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Can A Novel Felt Pad Help Offload Plantar Ulcers?

Tracey Vlahovic DPM | 7,369 reads | 1 comments | 10/29/2012

On my recent journey to the Society for Chiropodists and Podiatrists 100th Anniversary Conference and Exhibition in Glasgow, Scotland, I saw the exhibit hall display for Hapla (Cuxson Gerrard) felt. My U.K. mentor, Dr M. Tariq Khan, PhD, uses this in his podiatric clinic. When I spent time training with Dr. Khan years ago, he introduced me to the Hapla 3D system.

Emerging Insights On Ex-Fix Offloading For Diabetic Foot Ulcers

William P. Grant, DPM, FACFAS, Lisa M. Grant, and Bryan R. Barbato, BS | 12,503 reads | 0 comments | 03/25/2013

It is well understood that unremitting pressure is a major etiologic factor in both the creation and persistence of diabetic foot ulcers. Sensory neuropathy in combination with autonomic and motor neuropathy readily produces foot deformities with bony prominences and skin lacking normal protective sensibility. Further complicating the problem, alteration in tendon morphology and its function produces increased plantar pressures as well as temporal alteration in the phasic gait cycle that can destroy the protective barrier of the skin beneath the foot.

Is High Pressure Better Than Low Pressure For NPWT?

Quan Ngo, MBBS(Hons), Anand Deva, BSc(Med), MBBS(Hons), MS, FRACS, and Ryan Fitzgerald, DPM, AACFAS | 29,716 reads | 0 comments | 07/22/2010
Yes. These authors say high pressure NPWT can positively affect edematous wounds or unstable wounds, and works well with hydrophilic dressings or barrier dressings.

By Quan Ngo, MBBS(Hons), and Anand Deva, BSc(Med), MBBS(Hons), MS, FRACS

Over a decade ago, Fleischmann, Morykwas and their respective colleagues first introduced negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT).1,2 Their early work confirmed the effectiveness of NPWT in enhancing healing in both human and animal models.

What A New Study Reveals About Tendon Lengthening For Diabetic Plantar Foot Ulcers

Monroe Laborde, MD | 28,985 reads | 0 comments | 10/25/2012

Presenting the results of a recent retrospective study and offering a review of the related literature, this author says tendon lengthening compares favorably to other modalities in terms of efficacy and reduced complications.

A Closer Look At Acellular Dermal Matrices For Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Andrew H. Rice, DPM, FACFAS, and Mallory Przbylski, DPM | 12,499 reads | 0 comments | 10/26/2012

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), greater than 60 percent of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations occur in patients with diabetes.1 It is clear one can attribute this to diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), soft tissue infection and osteomyelitis. Wounds that are arrested in the chronic phase of healing become susceptible to soft tissue and bone infection, and subsequent amputation.2 This knowledge underscores the need for production of better wound care techniques and products in order to heal DFUs in a timely manner.

Are Acellular Dermal Matrices Effective For Grade 0 Ulcers And Fat Pad Augmentation?

Jodi Schoenhaus Gold, DPM, FACFAS | 17,202 reads | 0 comments | 10/26/2012

Fat pad augmentation or the use of grafting in the ball of the foot and the heel has gained popularity over the past decade. The goal is simply to add cushioning or padding to areas that demonstrate a loss or displacement of natural fat due to an increased peak pressure.

What The Evidence Reveals About Midfoot Ulcers In Patients With Diabetes

Valerie Schade, DPM, AACFAS | 16,505 reads | 0 comments | 03/25/2013

Given the long-term challenges with conservative care and high recurrence risk associated with diabetic midfoot ulcers, this author examines the literature on surgical procedures including the exostectomy and realignment arthrodesis.

Emphasizing a Proactive Multidisciplinary Approach To The Combination Of Neuropathic Ulcers And Peripheral Arterial Disease

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 3,646 reads | 0 comments | 10/24/2012

Joe Mills, MD, and I, along with many of our colleagues, have been struck with how our population has changed but our methods (and language) have not. We discussed this previously in a dendrogram (cluster analysis) from a study I co-authored with Lavery and Peters in 2008. (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18593392 ).

Mastering Difficult Heel Ulcers

By Robert J. Snyder, DPM, CWS, and Heather Perrigo, RN | 38,700 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2002

Pressure ulcer disease represents a significant medical problem both nationally and internationally. Approximately 1.7 million people in the United States develop these maladies at an annual cost of between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion.1 With the population aging, assisted living and nursing facilities flourishing and obesity creating catastrophic increases in diabetes and other diseases, it is likely the number of ulcerations will continue to increase.

Expert Pointers On Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 31,025 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2007

Given the increasing use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) to spur wound healing, our expert panelists return for the second part of this Q&A discussion on NPWT (see “Inside Insights On Negative Pressure Wound Therapy,” page 24, May issue). They offer specific pearls on the use of NPWT, how to combine the modality with skin grafts and silver dressings, and tips for avoiding wound maceration. Q: Do you have any pearls for using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)? A: Eric Travis, DPM, utilizes VAC therapy (KCI) mostly at 125 mmHg of continuous suction.