Search

Addressing A Unique Skin Ulceration In A Patient With Neuromuscular Disease

Eric Feit, DPM, FACFAS, and Armin Feradouni, DPM | 9,302 reads | 0 comments | 06/27/2013

These authors discuss the diagnostic workup and eventual surgical treatment to resolve a chronic ulcer in a patient with a history of polio and spina bifida.

Exploring The Potential Of Acellular Dermis Grafts For Wound Healing And Soft Tissue Repair

J. Palmer Branch, DPM, FACFAS | 30,511 reads | 0 comments | 11/29/2012

Offering insights from the literature, practical pearls and coding tips, this author discusses the use of acellular dermis grafts for foot and ankle applications including wound healing, tendon and ligament repair and soft tissue supplementation.

Resolving Skin Conditions

hmpadmin | 4,404 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2004

Are you looking for one cream that can combat several skin conditions? Salex™ Cream may be just what your patients need. It utilizes 6% salicylic acid to fight hyperkeratotic skin disorders, such as keratosis plantaris, ichthyosis and psoriasis, according to Healthpoint, the product’s manufacturer. The cream helps facilitate the removal of excess keratin and the company also notes that the product has a new Multivesicular Emulsion System (MVE™). This MVE technology aids in hydration, lubrication and improving blood flow in the skin.

Using Injectable Grafts To Facilitate Implant Success

By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM, Jodi Schoenhaus, DPM, and Dawn Pfeiffer, DPM | 5,587 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/2003

One of the most commonly performed procedures in the foot is an implant arthroplasty of the first metatarsophalangeal (MPJ) joint. However, we have occasionally noted a hollow medullary canal after resecting the base of the proximal phalanx. This can cause problems with incorporation of the implant. Yet there is an intraoperative option one can use to address this problem. Adequate bone stock of the proximal phalanx is crucial for proper seating of the hemi-implant. In some cases, we have found the cancellous bone to be cystic with liquefied fat.

Addressing Skin Tension With Biopsies

hmpadmin | 5,082 reads | 0 comments | 06/26/2009

   I would like to applaud Tracey Vlahovic, DPM, for her article entitled “A Guide to Biopsy Techniques for Skin Neoplasms” (see page 50–56 in the May issue of Podiatry Today). Any information that turns attention to the skin biopsy in podiatric literature is sorely needed.

How To Handle Common Skin Dermatoses

By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD | 25,623 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2002

Dermatoses of the lower extremities are fairly common.1 These conditions include infectious, inflammatory, vascular, neoplastic and traumatic dermatoses. Many dermatologic conditions (i.e. psoriasis, lichen planus) that exhibit the potential for widespread distribution can be prone to occur on the legs, ankles or feet in some patients. Other disorders characteristically involve the lower extremities. For example, dyshidrotic eczema and pitted keratolysis are examples of dermatoses that involve the plantar surface of the foot.

Identifying Skin Conditions Of Diabetic Patients

By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM | 7,557 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2002

Many people with diabetes develop skin manifestations as a result of having the disease. In some instances, such skin problems may be the first sign that the patient has diabetes. Proper recognition is the key to successful treatment, but making the proper diagnosis can be difficult. Some conditions may have similar characteristics and presentations. With this in mind, test your diagnostic acumen with the following case.

Essential Insights On Using Skin Substitutes

hmpadmin | 12,622 reads | 1 comments | 10/21/2010

Skin substitutes, which are also called bioengineered alternative tissues (BAT), are becoming more commonly used to help facilitate wound closure. Accordingly, our expert panelists discuss indications for these modalities and the timing of their use. They also weigh the benefits of skin substitutes versus skin grafts.

Can Daptomycin Have An Impact With Skin And Skin Structure Infections?

By Gerard Guerin, DPM, CWS | 10,231 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2008

Podiatrists commonly encounter and treat skin and skin-structure infections (SSSIs), ranging from cellulitis to more complicated surgical site infections and infected diabetic foot ulcers. Aerobic gram-positive cocci, such as Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci, are the most common causative agents of skin infections.1

Can Daptomycin Have An Impact With Skin And Skin Structure Infections?

By Gerard Guerin, DPM, CWS | 16,282 reads | 0 comments | 10/27/2007

Podiatrists commonly encounter and treat skin and skin-structure infections (SSSIs), ranging from cellulitis to more complicated surgical site infections and infected diabetic foot ulcers.