Volume 21 - Issue 9 - September 2008

News and Trends »

Study Points To Increase Of Melanoma Among Young Women

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 4114 reads | 0 comments

Melanoma incidence has been on the rise in Caucasians, especially women, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Researchers speculate that this may be due to increasing ultraviolet ray exposure.
   The authors analyzed Caucasian patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program between 1973 and 2004. Researchers calculated annual age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates of invasive cutaneous melanoma among men and women ages 15 to 39.



Diabetes Watch »

Have Endovascular Advances Reinvented Limb Salvage Expectations?

By Francesco Serino, MD, and Yimei Cao, MD | 6915 reads | 0 comments

In the early 1980s, LoGerfo opened the window of limb salvage in critical stages of diabetic atherosclerosis by fighting the misconception of microangiopathy that had previously prevented attempts to bypass arterial lesions in diabetic foot.1 He produced evidence that revascularization of distal diabetic arterial occlusions can be successful. This evidence in turn gave a fundamental push to expand and improve techniques of distal bypass.2,3



Wound Care Q&A »

Key Insights On Treating Chronic Venous Ulcers

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 11690 reads | 0 comments

Patients with venous ulcers can face daunting complications. Accordingly, our expert panelists provide pertinent pearls on diagnosis, compression therapy, debridement and how their patients have fared with vascular surgery procedures.

Q: How do you approach/work up the patient with a chronic venous ankle ulcer? Is there any need for venous ultrasound studies?



Surgical Pearls »

Practical Keys To Improving Fluency In Foot And Ankle Surgery

By Luke D. Cicchinelli, DPM, FACFAS | 15099 reads | 0 comments

Learning and performing effective surgery is akin to studying and speaking a foreign language. Not every one does so with the same fluency. The patient often does not speak a single word. Anatomy is the vocabulary, surgical procedure selection is the syntax and some aspects like verb conjugation and internal fixation sequences simply have to be committed to memory.



Feature »

How To Treat Turf Toe Injuries

By Bruce E. Williams, DPM | 57690 reads | 0 comments

Turf toe is primarily considered a sprain of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). The mechanism of turf toe injuries is a hyperextension of the first MPJ, which results in a sprain of the plantar joint capsule or a potential tear or rupture of the plantar capsule and ligaments.
   Common forefoot injuries similar in presentation to turf toe are non-specific trauma, Freiberg’s infraction, sesamoiditis, arthritis and soft tissue injury.



Feature »

A Closer Look At Motor Neuropathy In Patients With Diabetes

By Allen Mark Jacobs, DPM, FACFAS | 13273 reads | 0 comments

Although commonly present in the patient with diabetes mellitus, motor neuropathy frequently goes undetected. Less dramatic in presentation than sensory neuropathy, the presence of motor deficit secondary to diabetic neuropathy is frequently not evaluated during examination and subsequently goes unrecognized. There is also not a great deal of literature regarding the effects of diabetes on motor function in the lower extremity. As a result, the effects of motor neuropathy on the foot and ankle frequently go unappreciated.
Motor neuropathy in diabetes is common. A recent electrophysiologic stu