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    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • December 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 12
    A study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests running shoes of different prices have comparable cushioning regardless of cost.
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    9,642 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/07
    When choosing a pair of running shoes, consumers have a wide range of choices with a number of models available in different price ranges. Does buying a more expensive running shoe necessarily translate into getting a better quality shoe? A recent study suggests there may not be that much difference in cushioning between inexpensive and more expensive shoes. The study, which was recently published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, compared a total of nine pairs of men’s running shoes from three different manufacturers. Researchers compared low-priced shoes (&poun ... continue reading