Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • July 2008 | Volume 21 - Issue 7
    AmeriGel (AmerX Health Care) contains Oakin™, an oak extract with natural tannins that have reportedly been proven to reduce infections and inflammation, and speed healing.
    Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    7,830 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/08
    Can the natural oak extract Oakin™ enhance the healing properties of a wound dressing? AmeriGel Wound Dressing (AmerX Health Care), which contains Oakin, has received high marks from podiatrists for its ability to promote healing, especially following nail surgeries. The company notes that AmeriGel Wound Dressing reduces wound bioburden through its antimicrobial and antifungal properties, and assists in debridement. The dressing also reportedly balances the mix of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitory matrix proteins (TIMPs) in the wound matrix ... continue reading
    This plantar midfoot wound failed to close after the placement of a split thickness skin graft.
    George Liu, DPM, FACFAS, and John Steinberg, DPM, FACFAS
    21,388 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/08
        Diabetic foot ulcers are among the many complications encountered with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes will experience an ulcer in their lifetimes.1,2 Additionally, 85 percent of all nontraumatic lower extremity amputations are preceded by a preventable ulceration.3,4    Diabetic foot ulcerations pose a considerable economic burden. In 1995, Medicare spent $1.5 billion on diabetic lower extremity ulcers.5 One retrospective analysis found that foot ulc ... continue reading
    An extensive CDC survey notes that arthritis creates an additional barrier to exercise for patients with diabetes. Cherri Choate, DPM, suggests low-impact water exercises for such patients.
    Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    5,288 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/08
    Getting patients with diabetes to exercise may be an uphill battle due to disease concerns. The combination of arthritis with diabetes can be an additional barrier to activity, according to a large survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC utilized 2005 and 2007 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which surveyed hundreds of thousands of people across the United States and its territories. The BRFSS survey indicated that the prevalence of arthritis in adults diagnosed with diabetes was 52 percent. Furthermore ... continue reading

    2,323 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/08
    I have just finished reading the article, “EBM: Can It Be A Reality In Practice?” (see page 38 in the May issue). I acknowledge and understand the viewpoints presented in the article. However, if we all waited for articles to be peer reviewed before trying a new treatment, how would this help patients currently? When a new technology or modality appears, and it is presented in a journal that is not peer reviewed, should we be skeptical of using the modality on our patients? Someone has to take the initiative to try the new product and report back to ... continue reading
    Here one can see MRSA of the heel after wound debridement.The patient received linezolid postoperatively.
    Eliza Addis-Thomas, DPM, Jon Key, DPM, FACFAS and Peter A. Blume, DPM, FACFAS
    61,857 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/08
    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen that can result in everything from minor skin infections to osteomyelitis, bacteremia, endocarditis and pneumonia.1 In podiatry, infections with Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are something physicians see on a daily basis. In a study determining the prevalence of MRSA in infected and uninfected diabetic foot ulcers, 61 percent of infected diabetic foot ulcers were infected with MRSA.2 With the emergence of multi-drug resistant St ... continue reading