Volume 20 - Issue 8 - August 2007

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When Planning Ahead Pays Off

By John McCord, DPM | 1507 reads | 0 comments

All of life’s issues seem open for discussion in the doctor’s lounge. There is a pot of coffee going, a TV and a couple of computer terminals with eBay blocked. I have enjoyed visiting with my colleagues and sharing our struggles with medicine, raising kids, buying cars and investments. It is an axiom that it is never wise to invest in anything you learned about in the doctor’s lounge.

I was having coffee with an internist friend last week. We both started practice at about the same time. Initially he did not want to have much to do with a podiatrist. I found him t



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The Top Ten Innovations In Podiatry

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 31474 reads | 0 comments

Every year brings new advances in the podiatric profession as technologies and modalities emerge to help DPMs overcome existing clinical hurdles. This year’s crop of innovations include the possible use of marrow-derived stem cells to facilitate wound healing, a new topical agent to help treat eczematous dermatoses and fixation devices that podiatric surgeons may find useful.

Without further delay, here is what the experts had to say on the top innovations in the podiatric profession.



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Mastering Ankle Impingement Syndromes

By Shine John, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM | 35311 reads | 0 comments

Impingement syndromes can result in chronic ankle pain. Initially described as “athlete’s ankle” and “footballer’s ankle,” these syndromes have been associated with athletic activities such as soccer, running, volleyball, high jumping and ballet dancing.1-3 These syndromes can affect either the anterior or posterior aspect of the ankle joint and its causal pathway can be of soft tissue and/or osseous origin.

Only one reported study describes impingement syndromes occurring concurrently at the anterior and posterior ankle.4 Pa



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Understanding The Biomechanical Effects Of Hallux Limitus

By Paul R. Scherer, DPM | 37719 reads | 0 comments

Given the multifaceted nature of hallux limitus, having a strong understanding of the subject is vital for anyone who treats the feet. Indeed, hallux limitus is part of the discussion for a variety of conditions including hallux rigidus, hallux valgus, first MPJ arthritis, osteochondritis and first ray hypermobility. There are countless treatment solutions for hallux limitus depending on the nature of the pathology.

Can one make any sense of the variety of topics related to hallux limitus? Is there a common ancestor to this pathology? If we know more about hallux limitus, is there a



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A Guide To Minimally Invasive Fracture Management

By George Gumann, DPM | 10011 reads | 0 comments

As the practice of medicine continues to evolve, new advances are being initiated in the management of lower extremity trauma. These techniques involve a philosophical change regarding surgical approaches as well as technical innovations.

The first change constitutes a philosophical departure in technique from the classical AO principles for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). While traditional AO techniques emphasized obtaining absolute anatomic reduction and rigid internal fixation of fractures, this goal was sometimes complicated by a large incisional approach with signi



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How To Handle Plantar Fibromas

By Matt Sabo, DPM | 318133 reads | 1 comments

Plantar fibroma is a common occurrence in the plantar aponeurosis that usually consists of a solitary lesion or multiple nodules. The condition commonly derives from the medial and central fascial band of the aponeurosis, and is typically non-cancerous. Plantar fibromas are generally slow growing lesions that are typically asymptomatic. Most nodules cause pain because of the irregular contour of the foot with ambulation and standing.



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