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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • August 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 8
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    45,865 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Given the multifaceted nature of hallux limitus, having a strong understanding of the subject is vital for anyone who treats the feet. Indeed, hallux limitus is part of the discussion for a variety of conditions including hallux rigidus, hallux valgus, first MPJ arthritis, osteochondritis and first ray hypermobility. There are countless treatment solutions for hallux limitus depending on the nature of the pathology. Can one make any sense of the variety of topics related to hallux limitus? Is there a common ancestor to this pathology? If we know more about hallux limitus, is there a ... continue reading
    By G. “Dock” Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    289,982 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    It is late in the summer when a 29-year-old Caucasian female, employed as a medical assistant in your foot and ankle clinic, presents with a two-day history of red spots on her feet. The red spots became small fluid-filled vesicles, which are present mostly on the soles. She says she has broken one of the small vesicles and it expressed a clear fluid. The lesions are causing mild discomfort but are not very pruritic. Otherwise, she feels a little fatigued and reports a slightly elevated oral temperature today. Additionally, she reports a mild headache and a slight sore throat. She ... continue reading
    By Kristin K. Titko, DPM
    3,854 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    If there is one thing that I have learned in the past eight years that I did not know in my first six years of practice, it is this: work does not have to be full tilt stress. In the past two years, I have nearly perfected this motto. While I am certain there is still room for improvement, I would like to share some of the changes that allow me to maintain my level of desired profit while minimizing the stress along the way. Let me first warn you that some of what I want to share may be controversial. Some ideas stray far from the commonly accepted ideas of many specialists. They ma ... continue reading
    By Matt Sabo, DPM
    386,826 reads | 1 comments | 08/03/07
    By George Gumann, DPM
    11,096 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    As the practice of medicine continues to evolve, new advances are being initiated in the management of lower extremity trauma. These techniques involve a philosophical change regarding surgical approaches as well as technical innovations. The first change constitutes a philosophical departure in technique from the classical AO principles for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). While traditional AO techniques emphasized obtaining absolute anatomic reduction and rigid internal fixation of fractures, this goal was sometimes complicated by a large incisional approach with signi ... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Edwin Harris, DPM
    16,461 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Pediatric equinus can be a challenging condition to diagnose and treat. With this in mind, these expert panelists discuss the differential diagnosis, the positioning of orthoses to control the condition, and the benefits that various modalities can have in managing the condition. Q: How do you narrow down the differential diagnosis of pediatric equinus? A: Edwin Harris, DPM, cites several possible causes for equinus deformity including: hemiplegic and diplegic cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophies, peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord pathology, acquired contractu ... continue reading