Search

A Guide To Conservative Treatment For Heel Pain

By John Mozena, DPM | 15,817 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2003

Plantar fasciitis is certainly one of the most common conditions we see in podiatric practice and more than 90 percent of patients are cured with conservative treatment.1 It sounds relatively simple. Well, in order to consistently facilitate successful outcomes, not only must one have a strong anatomical understanding of the plantar fascia, there must also be a strong command of the various causes of the condition, key diagnostic indicators and when to apply various treatment solutions in the armamentarium.

Key Insights On Diagnosing Heel Pain In Kids

By Russell G. Volpe, DPM | 43,358 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2004

The adult patient often seeks professional help with pain or discomfort in the foot. Pediatric consultations with a foot and ankle specialist are less often pain-related with concerns about gait or positional abnormalities more likely. When pain is the initiating complaint, it usually occurs in the child’s heel. However, the differential diagnosis of heel pain in the child can be challenging for practitioners. It may be difficult to obtain an accurate history from a child and parents are only able to relate what the child has told them or what they have observed.

Current Insights On Conservative Care For Heel Pain

Tim Dutra, DPM, MS | 14,528 reads | 1 comments | 10/21/2010

Emphasizing the importance of addressing the cause as well as the symptoms of heel pain, this author shares tips and pearls from his clinical experience on conservative modalities ranging from corticosteroid injections and taping to physical therapy and night splints.

A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies Of Heel Pain

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA | 90,468 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2005

   While heel pain is the most common condition podiatrists see in practice, heel pain can often be complex and occasionally difficult to treat.1 In recent years, we have seen the introduction of new treatments as logical conservative preludes to fasciotomy, including extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injection of the plantar fascia with autologous growth factors and coblation therapy.2    Clinicians are able to employ some of these modalities, such as autologous growth factors, due to a better understanding of the true histological and physiological etiologic mechanis

A Stepwise Approach To Treating Chronic Heel Pain

By Lisa M. Schoene, DPM, ATC | 76,279 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2005

   Given the common incidence of heel pain, patients may present to the office with symptoms that have been present anywhere between two or three weeks to perhaps two or three years. Often, these patients have already consulted with another clinician who had an incorrect approach to treatment. When the pain does not resolve, the patient may feel that he or she has to undergo an unnecessary surgical procedure.    This is unfortunate as the problem may be due to improper care.

Raising Questions About ESWT In Heel Pain Article

hmpadmin | 6,828 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/2004

First, I’d like to say that the article on adult-acquired flatfoot (AAF) was insightful and thorough (see the cover story “A New Approach To Adult-Acquired Flatfoot,” pg. 32, May issue). It is now my reference on AAF. However, I found that the heel pain article left questions unanswered (see “Conquering Conservative Care For Heel Pain,” pg. 48, May issue). I wonder why James Losito, DPM, offered his comments on Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) while having very limited knowledge of ESWT. Out of the three methods of generating shockwave, Dr. Losito only describes one.

A Guide To Conservative Care For Heel Pain

Christopher Corwin, DPM | 52,645 reads | 0 comments | 10/21/2011

More often than not, patients with plantar fasciitis have already attempted to resolve the condition on their own before they come into your office. This author explores a range of effective conservative treatments, investigates the potential of physical therapy and offers pointers on getting patients to stretch in the appropriate manner to help relieve plantar fasciitis.

When it comes to patients with plantar fasciitis, the author commonly refers patients to physical therapists or prescribes physical therapy to help train patients on proper stretching techniques. Then he monitors their compliance over a span of time. (Pho

A Closer Look At Practice Management Aspects Of Treating Heel Pain

By Lowell Weil Jr., DPM, MBA | 23,345 reads | 0 comments | 02/03/2008

Heel pain is the single most common reason that patients seek out the care of podiatric physicians. Estimates state that more than 15 million Americans suffer with heel pain and emerging technologies for treatment have ballooned over the past seven years. However, many of these technologies are expensive and may not be covered by all insurance companies.

When Neurosensory Testing Can Help Pinpoint The Cause Of Heel Pain

By David Soomekh, DPM and Babak Baravarian, DPM | 15,165 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2004

While there are many different causes of primary heel pain, it is often misdiagnosed as simple plantar fasciitis without the proper diagnostic tools. This is especially true for patients who have recurring symptoms and/or have failed multiple conservative and or surgical treatments. It takes a conscientious clinician to know when to begin thinking of a different diagnosis and a new course of treatment. This is especially true when it comes to heel pain.

Dumb And Dumber: Questioning Risky Treatment In A Case Of Posterior Heel Pain

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS | 8,689 reads | 3 comments | 06/15/2011

In reviewing medical records, I often wonder why some doctors will place themselves into an arena that invites malpractice actions.

Let me present an example, a recent case that I reviewed for a plaintiff. Although I did not feel that there was malpractice in this case, I did find the treatment of the patient interesting.

A relatively healthy middle-aged female consulted a podiatrist for posterior heel pain. She had no prior treatment. Her medical history was significant for controlled hypertension and low thyroid function.