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Here one can see a community-acquired MRSA infection in a college athlete with excoriation. Repeated close physical contacts and skin injuries such as cuts and abrasions put athletes at an increased risk for CA-MRSA infections.

How To Recognize And Treat Community-Acquired MRSA

Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Carmen B. April, DPM | 31,995 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2008

In the past few months, we have heard numerous reports in the news about a “new super bug” that is resistant to conventional antibiotics and is sweeping through high school sports locker rooms and classrooms. The alleged new super bug is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and, more specifically, community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). However, MRSA is not a new type of bacteria that has suddenly appeared in the community. The organism has actually been around for quite a few decades.

Raising Questions About The Treatment Of MRSA In Hospitals

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD | 2,993 reads | 0 comments | 06/16/2009

I am fascinated at the current nationwide trend we see in our hospitals toward precautions for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Much of this trend in the United States has been sparked by last year's “present on admission” criteria from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) that limited reimbursement for the increased complexity of treating these patients if the infection was not “present on admission.”

Here one can see an MRSA abscess. (Photo courtesy of David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD)

Key Considerations With Diagnosing And Treating MRSA

Allen Mark Jacobs, DPM, FACFAS, FAPWCA | 25,006 reads | 0 comments | 07/27/2009

Given the challenges of hospital-acquired strains as well as the emergence of community-acquired strains of MRSA, this author discusses clinical, practical and medicolegal aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

Here one can see MRSA of the heel after wound debridement.The patient received linezolid postoperatively.

A Guide To Current And Emerging Antibiotics For MRSA

Eliza Addis-Thomas, DPM, Jon Key, DPM, FACFAS and Peter A. Blume, DPM, FACFAS | 66,169 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2008

Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen that can result in everything from minor skin infections to osteomyelitis, bacteremia, endocarditis and pneumonia.1 In podiatry, infections with Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are something physicians see on a daily basis.

Exploring Current And Emerging Treatments For MRSA

hmpadmin | 7,656 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2008

Dr. Armstrong: While vancomycin is commonly used for MRSA infections and perceived by most as a “big gun” antibiotic, it has its problems, doesn’t it?

Can A New Molecular Test Enhance MRSA Detection?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 8,089 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Given the substantial rates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in hospitals, early detection is vital to ensure timely and appropriate treatment. A new molecular test may significantly decrease the amount of time it takes to detect MRSA and possibly reduce transmission of the bacteria, according to the authors of a new study. Researchers who conducted the two-year study, recently published in Critical Care, evaluated over 1,000 patients who had been admitted for longer than 24 hours to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) or surgical ICU.

MRSA: Where Do We Go From Here?

By David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc, PhD | 58,998 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2005

   Foot ulcers are a major predictor of future lower limb amputations. Fourteen to 24 percent of patients with diabetes with foot ulcers eventually require an amputation and more than 60 percent of nontraumatic lower extremity amputations occur in those with diabetes.1,2 Although risk factors may vary, the majority of diabetes-related amputations result from peripheral arterial disease, peripheral neuropathy or infection.3    The healthcare costs associated with diabetic foot infections are staggering.

Experts Weigh In On Continued Rise Of MRSA

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 7,407 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2004

   Methicillin resistant Staph aureus (MRSA) infections are on the rise around the world as infections pass between hospitals and the community. The infections are not only associated with morbidity and mortality but also pose a high financial cost to patients and the healthcare profession, according to experts. What is causing the rise in antibiotic resistance and what steps should DPMs take to prevent and combat infection?

What Do The IDSA MRSA Guidelines Recommend For Bone And Joint Infections?

Warren S. Joseph DPM FIDSA | 6,170 reads | 0 comments | 01/27/2011

For part two of this posting on the new Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) guidelines, I would like to comment on some of the executive summary points made about MRSA bone and joint infections. I will use a similar format as before with posting the actual text and then adding my comments in italics.

Raising Concerns About the Vancomycin Dosing Recommendations In The IDSA MRSA Guidelines

Warren S. Joseph DPM FIDSA | 7,746 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2011

For part three of this posting on the new Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) guidelines, I would like to comment on some of the executive summary points made about vancomycin dosing recommendations. I will use a similar format as before with posting the actual text and then adding my comments in italics.