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Understanding The Biomechanics Of Subtalar Joint Arthroereisis

Kevin A. Kirby, DPM | 52,848 reads | 1 comments | 03/22/2011

Is a commonly utilized classification scheme for subtalar arthroereisis implants “biomechanically inaccurate and ambiguous”? With a thorough review of the literature, this author discusses kinematic and kinetic functions of the subtalar joint, and the biomechanical effects of the subtalar arthroereisis procedure.

Comparing Lessons On Biomechanics And The Realities Of Clinical Experience

Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM | 10,767 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Although what one learned in podiatric medical school is invaluable in a podiatry career, sometimes podiatrists may encounter a different reality in clinical practice. These expert panelists weigh what they learned in school with their experience and the current research. They also detail which directions future orthotic research should take. Q: What is the current research telling us about how the foot really functions as opposed to what many podiatrists were taught in school?

Can Orthotics Address The Faulty Biomechanics Of Metatarsalgia?

Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM | 39,767 reads | 1 comments | 06/03/2005

   Metatarsalgia is one of the more commonly seen complaints in any podiatry practice. Common treatments for the disorder include ice, removable metatarsal pads, antiinflammatories, injected steroids and physical therapy. While such treatments often completely resolve an acute bout of metatarsalgia, they often do nothing to remedy the true underlying biomechanical causes of the problem.    To correct the faulty foot biomechanics, DPMs rely on custom foot orthotics.

Redefining Biomechanics Of The Foot And Ankle

By Christopher Nester, BSc (Hons), PhD, Andrew Findlow, BSc (Hons), Anmin Liu, BSc (Hons), Erin Ward, DPM, and Jay Cocheba, DPM | 29,040 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2005

   When it comes to the load-bearing joints of the lower limb, the foot is the least understood. This stems from the fact that its size is a major barrier to quality scientific investigation but is also partly due to the the misconception that its function is simple. While we may believe we know a great deal about the biomechanics of the foot and ankle, in reality, it is relatively uncharted territory compared to the knee and hip.    The foot is far from simple as it comprises hundreds of different ligaments and bony structures and scores of articulations.

Readers Share Their Views On Biomechanics Editorial

hmpadmin | 4,291 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2004

I thoroughly enjoy reading Podiatry Today each month. It is an excellent learning tool for a student. However, upon reading the recent Editor’s Perspective column (see “Are Biomechanics Emphasized Enough In Podiatric Education?” page 18, August issue), I found your survey of the schools to be somewhat misleading. Having just begun my third year at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, I have already completed two semesters of biomechanics.

Are Biomechanics Emphasized Enough In Podiatric Education?

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 2,904 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2004

There is a prevailing notion that most podiatric students want to become accomplished podiatric surgeons as opposed to “experts in biomechanics of the foot.” However, educators and authors strongly emphasize the biomechanical knowledge of form and function as essential to being a successful podiatrist. “Biomechanical training sets podiatrists apart from other disciplines that treat the feet,” notes one established biomechanics author. It is also the critical foundation for those who wish to become podiatric surgeons.

Challenging Conventional Thinking On Orthotic Therapy And Podiatric Biomechanics

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 3,931 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2006

Every now and then, I catch an episode of Bravo’s Inside The Actor’s Studio. At the end of the hour, the interviewee participates in a pithy, amusing and sometimes revealing questionnaire. One of the standard questions is “What is your least favorite word?” For me, it would be two words: conventional and assumption. Those who assume are too lazy to seek out the truth. Conventional implies there is one predominant way of doing things but the dynamic nature of our lives suggests different models.

What Happened To Continuing Education For Podiatric Biomechanics?

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS | 5,785 reads | 4 comments | 11/18/2011

While doing background research for this blog, I originally intended to focus on the reasons why topics relating to biomechanics have vanished from presentations at major podiatric conferences around the country. I wanted to review the lecture schedules from last year as well as upcoming meetings in 2012 to make sure that I was correct regarding the dearth of biomechanics lectures.

Where Can The Foot And Ankle Surgeon Go For Continuing Education On Biomechanics?

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS | 4,188 reads | 0 comments | 02/08/2010

The last time I checked, there were no lectures devoted to biomechanics at the upcoming American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) Scientific Conference in Las Vegas (Feb. 22 to 26).

I continue to be amazed that our profession would stage a conference that advertises “cutting edge clinical and practice management topics,” and ignores the vital role that biomechanics plays in foot and ankle surgery. Our counterparts at the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) devote almost one-third of the lectures at its annual meeting to biomechanics topics.

Understanding The Potential Impact Of Diabetes On Bone Biology And Biomechanics

By Glenn Weinraub, DPM | 17,957 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2006

It is well established that poorly controlled diabetes mellitus leads to vasculopathy, immunopathy and neuropathy, all of which may contribute to osteopathy. However, in order to understand the nuances of bone healing in the diabetic population, one must first have a strong grasp of the fundamentals of bone biology and biomechanics (see “A Helpful Primer On Bone Structure” below). Bone is a dynamic medium with a multifactorial purpose including support of soft tissues, protection of soft tissues, locomotion and being a mineral reservoir.