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Are DPMs Underusing The TCC To Offload Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 1,989 reads | 0 comments | 07/15/2014

Despite the evidence supporting the efficacy of total contact casts (TCC) to offload diabetic foot ulcers, podiatric physicians may not be putting this evidence into practice, according to a recent study.

Can Ultrasound Debridement Facilitate Biofilm Removal From Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

Melinda Bowlby, DPM, and Peter Blume, DPM, FACFAS | 9,719 reads | 0 comments | 07/23/2014

A patient with diabetes mellitus has a 15 to 25 percent chance of developing a diabetic foot ulcer during his or her lifetime.1 Once the patient with diabetes develops an ulcer, there is an even higher rate of ulcer recurrence at 50 to 70 percent over five years.1    Diabetic foot ulcers are n

Are We Making Progress In Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 3,275 reads | 0 comments | 10/17/2014

Acknowledging the high failure rate in healing diabetic foot ulcers and preventing lower extremity amputations, a recent study in Advances in Therapy acknowledges an “urgent need for new treatment strategies.”1 Are we meeting that need or has our progress halted?

Emerging Insights On Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Karen Shum, DPM, and Kazu Suzuki, DPM, CWS | 21,019 reads | 1 comments | 07/23/2013

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become an indispensable tool for wound care for many physicians. These authors examine the research on NPWT, evaluate the newest devices on the market and provide guidance for getting reimbursement.

Exploring New Technologies For Healing Wounds And Diabetic Foot Ulcers

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 5,580 reads | 0 comments | 09/20/2013

At the University of Arizona Medical Center, we are recruiting patients for two studies, among many others, that may have the potential to lead to improved healing of wounds and diabetic foot ulcers.

The first study involves a spray-on skin solution. The technology works in a similar way to bioengineered tissues. The big difference is that because it has a spray-on quality, the skin solution can go over a larger surface area and perhaps the contact with wounds and delivery may be better than previous iterations.

Essential Principles In Treating Diabetic Forefoot Ulcers

Jason R. Hanft, DPM, FACFAS, Daniel Hall, DPM, and Mikkel Jarman, DPM | 17,962 reads | 0 comments | 07/24/2013

In addition to emphasizing the correlation between gait abnormalities and diabetic forefoot ulcerations, these authors discuss the impact of equinus and motor sensory neuropathy, how diabetes affects wound healing and keys to successful offloading.

Osteomyelitis And Heel Ulcers: What You Should Know

Eric J. Lullove, DPM, CWS | 36,382 reads | 0 comments | 07/25/2013

Mindful of the limb-threatening consequences that can arise if one does not properly diagnose and treat calcaneal osteomyelitis, this author examines the most effective modalities for diagnosing the bone infection, as well as non-invasive and surgical treatments.

Current Perspectives On Dressings, Tunneling Wounds And Infected Ulcers

Clinical Editor: Kazu Suzuki, DPM, CWS | 18,901 reads | 0 comments | 08/20/2013

Offering insights on dressing dispensing and obtaining a level of debridement with dressings, these panelists also share their thoughts on wounds ranging from deep tunneling wounds to infected ulcerations in the lower extremity.

Amniotic Membrane: Does It Have Promise For Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

Karen Shum, DPM, and Lee C. Rogers, DPM | 15,433 reads | 2 comments | 05/23/2013

The prevalence of diabetes, estimated at 14 percent in 2010, is projected to increase to 21 percent of adults in the United States by 2050.1 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has projected that as many as one out of three U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue.1

Can Phenytoin Help Heal Diabetic And Venous Ulcers?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS | 8,818 reads | 0 comments | 06/20/2013

Extemporaneous compounding offers the ability to individualize treatment for the specific needs of each patient. Frequently, compounding allows the creation of topical preparations that are otherwise not commercially available. Topical preparations can provide increased concentration within the wound as they have the ability to alter local wound dynamics and chronic wound physiology without systemic modification of the selected agents.1