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Dressing Facilitates Wound Healing Principles For A Variety Of Ulcers

By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor | 5,211 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2006

   When looking for a wound care product that offers antimicrobial properties, provides effective debridement and facilitates a moist wound care environment, podiatrists may want to consider the AmeriGel Wound Dressing. As if these benefits were not enough, one can use the dressing to treat a variety of wounds, including diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, post-surgical incisions and first- and second-degree burns.    R. Daniel Davis, DPM, says the topical medication is an affordable and effective option in his armamentarium.

How To Manage Heel Ulcers In Patients With Diabetes

By Jonathan Moore, DPM, and Pamela Jensen, DPM | 51,190 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2005

   Diabetic heel ulcers constitute one of the most frustrating problems for podiatric physicians. Pressure ulcers affect nearly 2 million people each year and account for annual healthcare costs that range between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion.

Tendon Lengthening: Is It A Viable Option For Forefoot Ulcers?

By J. Monroe Laborde, MD, MS | 24,422 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2005

   Approximately 3 percent of the United States population has diagnosed diabetes mellitus.1 Diabetic foot problems, however, are the leading cause of amputation.2,3 The risk of amputation is 15 times greater in patients with diabetes than in other people.2 Up to 15 percent of patients with diabetes will require amputation.1,3 Over 50,000 amputations in patients with diabetes occur annually in the U.S.4 In one study of patients with diabetes mellitus, 84 percent of lower extremity amputations were preceded by foot ulcers.2

Can Microcirculation Changes Predict Non-Healing Ulcers?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 19,334 reads | 0 comments | 01/03/2006

   Researchers of a recent study say assessing microcirculation changes may help predict whether diabetic foot ulcers will heal. The authors of the study, which was published in a recent issue of The Lancet, utilized medical hyperspectral imaging to perform these assessments and add that the new technology may help identify patients with diabetes who are at higher risk for foot ulcers.    Researchers of the study examined 108 patients, including 51 patients with diabetic neuropathy, 36 with diabetes but no neuropathy and 21 control patients without diabetes.

Current Options In Treating Chronic Venous Ulcers

By Michael Baker, DPM, CWS | 10,599 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2004

As foot and ankle surgeons, we are constantly reminded that we are the ultimate champions of diabetic foot care. However, another emerging problem is chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) ulcerations. While it does not have nearly the potential impact of limb loss one may see with complications from the diabetic foot, there is an increasing incidence of CVI with the continued aging of the population. According to current estimates, CVI affects between 0.1 and 0.3 percent of the total population in the United States. The healthcare industry spends $400 million annually on treating CVI.

Key Insights On Managing Infected Diabetic Ulcers

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 15,221 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2004

Assessing and treating infected diabetic foot wounds can be challenging. Providing timely treatment is essential given the potential complications of diabetic foot infections but the rise in antibiotic resistance is a key issue to consider. With this in mind, our expert panelists discuss a variety of issues, ranging from empiric antibiotic selection and MRSA infected wounds to their approach in diagnosing osteomyelitis. Q: What empiric antibiotics do you utilize for the infected neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer?

When Diabetic Foot Ulcers Can Be Managed At Home

By Ronald A. Sage, DPM | 42,621 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2004

Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes can be expected to develop ulceration in their lifetime, thus putting them at risk for lower extremity amputation. Treatment for infected diabetic foot wounds accounts for one quarter of all diabetic hospital admissions in the United States and Great Britain.1-3 Patient education, proper footgear and regular foot examination can decrease the frequency and severity of ulceration.

Treating Venous Stasis Ulcers In The Lower Extremity

By Mark Beylin, DPM | 47,039 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2004

Chronic venous insufficiency is a significant disease that affects as much as 25 percent of the population in the United States. It is also a condition commonly treated by podiatric physicians. The condition results in blood pooling in the venous system of the lower extremities (see “A Guide To Normal Venous Anatomy And Physiology below). Venous stasis ulcers are the end stage of chronic venous insufficiency. In order to treat venous stasis ulceration, one must have a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of venous disease.

Inside Insights For Offloading Diabetic Neuropathic Ulcers

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 12,300 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2004

Offloading diabetic neuropathic ulcers comes with a unique set of treatment challenges. Some consider total contact casting the gold standard but whether it’s practical in a busy practice is highly debatable. Still, how can one arrive at a solution that will enhance patient compliance? With these issues in mind, our expert panelists share their thoughts and experiences with this topic. Q: How do you initially offload the plantar diabetic neuropathic ulcer? A: Lawrence G.

A Guide To Preventative Offloading Of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Jason R. Hanft, DPM, Daniel T. Hall IV, DPM, and Ashish Kapila, DPM | 47,181 reads | 1 comments | 11/21/2011

Given the repetitive microtrauma experienced by patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, proper offloading is critical to the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. Accordingly, these authors explore the potential of total contact casts, Charcot restraint orthotic walkers and other offloading devices, and discuss key factors that affect patient adherence.