Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
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  • November 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 11
    Podiatrists have a huge selection of prefabricated foot orthoses (PFOs) if they choose to use them. Although there is a great deal of research validating effectiveness, no consensus exists for length, materials, design or rearfoot posting.
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    16,330 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    The world of orthotic therapy and foot biomechanics was somewhat shaken in 2006 when a randomized study found that “customized and prefabricated orthoses used in the trial (had) similar effectiveness in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.”1 Of course, there was a great deal more to this study than the one sentence but it sure stimulated discussion within podiatry and orthopedic surgery concerning the value of custom orthoses in comparison to prefabricated devices. There are actually four relatively recent trials that compare prefabricated and custom orthoses relativ ... continue reading

    1,740 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Healing wounds with silver is a tried and true practice, and a new product makes silver use simpler. Allevyn™ Ag Silver Wound Dressings are composed of hydrocellular foam and are part of a line of products that manage fluids and have moisture balance, according to the manufacturer Smith and Nephew. The company notes the dressings have a seven-day wear time. During this time, the dressings release silver in a sustained fashion and provide bactericidal protection against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, according to the company. ... continue reading
    With a calcaneal stress fracture, pain is usually not as significant with plantar palpation but there may be increased pain intensity with a direct side-to-side compression of the heel as shown above.
    By Charles F. Peebles, DPM
    6,314 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,144 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    I am going through an interesting phase of my career as a podiatrist. I am trying to find a replacement for myself when I walk out the back door December 31, 2008. I plan to throw the keys to the office behind me and lock myself out. My license expires that day. This day also marks my 62nd birthday. I do not plan to dabble in podiatry until I get old(er) and feeble. Replacing me is an interesting challenge. I advertised the job of an associate for my partner, who will be taking over the practice. Seven well qualified young podiatrists applied. They have all had or are completing thr ... continue reading
    In a new study, 10 to 18 percent of patients with diabetes said they would sacrifice eight to 10 years of life in perfect health to avoid a life of diabetic treatments.
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    6,175 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Given that patients with diabetes can face extensive treatments due to the risk of complications, adherence to treatment regimens may be a problem due to a perceived decline in their quality of life. A new study finds that although end-stage complications have the greatest effect on quality of life, comprehensive treatments affect quality of life to the degree that some patients were willing to forego years of healthy living to avoid treatments. In the study, which was recently published in Diabetes Care, researchers interviewed 701 patients with diabetes a ... continue reading
    This cadaveric dissection depicts the location of the sural nerve in relation to an endoscopic gastrocnemius recession. The top of the picture shows the proximal leg with a medial view on the left side and a lateral view on the right.
    By Paul J. Kim, DPM, Clinical Editor: John S. Steinberg, DPM
    25,071 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    While various researchers have implicated the equinus deformity as a major deforming force in a host of foot and ankle pathologies, the exact definition of equinus remains unclear.1-4 However, Root states that “the minimal range of ankle joint dorsiflexion that is necessary for normal locomotion is 10 degrees.”5 Subsequent studies report that the ankle joint range of motion for asymptomatic patients ranges from 0 to 13.1 degrees with the knee extended and from 5 to 22.3 degrees with the knee flexed.6-9 The implication from these studies and ... continue reading
    Here one can see a lawnmower injury suffered by a pediatric patient. Molly Judge, DPM, generally tries to use simple mechanical forms of wound coverage in the acute setting.
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    40,090 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Important questions arise when traumatic wounds occur in the lower extremity. Accordingly, our expert panelists address key considerations in the initial evaluation and when one should consider an amputation. They also explore the use of soft tissue coverage, skin substitutes and topical dressings with traumatic wounds. Q: What protocol/triage steps do you utilize in the initial evaluation of a traumatic wound? A: For a patient with extreme pain and a traumatic wound that requires immediate surgical debridement, Molly Judge, DPM, says pain management and a ... continue reading
    By Marc Katz, DPM
    26,902 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    Cryosurgery is an effective pain relief modality that uses freezing temperatures for ablation of the nerves that provide sensation to the heel. While this treatment is relatively new for foot pain, physicians have utilized cryosurgery for pain relief for decades. This modality has proven to be a viable treatment and is an excellent choice for appropriate patients prior to considering more invasive procedures. Heel pain has become an epidemic in our society. Diabetes, arthritis, weight gain, injuries, previous heel surgery and other medical conditions are known contributing factors. ... continue reading
    The PathFormer cable is connected to a pair of monitoring electrodes on the patient’s skin. The operator presses and holds down the actuating button until the cutter automatically pulls away from the nail after creating a microconduit.
    By Andreas Boker, MD; Clinical Editor: Jesse Burks, DPM
    19,193 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    The fully keratinized, thick multilayered structure of the nail plate presents a formidable barrier to nail bed access. This limits the options for treatment of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and subungual hematoma from nail trauma. Until recently, clinicians considered nail removal as an option for formal repair of the nail bed for subungual hematomas involving large regions of the nail bed.1 Penetration enhancing formulations have aided the delivery of molecules to the nail bed through the impermeable nail plate.2 Researchers have used a carbon diox ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA, CWS
    107,155 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/07
    As with any peripheral nerve surgery, tarsal tunnel surgery is demanding and can sometimes be excessively difficult. Additionally, one may not have a full appreciation of the outcome until some point in the postoperative period — if at all — when the nerve has had adequate time for recovery and/or regeneration. Sadly, there are many misnomers in podiatric medicine and surgery. For example, the nomenclature of “tarsal tunnel syndrome” implies that the site of chronic nerve entrapment is at the level of the tarsal tunnel, ... continue reading