Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • September 2008 | Volume 21 - Issue 9
    By Allen Mark Jacobs, DPM, FACFAS
    14,170 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Although commonly present in the patient with diabetes mellitus, motor neuropathy frequently goes undetected. Less dramatic in presentation than sensory neuropathy, the presence of motor deficit secondary to diabetic neuropathy is frequently not evaluated during examination and subsequently goes unrecognized. There is also not a great deal of literature regarding the effects of diabetes on motor function in the lower extremity. As a result, the effects of motor neuropathy on the foot and ankle frequently go unappreciated. Motor neuropathy in diabetes is common. A recent electrophysiologic stu... continue reading
    This photo shows a deep anterior ankle wound with exposed tendon eight days after GraftJacket application. Surgeons secured the graft with skin staples and treated the wound adjunctively with NPWT.
    By Nicholas J. Bevilacqua, DPM, and Robert M. Greenhagen, DPM
    20,801 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced that diabetes now affects nearly 24 million people in the United States. Foot ulcers will affect up to 25 percent of people with diabetes during their lifetime.1 People with diabetes have a 30-fold higher lifetime risk of undergoing a lower extremity amputation in comparison to those without diabetes.2 A foot ulcer precedes a lower extremity amputation 85 percent of the time.3 Diabetic foot problems are a major burden to society and come at great costs to the healthcare system. Prevention of fo... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    4,338 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Melanoma incidence has been on the rise in Caucasians, especially women, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Researchers speculate that this may be due to increasing ultraviolet ray exposure.    The authors analyzed Caucasian patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program between 1973 and 2004. Researchers calculated annual age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates of invasive cutaneous melanoma among men and women ages 15 to 39. ... continue reading