Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • | Volume 20 - Issue
    (Photo courtesy of Ronald Valmassy, DPM)
Mary Keen, MD, emphasizes the importance of gait training with a pediatric physical therapist.
    Guest Clinical Editor: Edwin Harris, DPM
    9,228 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Given that toe walking and other gait disturbances are common among children, these expert panelists take a closer look at these conditions, offer keys to the diagnostic assessment and share their insights on appropriate treatment modalities and physical therapy regimens.Q: What is your treatment plan for children with diplegia and hemiplegia?A: Mary Keen, MD, says most children with diplegia and hemiplegia walk so she strives to facilitate independent ambulation. In order to achieve safe, efficient ambulation, Dr. Keen says children need ad... continue reading
    By Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Debra Mardis, DPM
    16,312 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Approximately 50 percent of all sports injuries are secondary to overuse.1 Overuse injuries result from repetitive microtrauma that leads to local tissue damage in the form of cellular and extracellular degeneration. Injury is most likely to occur when an athlete changes the intensity or length of training. This has been described as the “principle of transition.”1 A discrepancy between work and recovery can lead to breakdown on a cellular, extracellular or systemic level. Other factors that can influence wear and tear include biomechanical abnormalities, poor train... continue reading
    Running shoes are lightest in weight and offer maximum cushioning. They are designed for linear activity and should never be worn for court activity.
    By Josh White, DPM, CPed
    19,390 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    For professional athletes and weekend warriors alike, having the right shoe and the correct fit can mean the difference between participating and sitting on the sidelines. Since most podiatrists now fit shoes in their offices, it is imperative that they develop a true expertise in this critical aspect of foot care, particularly with respect to the special needs of athletes. Providing proper shoe fit and selection for active individuals holds great potential for both injury prevention and for practice expansion. When podiatrists themselves fit patients with athletic shoes, it fills... continue reading