Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • | Volume 20 - Issue
    By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CMP, and Hope Rachel Hetico, RN, MHA, CMP
    8,289 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When one speaks of maximizing medical practice reimbursement, most physicians immediately think of the National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) or coding-oriented consultants. However, bolstering reimbursement involves more than just using the newest Current Procedural Terminology® (CPT) codes, parsing old codes or even becoming a CPT coding expert. It is the entire economic compliance ecosystem that surrounds the office cash flow and revenue recognition cycle. This cycle is defined as the process that serves patients, accounts for receivables and collects those receivables from ... continue reading
    Here one can see a fracture in a patient with diabetic neuropathy after she fell. A new study says patients with diabetes face an increased risk of complications following trauma surgery.
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    4,674 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Patients with diabetes face a higher risk of complications in a number of areas. A large study recently published in the Archives of Surgery notes that those with diabetes also face more complications from trauma surgery. From 1984 to 2002, researchers examined 12,489 patients with diabetes, matching their ages, sex and injury severity with 12,489 non-diabetic patients from 27 Pennsylvania trauma centers. The study concluded that patients with diabetes spent more time in the intensive care unit and received ventilator support for a longer period of time. Twenty-three perc... continue reading
    By Gerard Guerin, DPM, CWS
    9,678 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists commonly encounter and treat skin and skin-structure infections (SSSIs), ranging from cellulitis to more complicated surgical site infections and infected diabetic foot ulcers. Aerobic gram-positive cocci, such as Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci, are the most common causative agents of skin infections.1 While the treatment of simple and superficial infections is relatively straightforward with brief courses of oral antibiotics, many skin infections of the foot are complicated by diabetes.1,2 Foot ulceration, usually secondary to peripheral n... continue reading