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Is Arthrodesis The Answer For First MPJ Arthritis?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 8,713 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/2002

What is the best treatment approach for seniors who have painful arthritis in the first MPJ? Arthrodesis may provide significant pain relief for these patients, according to the results of a recent 29-patient study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS).

Study Shows Low Nonunion Rate For Arthrodesis

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 6,554 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2004

A new study on Lapidus arthrodesis presents some encouraging results. In a retrospective study of over 200 patients who underwent the Lapidus arthrodesis procedure, the researchers found only a 5.3 percent nonunion rate. The study, which was recently published in The Journal of Foot And Ankle Surgery (JFAS), assessed the results of a modified procedure, which emphasized joint curettage with subchondral plate preservation and screw fixation. The low nonunion rate is the most significant finding in the study, according to study co-author Lawrence Ford, DPM.

Balancing Digital Arthrodesis With Flexor Tendon Transfers And MPJ Corrections

Jerome A. Slavitt, DPM, FACFAS | 19,160 reads | 0 comments | 02/24/2011

Hammertoe correction, one of the mainstays of podiatric surgery, is not as simple and straightforward as one would think. A surgeon may schedule a hammertoe surgery and assume an arthroplasty will correct the deformity. The surgeon is thinking this procedure is quick, easy to perform and he or she will be in and out of the operating room in no time.

A Guide To First MPJ Arthrodesis For Active Patients

By Lawrence A. DiDomenico, DPM, and Alfonso A. Haro III, DPM | 66,154 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2005

   Surgical recommendations are sparse when evaluating treatment options for the athletic population diagnosed with hallux limitus, hallux rigidus or first metatarsophalangeal (MPJ) osteoarthritis. However, we have found success in treating athletes with first MPJ arthrodesis, and helping them to achieve pain relief and a return to activities.    Several surgeons have found similar success as evidenced by a review of the literature on this subject. In 1996, Bouche, et.

Why Patients May Prefer Arthrodesis With A New Screw

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 4,219 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/2004

Although performing digital arthrodesis on the lesser metatarsals with the traditional K-wire is reliable, patients may not be pleased with the prospect of a pin sticking out of their feet for several weeks after the procedure. A new screw offers compression, stability and perhaps an improved likelihood of patients enjoying the convenience of internal fixation. The Digital Compression Screw™ offers patients an alternative which they may find more cosmetically acceptable.

Emerging Insights On The First MPJ Arthrodesis

Shelby Swanson, BA, Andrea Dyack, BS, BA, and Michael S. Lee, DPM, FACFAS | 23,946 reads | 1 comments | 06/21/2011

Arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) was first advocated in 1894 by Clutton for severe, painful hallux valgus.1 McKeever refined the technique in 1952 using intramedullary screw fixation, which is currently the gold standard for treatment of advanced arthritis and/or significant deformities of the hallux.2 Common indications for arthrodesis include stage 3 hallux rigidus (osteoarthritis), rheumatoid arthritis, failed first MPJ implants, severe hallux valgus deformities and post-traumatic arthritis.3,4

Inside Insights On Ankle Replacement Surgery

Bob Baravarian, DPM | 13,477 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/2008

Ankle arthritis has been the subject of much research and researchers have made a great deal of progress in this area in the past 50 years. In the past, physicians primarily treated post-traumatic arthritis, which accounts for much of the cause of ankle arthritis, with casting. This often caused malalignment and poor articular position, resulting in rapid arthritis of the hindfoot and ankle.

Current Concepts In Ankle Arthroscopy

By Catherine Cheung, DPM | 34,333 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/2007

   Ankle arthroscopy is an extremely useful skill for a foot and ankle surgeon. Foot and ankle surgeons use ankle arthroscopies to treat a variety of problems, including osteochondral defects, loose osteochondral fragments, ankle impingement, post-traumatic fibrous bands, synovitis and ligamentous/capsular injuries.    Ankle arthroscopy has several advantages over an open ankle procedure. The surgery is minimally invasive and has a low complication rate. One can perform this on an outpatient basis and it facilitates a relatively easy postoperative recovery period.

Are Ankle Implants Worth Another Look?

By Mark H. Feldman, MS, DPM, and John Grady, DPM | 17,223 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/2003

Yes, Mark H. Feldman, MS, DPM, cites technical advances in the devices and promising results from studies. Diligent study of normal ankle biomechanics and review of previous implant failures has led to the development of a new generation of total ankle replacement (TAR) implants.

Identifying A Dancer's Chronic Ankle Pain

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 13,354 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/2002

A patient comes into the office with pain in the posterior aspect of her ankle. She doesn’t recall injuring the leg, but notes she has had the pain for over six months and that it is present at all times. An active dancer with the local ballet company, the patient adds that she experiences chronic pain when doing any form of dancing. She says the pain is far worse with high heels and ballet shoes en-pointe, but finds it more tolerable when wearing stable flat shoes. The pain is deeper than the superficial Achilles tendon region and does not radiate to any region.