Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • November 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 11
    Here one can see a lawnmower injury suffered by a pediatric patient. Molly Judge, DPM, generally tries to use simple mechanical forms of wound coverage in the acute setting.
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    39,752 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Important questions arise when traumatic wounds occur in the lower extremity. Accordingly, our expert panelists address key considerations in the initial evaluation and when one should consider an amputation. They also explore the use of soft tissue coverage, skin substitutes and topical dressings with traumatic wounds. Q: What protocol/triage steps do you utilize in the initial evaluation of a traumatic wound? A: For a patient with extreme pain and a traumatic wound that requires immediate surgical debridement, Molly Judge, DPM, says pain management and a ... continue reading
    By Marc Katz, DPM
    26,458 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Cryosurgery is an effective pain relief modality that uses freezing temperatures for ablation of the nerves that provide sensation to the heel. While this treatment is relatively new for foot pain, physicians have utilized cryosurgery for pain relief for decades. This modality has proven to be a viable treatment and is an excellent choice for appropriate patients prior to considering more invasive procedures. Heel pain has become an epidemic in our society. Diabetes, arthritis, weight gain, injuries, previous heel surgery and other medical conditions are known contributing factors. ... continue reading
    The PathFormer cable is connected to a pair of monitoring electrodes on the patient’s skin. The operator presses and holds down the actuating button until the cutter automatically pulls away from the nail after creating a microconduit.
    By Andreas Boker, MD; Clinical Editor: Jesse Burks, DPM
    18,880 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    The fully keratinized, thick multilayered structure of the nail plate presents a formidable barrier to nail bed access. This limits the options for treatment of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and subungual hematoma from nail trauma. Until recently, clinicians considered nail removal as an option for formal repair of the nail bed for subungual hematomas involving large regions of the nail bed.1 Penetration enhancing formulations have aided the delivery of molecules to the nail bed through the impermeable nail plate.2 Researchers have used a carbon diox ... continue reading