Volume 20 - Issue 9 - September 2007

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Offering A Few Opinions On Post-Op Second Opinions

By John H. McCord, DPM | 2414 reads | 0 comments

Second opinions were easy when I started my practice 32 years ago. There was an ancient orthopedic surgeon (who also did gallbladders and hysterectomies). He always tried to steal my patients who came to him for a second opinion. The tremors in his hands tended to scare the patients back to me.

There were two young orthopedic surgeons who would say, “We can do a good job for you but McCord is as good as we are, but not better.” This mixed message always left them confused and they generally returned to me. There were no other podiatrists within 30 miles.



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Steroid Injections: Are They Overutilized In Athletes?

Moderator: Douglas Richie Jr., DPM Panelists: James Losito, DPM, Mike Lowe, DPM,Stephen Pribut, DPM, and Amol Saxena, DPM | 12468 reads | 1 comments

When treating athletes, podiatrists may use corticosteroid injections to treat various conditions. However, are such injections overutilized in athletes? Here is what our expert panelists have to say about what factors to consider in using injectable steroids, differences in treating athletes and non-athletes, and the type of steroids to use.

Q: When treating an athlete, which condition are you most likely to treat with corticosteroid injection?
A: Mike Lowe, DPM, and Amol Saxena, DPM, both use corticosteroid injections for neuromas. As Dr. Lowe notes,



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How To Address Sesamoids in Hallux Valgus Surgery

By Trenton K. Statler, DPM | 20269 reads | 0 comments

The surgical correction of hallux valgus (aka bunion) is one of the most common operations a foot and ankle surgeon will face. With over 130 procedures described to date, no one procedure has proven to be the definitive solution for every bunion situation. However, the common denominators for success remain osseous realignment and soft tissue balancing. The location of the sesamoid complex in relationship to the first metatarsal plays an integral part in determining whether one has achieved this realignment and balancing act.

The exact etiology of hallux valgus still remains rather controve



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A Guide To Detecting And Treating Limb Length Discrepancy

By Richard L. Blake, DPM | 14993 reads | 1 comments

Limb length discrepancy (LLD) can cause a variety of symptoms. There are a variety of common clinical techniques clinicians can use to help detect LLD. Radiographic imaging provides the best method for measuring LLD. Treatments vary but can lead to significant improvement of symptoms. Indeed, the detection and treatment of LLD can be a very satisfying aspect of a clinical biomechanics practice.

In cases of LLD, gait evaluation normally shows the dominance of one side or leg. As the patient walks down the hall, there is a tendency to lean to one side. One can see this on every step o



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A Closer Look At Neoteric Biomechanics

By Dennis Shavelson, DPM | 9879 reads | 0 comments

For years, it seems like the $5,000 bunion and pressures from HMOs diverted DPMs’ attention from biomechanics. The emphasis of our education and practices strayed from Root toward Ilizarov and coding. “Gold standard” orthotics cast from foam or “posted to cast” do not generate the pride and acceptance that a Root device once did for podiatry and our orthotic fees are less justified when compared to high-tech, over-the-counter footbeds and custom devices casted by other providers or over the Internet.

The solution is neoteric biomechanics, a school of func



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How To Develop A Thriving Sports Medicine Practice

By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor | 7222 reads | 0 comments

When it comes to being recognized as a true sports medicine physician, Lisa Schoene, DPM, ATC, says in order to “talk the talk, you better walk the walk.” Dr. Schoene says the best sports medicine practitioners are the ones who cover the events and are out there covering races even when it is cold and rainy or starting very early in the morning.

“Hands-on experience is imperative in my mind,” emphasizes Dr. Schoene, who has covered many marathons, triathlons and other races. “I question the physician who says he or she is a ‘sports medicine spe



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