Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 4
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    16,485 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    Practitioners traditionally use cortisone or alcohol sclerosing injections, orthotics, surgery or other modalities to treat foot neuromas. Now you can also use precisely targeted ice injections as a minimally invasive surgical procedure for relieving painful neuromas in the foot. New research on this modality was recently reported at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). Freezing these neuromas is proving very effective as an alternative to surgery for treating neuromas that fail conservative methods, according to study authors Lawrence Fallat, DPM, FA ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    3,571 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    Is your practice HIPAA compliant? Indeed, the looming deadlines for compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) will require careful consideration of the patient privacy protections you have in place at your practice. Will this process be time-consuming, expensive and stretch your staff even further than they’re stretched already? Absolutely. By April 14, 2003, your practice must be compliant with HIPAA’s Privacy Rule. If someone knowingly violates HIPAA and obtains individually identifiable health information or discloses it to another, he or she may b ... continue reading
    By Chih Yen
    7,165 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    Over 16 million people in the United States have diabetes and this number is growing by the hour. Diabetes is now the fifth leading cause of death in this country.1 By understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes and the environmental factors which contribute to this disease, we can have a better focus on the scope and nature of the threat to our patient population with diabetes. With this in mind, it’s important to have a thorough knowledge of the potential impact of insulin resistance syndrome, a condition in which the tissues of the body become desensitized to insulin. It is a chronic s ... continue reading
    By Leon R. Brill, DPM, FACFAS, CWS
    6,641 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    The winds of change have blown through the medical community with a vengeance in the last 25 years. Managed care has turned medicine upside down. Dramatically lower fees and higher overhead expenses have made us work doubly hard just to maintain some level of consistency in our practice. Just as we have seen in the hospital community, economic necessity has made some strange bedfellows. ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,531 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    The lifeblood of a quality podiatry practice is a steady and diverse physician referral base. No podiatrist would argue that point. However, there is a flipside to the axiom that all referrals are a good thing. I’m thinking about the “referral traps” I have experienced over the past 27 years as a small town podiatrist. ... continue reading
    When it comes to treating hammertoes, primary surgical treatments commonly involve arthroplasty or arthrodesis, although soft tissue repairs have also been advocated.
    By Michael D. Dujela, DPM, James L. Chianese, DPM, James R. Holfinger, DPM, and Richard J. Zirm, DPM
    28,530 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    Digital contractures are among the most common deformities we see in podiatric practice. McGlamry described three etiologies for hammertoes: flexor stabilization, flexor substitution and extensor substitution.1 While each entity may exist independently, it is more likely you will see co-existing etiologies, particularly when you’re dealing with more complex deformities. Most hammertoes in early stages primarily involve sagittal contractures. However, as the deformity progresses, transverse plane components may be unmasked. You may recognize transverse plane deformities early on as a subtle... continue reading
    By Anthony Poggio, DPM
    2,995 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    Which managed care contracts should you sign? Which are truly beneficial for our individual practices? Many of us sign up for every managed care contract out of a sense of fear. There is this notion that if you don’t sign up, someone else will and you will lose access to a group of patients. Then when we submit claims or request authorizations, we find out that working with certain plans is cumbersome and frustrating. By that time, it is too late. There have been many articles written about reviewing contracts from a legal perspective, but what about the practical aspects? There are sever ... continue reading
    A 76-year-old insulin-dependent male with diabetes presented with an ulceration under his big toe (see above photo). He has a long-term history of peripheral vascular disease and previously had an amputation of the fifth toe on the same foot.
    By Alan J. Cantor, DPM
    9,031 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    The last decade has seen a tremendous evolution in the field of advanced wound management, both as a discipline and in regard to the development of wound healing therapies. New dressings, human skin equivalents, and barometric intervention all compete for utilization in the wound healing process. While each of these options is a viable intervention, there still needs to be more recognition of how wound biology and histo-cellular function affect wound healing. Indeed, understanding the process of healing wounds is essential for the clinician dedicated to wound medicine. Often, it is stated th... continue reading

    22,312 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    Muscle strength testing is not always part of a standard podiatric biomechanical evaluation. Unfortunately, muscular weakness can often influence function and, if undetected, can lead to chronic pain in the joints which the weakened muscles support. There are several reasons for muscular weakness, but the most common cause is chronic inhibition signaling from the CNS. Since motor signals to muscles normally cycle between facilitation (excitation) and inhibition, an alteration in this signaling can often cause chronic inhibition and subsequent pain. With this in mind, our expert panelists offe ... continue reading
    When there is a talipes calcaneal valgus deformity (as seen above), it will typically result in a delayed onset in ambulation.
    By Ronald L. Valmassy, DPM
    26,168 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/02
    In order to treat lower extremity pediatric problems, it is essential to have a sound knowledge of the normal and abnormal development of the child’s lower extremities. As structural and positional developmental changes take place in a dynamic and continuous fashion, you must have a strong grasp of when and how the changes occur during normal maturation. Once you become comfortable with this knowledge, you can successfully diagnose and treat pediatric lower extremity gait abnormalities. As many have stated, the early years of development represent the golden years of treatment when you ma... continue reading