Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • | Volume 20 - Issue
    By Gerard Guerin, DPM, CWS
    8,960 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists commonly encounter and treat skin and skin-structure infections (SSSIs), ranging from cellulitis to more complicated surgical site infections and infected diabetic foot ulcers. Aerobic gram-positive cocci, such as Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci, are the most common causative agents of skin infections.1 While the treatment of simple and superficial infections is relatively straightforward with brief courses of oral antibiotics, many skin infections of the foot are complicated by diabetes.1,2 Foot ulceration, usually secondary to peripheral n... continue reading
    By Alexander Reyzelman, DPM, Joseph Fiorito, Cody Hoover and Michael Brewer
    12,439 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In the podiatric profession, we are frequently faced with chronic painful musculoskeletal processes that get labeled as arthritis, chronic plantar fasciitis, neuroma, etc. Perhaps it would behoove us to start thinking of an underlying neurological pathology that may be responsible for foot or ankle pain. In the senior author’s opinion, there is more neurological pathology causing foot and ankle pain than is being diagnosed. This may explain the cases in which patients have chronic musculoskeletal conditions and undergo surgery, but their pain never improves. Accordingly,... continue reading
    By G. “Dock” Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    9,655 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A 37-year-old Caucasian male presents with a chief complaint of a nodular growth on the left calf. He first noticed the bump about two months ago but says he did not think too much about it until recently. At that time, he noticed it was causing mild discomfort when he touched it but the growth was only slightly pruritic. The lesion did not appear to be infected and it did not drain or bleed at any time. He says he checked the rest of his body for any similar looking lesions and found none. Otherwise, he has no other complaints or concerns. The patient has not changed his diet or ... continue reading