Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 11
    The grid pattern on the foot indicates the point of greatest tenderness in relation to plantar fascia pain. Use of a 0.062 K-wire or 18-gauge needle to penetrate through the skin and fat to the level of fascia.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM, and Bora Rhim, DPM
    18,841 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    In the United States, at least 10 percent of the population experiences heel pain secondary to plantar fasciitis. Reportedly, 600,000 outpatient visits to medical professionals a year are due to plantar fasciitis.1 According to a 2003 study, plantar fasciitis frequently occurs in people who are on their feet most of the day, those who are obese and those who have limited ankle dorsiflexion.2 However, it is important to recognize that all heel pain symptoms do not stem from plantar fasciitis. There are many different etiologies for heel pain and making the ... continue reading
    (Photo courtesy of Kirk Herring, DPM) Clinicians may pursue cast immobilization in conjunction with giving a final corticosteroid injection.
    By Eric M. Feit, DPM and Alona Kashanian, DPM
    16,291 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Over the years, podiatrists have become the primary health care providers for all forefoot conditions and most rearfoot conditions. With greater public awareness and increased referrals from primary care doctors, heel pain pathology is perhaps the most common foot pathology we treat in our offices. As a result, many new devices and surgical techniques have emerged in recent years to help improve our outcomes. Unfortunately, some of these newer methods and techniques are not always necessary and may not demonstrate the same outcomes that some of the research states. It ... continue reading
    Ocean Aid says podiatrists can use Ocean Aid Spray for topical cleansing of burns, lacerations and abrasions. The spray is also indicated for debridement of postoperative wounds, stage I-IV pressure ulcers and diabetic ulcers, according to the company.
    By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor
    3,055 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Ocean Aid Spray, which recently garnered the American Podiatric Medical Association Seal of Approval, offers a wound care solution that combines an enzymatic debridement therapy with all-natural elements to help protect and nourish cells. The spray uses a combination of reverse osmosis filtered water, coral reef salt and lysozyme to reduce wound healing time by almost 50 percent, according to Ocean Aid, the manufacturer of the product. Ocean Aid cites the inclusion of lysozyme as essential to the product’s ability to facilitate wound healing. Lysozyme is a nat ... continue reading