Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • August 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 8
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    44,398 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Given the multifaceted nature of hallux limitus, having a strong understanding of the subject is vital for anyone who treats the feet. Indeed, hallux limitus is part of the discussion for a variety of conditions including hallux rigidus, hallux valgus, first MPJ arthritis, osteochondritis and first ray hypermobility. There are countless treatment solutions for hallux limitus depending on the nature of the pathology. Can one make any sense of the variety of topics related to hallux limitus? Is there a common ancestor to this pathology? If we know more about hallux limitus, is there a ... continue reading
    By G. “Dock” Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    282,268 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    It is late in the summer when a 29-year-old Caucasian female, employed as a medical assistant in your foot and ankle clinic, presents with a two-day history of red spots on her feet. The red spots became small fluid-filled vesicles, which are present mostly on the soles. She says she has broken one of the small vesicles and it expressed a clear fluid. The lesions are causing mild discomfort but are not very pruritic. Otherwise, she feels a little fatigued and reports a slightly elevated oral temperature today. Additionally, she reports a mild headache and a slight sore throat. She ... continue reading
    By Matt Sabo, DPM
    375,116 reads | 1 comments | 08/03/07
    By Kristin K. Titko, DPM
    3,727 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    If there is one thing that I have learned in the past eight years that I did not know in my first six years of practice, it is this: work does not have to be full tilt stress. In the past two years, I have nearly perfected this motto. While I am certain there is still room for improvement, I would like to share some of the changes that allow me to maintain my level of desired profit while minimizing the stress along the way. Let me first warn you that some of what I want to share may be controversial. Some ideas stray far from the commonly accepted ideas of many specialists. They ma ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    28,761 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    By John F. Connors, DPM, and Ana J. Sanz, DPM
    17,205 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    To have a successful sports medicine practice, it is crucial to understand not only the foot and ankle but also the knee and hip, and the mechanism of injuries affecting these areas. Having the opportunity to treat and travel with the best runners in the world has forced me to have a stronger understanding of lower extremity biomechanics, the mechanics of running and the injuries associated with running. The knee is the most commonly injured part of the body in runners. Most of these injuries are chronic, overuse type of injuries. Knee injuries are often caused by a failure of the i ... continue reading
    By Jack Janov, Esq.
    18,568 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Most podiatrists may never be targeted by a malpractice claim. However, it is prudent to consider preemptive strategies to help reduce the risk of being sued and to minimize your potential exposure. Overall, recent jury verdict data show only slight increases to the median and average jury awards in many states and many medical malpractice cases resolve without the payment of any damages. However, the highest malpractice payouts have increased for the most severely injured patients, according to a Bureau of Justice review of the 2000 and 2004 statistics for Florida, Illinois, Maine, ... continue reading
    By Aaron Becker, Special Projects Editor
    2,815 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    With a wide range of indications, the AmeriGel Wound Dressing can be helpful in treating an array of lower extremity wounds. According to AmerX Health Care, the manufacturer of the wound dressing, the product reduces the healing time of matrixectomies by 20 to 50 percent. AmerX Health Care adds that the dressing has a demonstrated efficacy of 77 percent in wound care applications. The company says the AmeriGel Wound Dressing is the only FDA-approved, antimicrobial hydrogel. According to the company, the dressing is indicated for stage I-IV pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, diab ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    1,759 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    All of life’s issues seem open for discussion in the doctor’s lounge. There is a pot of coffee going, a TV and a couple of computer terminals with eBay blocked. I have enjoyed visiting with my colleagues and sharing our struggles with medicine, raising kids, buying cars and investments. It is an axiom that it is never wise to invest in anything you learned about in the doctor’s lounge. I was having coffee with an internist friend last week. We both started practice at about the same time. Initially he did not want to have much to do with a podiatrist. I found him t ... continue reading
    By Neal M. Blitz, DPM, FACFAS
    39,405 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Continuing Education Course #155 August 2007 I am pleased to introduce the latest article, “How To Address Failed Peroneal Tendon Surgery,” in our CE series. This series, brought to you by the North American Center for Continuing Medical Education (NACCME), consists of complimentary CE activities that qualify for one continuing education contact ho ... continue reading