Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 11
    The PathFormer cable is connected to a pair of monitoring electrodes on the patient’s skin. The operator presses and holds down the actuating button until the cutter automatically pulls away from the nail after creating a microconduit.
    By Andreas Boker, MD; Clinical Editor: Jesse Burks, DPM
    20,012 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    The fully keratinized, thick multilayered structure of the nail plate presents a formidable barrier to nail bed access. This limits the options for treatment of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and subungual hematoma from nail trauma. Until recently, clinicians considered nail removal as an option for formal repair of the nail bed for subungual hematomas involving large regions of the nail bed.1 Penetration enhancing formulations have aided the delivery of molecules to the nail bed through the impermeable nail plate.2 Researchers have used a carbon diox ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA, CWS
    113,849 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    As with any peripheral nerve surgery, tarsal tunnel surgery is demanding and can sometimes be excessively difficult. Additionally, one may not have a full appreciation of the outcome until some point in the postoperative period — if at all — when the nerve has had adequate time for recovery and/or regeneration. Sadly, there are many misnomers in podiatric medicine and surgery. For example, the nomenclature of “tarsal tunnel syndrome” implies that the site of chronic nerve entrapment is at the level of the tarsal tunnel, ... continue reading
    The grid pattern on the foot indicates the point of greatest tenderness in relation to plantar fascia pain. Use of a 0.062 K-wire or 18-gauge needle to penetrate through the skin and fat to the level of fascia.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM, and Bora Rhim, DPM
    18,553 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    In the United States, at least 10 percent of the population experiences heel pain secondary to plantar fasciitis. Reportedly, 600,000 outpatient visits to medical professionals a year are due to plantar fasciitis.1 According to a 2003 study, plantar fasciitis frequently occurs in people who are on their feet most of the day, those who are obese and those who have limited ankle dorsiflexion.2 However, it is important to recognize that all heel pain symptoms do not stem from plantar fasciitis. There are many different etiologies for heel pain and making the ... continue reading