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A Closer Look At Treating Plantar Fasciitis

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 5,763 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2005

   There is no doubt that podiatrists see quite a bit of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis accounts for 11 to 15 percent of all foot symptoms in adults, according to an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine last year. As Stephen Barrett, DPM, points out in his cover story, “A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies” (see page 36), projected estimates indicate that greater than two million patients per year are diagnosed with heel pain in the United States.    However, despite the prevalence of this condition, there are complex anatomical considerations.

Plantar Fasciitis: How To Maximize Outcomes With Conservative Therapy

By Brian Fullem, DPM | 43,981 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/2006

Plantar fasciitis is often inaccurately referred to as “heel spur syndrome.” Clinicians should no longer use this terminology. Most of the time, the presence or absence of a plantar calcaneal spur has no effect on symptoms or treatment. The term fasciitis may also be a misnomer. Lemont studied the pathology of 50 patients who underwent fascial release surgery.1 The findings did not show any evidence of inflammatory cells within the fascia. The common finding was degeneration of the tissue.

Point-Counterpoint: Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis: Is Fasciotomy Ever Necessary?

Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA, and Kevin A. Kirby, DPM | 18,529 reads | 1 comments | 10/24/2011
This author says there is still a very important role for plantar fasciotomy in the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciopathy, citing high success rates and minimal complications.

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA

Assessing The Role Of Radiofrequency Nerve Ablation For Plantar Fasciitis

Adam Landsman, DPM, FACFAS, PhD | 44,434 reads | 0 comments | 10/26/2011

In recent years, radiofrequency nerve ablation has emerged as a potential modality for plantar fasciitis. Accordingly, this author details his experience in using radiofrequency nerve ablation, provides a closer look at the literature and compares the modality to other treatments for heel pain.

Why Orthotics Are Not The Answer For Plantar Fasciitis

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS | 105,269 reads | 9 comments | 05/23/2011

There are approximately 2 million documented cases of plantar fasciitis per year in the United States. For most podiatrists, this is the most common foot pathology we see in our practices.1 The “sacred cow” in the podiatric community for plantar fasciitis has always been custom orthoses.

Resistant Plantar Fasciitis: Why We Should Opt For A Gastrocnemius Recession Before Even Considering A Plantar Fasciotomy

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS | 13,467 reads | 2 comments | 11/22/2011

It is a rare occasion in one’s professional career to experience a paradigm shift in philosophy, even if it is on just one topic. Plantar fasciitis is the most common condition I see on a daily basis. Up to 85 percent of the time, I am able to treat it conservatively. For the past 20 years, when it came to patients who did not respond to conservative treatment or did not have associated nerve entrapment, I have done a plantar fasciotomy.

The grid pattern on the foot indicates the point of greatest tenderness in relation to plantar fascia pain. Use of a 0.062 K-wire or 18-gauge needle to penetrate through the skin and fat to the level of fascia.

A Closer Look At A New Algorithm For Treating Plantar Fasciitis

By Babak Baravarian, DPM, and Bora Rhim, DPM | 21,067 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2007

In the United States, at least 10 percent of the population experiences heel pain secondary to plantar fasciitis. Reportedly, 600,000 outpatient visits to medical professionals a year are due to plantar fasciitis.1 According to a 2003 study, plantar fasciitis frequently occurs in people who are on their feet most of the day, those who are obese and those who have limited ankle dorsiflexion.2

Is Low-Energy ESWT Better Than High-Energy ESWT For Plantar Fasciitis?

Lowell Weil Jr., DPM, MBA, FACFAS and David Zuckerman, DPM | 37,148 reads | 0 comments | 10/26/2009

   

Yes. Lowell Weil Jr., DPM, MBA, FACFAS cites emerging research on low-energy ESWT and says it can be a cost-effective treatment for plantar fasciitis and other conditions.

   When musculoskeletal extracorporeal shockwave (ESWT) was introduced in the United States with its first FDA approval in 2000, there was a great deal of controversy and posturing among manufacturers of ESWT technologies. Each company was determined to create an exclusive market for itself at the expense of its competition.

Reminding Patients About Soleus Muscle Stretching To Help Counteract Plantar Fasciitis

Jenny L Sanders DPM | 11,523 reads | 0 comments | 02/29/2012

An American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) Podiatric Practice Survey of nearly 3,000 podiatrists found that plantar fasciitis/heel pain was the most commonly treated condition.1 A longtime hypothesis is that reduced ankle dorsiflexion is the most important risk factor for the development of plantar fasciitis.2 Decreased ankle dorsiflexion secondary to a tight Achilles tendon may lead to compensatory pronation of the foot, which can contribute to plantar fasciitis.3

Do Advances In Plantar Fasciitis Treatment Hold Up To Scientific Scrutiny?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS | 13,868 reads | 7 comments | 04/27/2010

I am constantly amazed at the variety of treatment modalities that are effective for plantar fasciitis. In fact, I am amazed when a modality exists that is not effective for plantar fasciitis. Just think about all that you learn at conferences, see in exhibit halls and read in non-peer reviewed journals. You would have to be an idiot not to be able to cure plantar fasciitis.