. Boffeli, DPM
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Surgeons routinely make treatment decisions based on their training and experience. For example, we typically employ non-operative treatment of Achilles ruptures for the elderly. Surgical repair, on the other hand, is usually recommended for younger, active patients. The traditional teachings on the long-term outcome after Achilles rupture tend to lump conservative treatment of acute rupture with... Read More.
By Mark Caselli, DPM
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Skiers, ice-skaters, joggers, mountain climbers and outdoor enthusiasts are all prone to cold-related skin injuries. Local cold injuries occur when the core (consisting of internal structures such as the brain, heart, lungs and abdominal organs) temperature is maintained but the shell (skin, muscles and extremities) temperature dramatically decreases. The feet are among the most commonly affected... Read More.
By Mark Caselli, DPM
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The performance demands of ballet are comparable to many highly competitive athletic pursuits. Although dancers are artists and not athletes, the athletic demands of dance choreography place the dancer at risk for injuries. Fifteen to 20 percent of dance injuries involve the foot. Chronic injuries tend to predominate as they are related primarily to the repetitive impact loading of the dancer’s... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
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Ever since the first modern triathlon competition was conducted in San Diego in 1974, interest in the sport has grown steadily over the years. Currently, millions of amateur athletes participate in thousands of events annually worldwide. Since triathlon competitors perform three events with little or no rest between them, it can be a challenge for podiatrists to treat injuries that athletes... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Edward C. Rzonca, DPM
| 162,367 reads | 2 comments
Chronic overuse problems that persist despite appropriate care are the hallmarks of a leg length discrepancy (LLD) in an athlete. While the symptoms associated with LLDs are diverse and, at times, vague and confusing, you should suspect limb length asymmetry when athletes have back or lower extremity complaints. Leg length asymmetries appear to be the third most common cause of running injuries... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
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Whenever an athlete presents with an acute vesicular or chronic scaling inflammatory condition of the skin, one must consider contact dermatitis. Often, the activities of these athletes may lead the practitioner to an initial diagnosis of conditions such as friction trauma, infection and pedal hyperhidrosis while treatment of the actual condition, contact dermatitis, is significantly delayed.... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
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Exercise plays an important role in the management of both insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). Regular exercise, especially aerobic exercise, strengthens the heart and circulatory system, thus reducing the chance of heart disease and stroke. It helps decrease blood cholesterol and increases the levels of the “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
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The dancer’s feet are comparable to a concert pianist’s hands. Extensive training, often beginning before the age of 10, is common, especially among girls. Through the years, changing styles and great leaps have placed increased strain on the foot, resulting in the variety of dance injuries we must diagnose and treat today. In a follow-up to the last column (see “How To Identify And Treat Common... Read More.
By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
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Stinging insects and ticks can cause problems for athletes who participate in outdoor sports or activities. At the very least, these stings or bites can lead to itchy and irritating skin conditions. On the more extreme end, these stings or bites may lead to serious anaphylactic reactions or Lyme disease. Therefore, it is important for sports medicine practitioners to recognize the potential... Read More.