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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • September 2008 | Volume 21 - Issue 9
    Here one can see an ischemic ulcer in a patient with diabetes. The authors say the endovascular approach to the ischemic diabetic foot has lead to a 96 percent one-year limb salvage rate at their institution. (Photo courtesy of Jonathan Moore, DPM, and Pa
    By Francesco Serino, MD, and Yimei Cao, MD
    7,257 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In the early 1980s, LoGerfo opened the window of limb salvage in critical stages of diabetic atherosclerosis by fighting the misconception of microangiopathy that had previously prevented attempts to bypass arterial lesions in diabetic foot.1 He produced evidence that revascularization of distal diabetic arterial occlusions can be successful. This evidence in turn gave a fundamental push to expand and improve techniques of distal bypass.2,3 ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    12,279 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Patients with venous ulcers can face daunting complications. Accordingly, our expert panelists provide pertinent pearls on diagnosis, compression therapy, debridement and how their patients have fared with vascular surgery procedures. Q: How do you approach/work up the patient with a chronic venous ankle ulcer? Is there any need for venous ultrasound studies? ... continue reading
    By Luke D. Cicchinelli, DPM, FACFAS
    15,783 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Learning and performing effective surgery is akin to studying and speaking a foreign language. Not every one does so with the same fluency. The patient often does not speak a single word. Anatomy is the vocabulary, surgical procedure selection is the syntax and some aspects like verb conjugation and internal fixation sequences simply have to be committed to memory. ... continue reading