Volume 20 - Issue 12 - December 2007

Orthotics Q&A »

Current Insights On Custom And Prefabricated Foot Orthoses

Guest Clinical Editor: Scott Spencer, DPM | 6888 reads | 0 comments

Q: How do you evaluate a patient for foot orthotic devices?
A:
All three panelists will perform a gait analysis. Russell Volpe, DPM, begins by assessing what he wants the orthosis to accomplish once he decides a CFO is indicated. If control of motion is needed, he will tailor material selection and many of the plaster modifications and prescription items to help accomplish that goal. If Dr. Volpe’s desired goal is accommodation, soft-tissue supplementation or assistance with motion, he will gear material selection and prescription features toward those goals. He also c



Practice Builders »

Key Secrets To Successful Delegation

By Lynn Homisak, PRT | 4538 reads | 0 comments

Many people are faced with the stress of “so much to do and so little time.” They blame poor time management as the culprit when, in fact, the underlying issue in many cases is their inability to properly delegate tasks. They have a need to do it all themselves when there are others who can and are willing to lend a hand.

Are you one of those people? Face it: there is only so much you can do to add value to your practice without enlisting the help of others. If you find you are among the many who would “rather do it yourself,” you will also find that sooner or later



Technology In Practice »

Can A Comprehensive AFO Offer Superior Compliance?

By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor | 3597 reads | 0 comments

Emerging as a custom gauntlet-type ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) with wide-reaching indications, the ProLab Orthotics Custom Gauntlet AFO reportedly offers non-surgical stabilization of the rearfoot and ankle in all three planes. Jonathan Kreger, DPM, attests he uses the Gauntlet AFO for conditions beyond the manufacturer’s recommended indications with very positive results.

“Compliance with the Stabilizer AFO is excellent and much better than with standard polypropylene ankle and foot orthoses or other braces,” maintains Dr. Kreger.

Read the full story »

Forum »

Why We Are Training The Next Generation The Right Way

By John H. McCord, DPM | 2954 reads | 0 comments

My partner and I recently had the pleasure of having a fourth-year podiatry student assist with surgery for a displaced ankle fracture. This was a young man who accompanied his grandmother to our office about four years ago. He let us know that he was finished with his bachelor’s degree in biology and was applying to several medical schools. He seemed interested in our work so I invited him to spend a day with us in the clinic.

Four years ago, he spent several days observing us in our daily office work and a few days in surgery. Now he is on the verge of completing podiatry



Feature »

Current Concepts In Ankle Arthroscopy

By Catherine Cheung, DPM | 25322 reads | 0 comments

   Ankle arthroscopy is an extremely useful skill for a foot and ankle surgeon. Foot and ankle surgeons use ankle arthroscopies to treat a variety of problems, including osteochondral defects, loose osteochondral fragments, ankle impingement, post-traumatic fibrous bands, synovitis and ligamentous/capsular injuries.

   Ankle arthroscopy has several advantages over an open ankle procedure. The surgery is minimally invasive and has a low complication rate. One can perform this on an outpatient basis and it facilitates a relatively easy postoperative recovery per



Feature »

Understanding The Benefits Of Electrical Bone Stimulation

By Glenn Weinraub, DPM, FACFAS | 12631 reads | 0 comments

Approximately 6 million extremity fractures occur in the United States each year. Five to 10 percent of these fractures will go on to delayed or nonunion. In regard to lost wages and additional treatment for delayed and nonunions, this translates into an annual economic loss to the United States of $3 to $6 billion.

One of the vexing and controversial issues related to the use of electric bone stimulation regards the actual definition of when a delayed or a nonunion occurs. The historic definition of a nonunion by the FDA was that of osseous discontinuity of nine months’



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