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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • March 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 3
    By John E. Hahn, DPM, ND
    12,153 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in the United States, with 15.7 million Americans afflicted with the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, and the primary cause of blindness in people (due to diabetic retinopathy) between the ages of 20 and 70.1 ... continue reading
    By Eric M. Feit, DPM, FACFAS and Alona Kashanian, DPM
    11,252 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    It is typically easier to heal a diabetic foot ulcer than it is to prevent recurrence. Once you’ve healed the ulcer, the next challenge is to minimize pressure at the site of the old ulceration or the site of a boney prominence. If the patient has never had an ulcer but has a high risk for ulceration, then employing pressure off devices is essential for prevention. Obviously, the large majority of diabetic foot ulcerations are preventable. There are several keys to prevention, which include organized treatment protocols, early detection, aggressive wound care, orthotics and appropriate sho... continue reading
    By Ken Rehm, DPM
    7,343 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    Diabetes is considered one of the most psychologically and behaviorally demanding of the chronic medical illnesses. Patients with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to depression. Indeed, up to one in every three diabetics has depression at a level that impairs functioning and quality of life, and lowers adherence to glucose monitoring, exercise, diet, medication regimes and glycemic control. As a result, depression increases the risk of long-term diabetic complications. When you use self-reporting surveys as a gauge, you’ll find an even broader spectrum of depressive illness in diabetic... continue reading