Diabetes Watch

By Christopher L. Reeves, DPM,Alan A. MacGill, DPM,Amber M. Shane, DPM, and Joseph A. Conte, DPM Clinical Editor: John S. Steinberg, DPM
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Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes present a great challenge for the foot and ankle surgeon. Indeed, there is an abundance of literature documenting the difficulty of managing diabetic ankle fractures. Surgical treatment can be fraught with complications such as delayed bone and wound healing, and the development of Charcot neuroarthropathy. When it comes to treating diabetic ankle... Read More.
By David Baek, DPM
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     Lower extremity complications associated with diabetes present a special challenge to any physician contemplating surgical management. Prophylactic foot surgery can be described as a procedure to prevent ulceration or re-ulceration in patients with diabetes without significant vascular compromise. This concept is part of a larger classification system, which stratifies the... Read More.
By John Steinberg, DPM
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Given the trends indicating the increasing prevalence of diabetes in the United States, this national health concern has commanded a drastic increase in general public media attention. According to an American Diabetes Association study, the overall costs for diabetes total $98 billion, with direct medical costs of $44 billion and indirect expenses (such as disability, work loss and premature... Read More.
By Pamela M. Jensen, DPM
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Diet and exercise are essential for blood sugar management and are subject of much frustration for the diabetic patient and the physician. With each visit to the physician’s office, the patient has to anticipate the stern lecture about exercising, controlling his or her diet, abstaining from sweets, and testing his or her sugars regularly or face the multitude of complications from diabetes. In... Read More.
By Anthony Yung, DPM
| 9,870 reads | 0 comments
At least 30 percent of patients with diabetes will develop cutaneous manifestations in their lifetime.1 Given that diabetes is a systemic disease, its effects on the skin may arise from many different sources (vascular, metabolic, nutritional disturbances, infectious agents and medications). Several common skin disorders may be associated with diabetes. These include necrobiosis lipoidica... Read More.
By Pamela M. Jensen, DPM
| 24,720 reads | 0 comments
Post-surgical hypertrophic bone formation can be a frustrating problem. It has been identified at fracture, osteotomy and amputation sites. The majority of patients with hypertrophic bone formation are largely asymptomatic and practitioners often identify the condition via radiographs they get for other pathologies. However, those who are symptomatic often have a problematic non-healing wound at... Read More.
By Gordon Zernich, CP, BOCPO, Tomas Dowell, CPO, LPO, and Ronald B. Tolchin, DO, FAAPM&R
| 19,428 reads | 0 comments
Sensory neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Nerve damage results from poorly managed and chronically high levels of blood sugar. In patients who have type 1 diabetes, which usually affects those 25 years and younger, there is insulin deficiency. In regard to people with type 2 diabetes, their insulin production inadequately meets the body’s daily need to metabolize... Read More.
Lauren A. Fisher, DPM, Hillarie L. Sizemore, DPM, and Khurram H. Khan, DPM
| 12,975 reads | 0 comments
Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a very common condition that affects 20 to 30 percent of patients over 50 years of age, equating to an estimated 10 million Americans. As the population ages, the incidence of PAD will likely increase dramatically.1 Intermittent claudication is a symptom among patients with PAD and one can use the presence of these symptoms as a diagnostic tool.2 True... Read More.
By Francesco Serino, MD, and Yimei Cao, MD
| 7,142 reads | 0 comments
In the early 1980s, LoGerfo opened the window of limb salvage in critical stages of diabetic atherosclerosis by fighting the misconception of microangiopathy that had previously prevented attempts to bypass arterial lesions in diabetic foot.1 He produced evidence that revascularization of distal diabetic arterial occlusions can be successful. This evidence in turn gave a fundamental push to... Read More.
By Matt Rampetsreiter, DPM, and Raymond Abdo, DPM
| 27,207 reads | 1 comments
Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is very common sequelae of diabetes mellitus. Patients often complain of burning, tingling, numbness and even sharp stabbing pain. These symptoms can cause sleep disturbances as well as problems with daily activities. Many primary care physicians and podiatrists overlook these symptoms which, in most cases, have been going on for years. Many people are unaware of... Read More.
By Yuki Morita, DPM
| 7,593 reads | 0 comments
Recent advancements in technology have led to numerous adjunctive therapies for healing chronic wounds. In many cases, though, we can achieve healing in a short period of time once we identify the underlying factors that inhibit proper healing. With this in mind, let’s take a closer look at some of these common impediments. While wound hypoxia is the most common obstacle we see, it is also the... Read More.
By Richard M. Stillman, MD, FACS Clinical Editor: John Steinberg, DPM
| 9,279 reads | 0 comments
Managing foot wounds in diabetes patients forms much of the core practice of wound care and podiatry. In the United States, the annual cost for the care of diabetic foot wounds exceeds $5 billion.1 It’s been estimated that anywhere from 2.5 to 10.7 percent of patients with diabetes develop a foot wound each year. Even for wounds that heal, the recurrence rate is approximately 55 percent over the... Read More.