Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • | Volume 20 - Issue
    By Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Debra Mardis, DPM
    16,437 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Approximately 50 percent of all sports injuries are secondary to overuse.1 Overuse injuries result from repetitive microtrauma that leads to local tissue damage in the form of cellular and extracellular degeneration. Injury is most likely to occur when an athlete changes the intensity or length of training. This has been described as the “principle of transition.”1 A discrepancy between work and recovery can lead to breakdown on a cellular, extracellular or systemic level. Other factors that can influence wear and tear include biomechanical abnormalities, poor train... continue reading
    Running shoes are lightest in weight and offer maximum cushioning. They are designed for linear activity and should never be worn for court activity.
    By Josh White, DPM, CPed
    19,673 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    For professional athletes and weekend warriors alike, having the right shoe and the correct fit can mean the difference between participating and sitting on the sidelines. Since most podiatrists now fit shoes in their offices, it is imperative that they develop a true expertise in this critical aspect of foot care, particularly with respect to the special needs of athletes. Providing proper shoe fit and selection for active individuals holds great potential for both injury prevention and for practice expansion. When podiatrists themselves fit patients with athletic shoes, it fills... continue reading
    Post-op pressure on the amputation site of the lower extremity resulted in this chronic non-healing wound for six months.
    By Patris A. Toney, DPM, MPH, and Vickie R. Driver, DPM, MS
    4,636 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The future of growth factor therapy in wound care is advancing rapidly. There is also increasing evidence in the literature to support the efficacy of growth factors in wounds, particularly chronic wounds, and how they can help facilitate desired healing outcomes. With advances in research over the past decades, physicians and researchers have teamed together to isolate and identify the disruption(s) in the sequence of wound healing that lead to chronic wounds. Upon a closer examination of the phases of wound healing on the cellular level, it is clear that cytokines, particularly g... continue reading

    2,750 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Two new wound healing products harness the power of the ocean. The all-natural Ocean Aid Spray and Ocean Aid Moisturizing Foam can heal wounds without antiseptics or disinfectants, according to the manufacturer Ocean Aid, Inc. The company says the product line uses lysozyme, a natural antibacterial enzyme, along with coral reef sea salt in a sterile solution. The company says Ocean Aid Spray uses an isotonic, purified sea salt solution while Ocean Aid Moisturizing Foam offers an antiinflammatory formula for soothing pain after phenol procedures as well as other nail procedures. Bo... continue reading
    Here is an example of a patient requiring primary closure over a weightbearing area and a skin graft over a non-weightbearing area.
    By Tod Storm, DPM
    10,346 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Continuing Education Course #157 October 2007 I am pleased to introduce the latest article, “A Guide To Current Concepts In Skin Grafting,” in our CE series. This series, brought to you by the North American Center for Continuing Medical Education (NACCME), consists... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,295 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    My favorite writing project is to produce a “return to work” document for a patient who has recovered from a serious foot or ankle problem. I had that pleasure last week on behalf of a 53-year-old gentleman whom I first met six months ago during a hospital consult. His primary physician requested a consult regarding a diabetic ulcer with cellulitus involving the fourth and fifth toes of the left foot. The primary doc also let me know that he was beginning his vacation that day so I could manage the patient until he was ready for discharge. It all seemed like a convenien... continue reading
    By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CMP, and Hope Rachel Hetico, RN, MHA, CMP
    7,303 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When one speaks of maximizing medical practice reimbursement, most physicians immediately think of the National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) or coding-oriented consultants. However, bolstering reimbursement involves more than just using the newest Current Procedural Terminology® (CPT) codes, parsing old codes or even becoming a CPT coding expert. It is the entire economic compliance ecosystem that surrounds the office cash flow and revenue recognition cycle. This cycle is defined as the process that serves patients, accounts for receivables and collects those receivables from ... continue reading
    Here one can see a fracture in a patient with diabetic neuropathy after she fell. A new study says patients with diabetes face an increased risk of complications following trauma surgery.
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    4,076 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Patients with diabetes face a higher risk of complications in a number of areas. A large study recently published in the Archives of Surgery notes that those with diabetes also face more complications from trauma surgery. From 1984 to 2002, researchers examined 12,489 patients with diabetes, matching their ages, sex and injury severity with 12,489 non-diabetic patients from 27 Pennsylvania trauma centers. The study concluded that patients with diabetes spent more time in the intensive care unit and received ventilator support for a longer period of time. Twenty-three perc... continue reading
    By Gerard Guerin, DPM, CWS
    8,958 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists commonly encounter and treat skin and skin-structure infections (SSSIs), ranging from cellulitis to more complicated surgical site infections and infected diabetic foot ulcers. Aerobic gram-positive cocci, such as Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci, are the most common causative agents of skin infections.1 While the treatment of simple and superficial infections is relatively straightforward with brief courses of oral antibiotics, many skin infections of the foot are complicated by diabetes.1,2 Foot ulceration, usually secondary to peripheral n... continue reading
    By Alexander Reyzelman, DPM, Joseph Fiorito, Cody Hoover and Michael Brewer
    12,436 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In the podiatric profession, we are frequently faced with chronic painful musculoskeletal processes that get labeled as arthritis, chronic plantar fasciitis, neuroma, etc. Perhaps it would behoove us to start thinking of an underlying neurological pathology that may be responsible for foot or ankle pain. In the senior author’s opinion, there is more neurological pathology causing foot and ankle pain than is being diagnosed. This may explain the cases in which patients have chronic musculoskeletal conditions and undergo surgery, but their pain never improves. Accordingly,... continue reading