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A Key Resource For Recycling Running Shoes

Jenny L Sanders DPM | 5,950 reads | 0 comments | 12/27/2012

If you have patients with running shoes beyond their prime, you can refer them to the Nike Reuse-A-Shoe program at www.nikereuseashoe.com/ .

More than two decades ago, Nike began looking for a way to reduce the company's environmental footprint as well as the amount of shoes that ended up in landfills. Nike first started by collecting athletic shoes at key retail locations and shortly thereafter teamed up with other recycling centers to establish shoe collections in communities across the country. 

Athletic Footwear For Children

By Russell G. Volpe, DPM | 22,349 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2005

   Although the summer will soon be winding down, the activities of children dictate year-round use of athletic footwear. When assessing and treating pediatric patients, and answering the questions of their parents, clinicians often face the challenge of evaluating and recommending features in a good pediatric athletic shoe.    Certainly, using orthoses can help encourage normal development of the foot.

Here one can see an example of a shoe with poor flexion stability.The shoe should not flex across the midfoot.

Recommending Athletic Footwear For Runners

By Douglas Richie Jr., DPM | 22,966 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/2008

What is a good running shoe? How often are you asked this question? It seems that whenever a stranger learns that you are a podiatric physician, the first question he or she asks is about a shoe. Rather than asking how we can prevent foot amputations in patients with diabetes, the average American is more interested in what shoe a podiatrist is recommending.

This photo shows resupination prior to propulsion in an athlete with an increased arch.

Does Arch Height Affect Athletic Ability?

By Oghale Eleyae, DPM | 41,280 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/2008

     Among all the things that I learned during my sports medicine fellowship at the Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine, I became fascinated by one particular phenomenon. There seems to be a relationship between foot type and specific sporting events. After close observation and an ongoing study, I have noticed that athletes with tibia varum, cavus foot type and, sometimes, an in-toe gait tend to excel in sporting events that primarily involve quickness in acceleration, stop and go maneuvers, and cutting.

Key Principles To Evaluating Athletic Footwear

Mark Reeves, DPM | 22,654 reads | 1 comments | 08/19/2010

Whether it is fielding patient questions about the emerging rocker bottom shoes or addressing irritation of the forefoot due to the cosmetic material of running shoes, being able to understand, evaluate and recommend athletic footwear is essential. Accordingly, this author reviews four key shoe components, discusses principles of effective motion control and offers insights on walking shoes, cross-trainers and rocker bottom shoes.

Secrets To Billing For Diabetic Shoes

Marty Chalfin, CPed | 46,115 reads | 0 comments | 02/24/2011

Given the escalating prevalence of people with diabetes, chances are you will be seeing more and more patients in need of diabetic footwear. With this in mind, this author reviews recent changes in the Therapeutic Shoe Program for Diabetes and discusses how to navigate the paperwork trail to help ensure timely dispensing of shoes and appropriate reimbursement.

Key Insights On Recommending Running Shoes

By Peter Wilusz, DPM | 29,251 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/2005

   Believe it or not, the running shoe first originated as a leather upper with a leather sole. Adidas running shoes date back to the late 1800s but many of the technical advancements did not begin to appear until the 1970s. In 1971, Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight created a shoe manufacturing company called Blue Ribbon Sports (BRS), which eventually became Nike, Inc.    While he was coaching track and field at the University of Oregon, Bowerman created the first cushioned midsole by heating polyurethane on his wife’s waffle iron in his garage.

Do Running Shoes Still Need Heels?

Nicholas A Campitelli DPM FACFAS | 46,565 reads | 19 comments | 01/19/2012

Has anyone ever pondered the fact that almost every shoe we put on our feet contains a "heel”? This is true whether it is a $200 motion control running shoe or simply a dress shoe that has the ¾-inch heel to accommodate our perfectly hemmed slacks. Let's not leave out the eye catching high heels that we all tell our patients are biomechanically inappropriate.

Surprisingly, it's not simply 1 ½-inch pumps that can be wreaking havoc for our patients’ feet. It may very well be the majority of shoes that most of us are wearing.

Running shoes are lightest in weight and offer maximum cushioning. They are designed for linear activity and should never be worn for court activity.

Four Essential Keys To Athletic Shoe Fit

By Josh White, DPM, CPed | 61,952 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/2008

For professional athletes and weekend warriors alike, having the right shoe and the correct fit can mean the difference between participating and sitting on the sidelines. Since most podiatrists now fit shoes in their offices, it is imperative that they develop a true expertise in this critical aspect of foot care, particularly with respect to the special needs of athletes. Providing proper shoe fit and selection for active individuals holds great potential for both injury prevention and for practice expansion.

Four Essential Keys To Athletic Shoe Fit

By Josh White, DPM, CPed | 12,432 reads | 0 comments | 10/27/2007

For professional athletes and weekend warriors alike, having the right shoe and the correct fit can mean the difference between participating and sitting on the sidelines. Since most podiatrists now fit shoes in their offices, it is imperative that they develop a true expertise in this critical aspect of foot care, particularly with respect to the special needs of athletes. Providing proper shoe fit and selection for active individuals holds great potential for both injury prevention and for practice expansion.