Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • August 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 8
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    33,037 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    5,840 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    With the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rising, how can healthcare institutions protect patients? The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) recently conducted a survey of 1,237 hospitals and has formulated recommendations for preventing MRSA transmission. The study noted the rate of MRSA was 46 in 1,000 patients. Of those patients, 34 in 1,000 patients were infected and 12 in 1,000 patients were colonized. The APIC emphasizes the importance of good hand hygiene, including frequent hand washing, alcohol-based ... continue reading
    By Shine John, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM
    39,022 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Impingement syndromes can result in chronic ankle pain. Initially described as “athlete’s ankle” and “footballer’s ankle,” these syndromes have been associated with athletic activities such as soccer, running, volleyball, high jumping and ballet dancing.1-3 These syndromes can affect either the anterior or posterior aspect of the ankle joint and its causal pathway can be of soft tissue and/or osseous origin. Only one reported study describes impingement syndromes occurring concurrently at the anterior and posterior ankle.4 Pa ... continue reading
    By Lee C. Rogers, DPM
    10,297 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    43,404 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    Given the multifaceted nature of hallux limitus, having a strong understanding of the subject is vital for anyone who treats the feet. Indeed, hallux limitus is part of the discussion for a variety of conditions including hallux rigidus, hallux valgus, first MPJ arthritis, osteochondritis and first ray hypermobility. There are countless treatment solutions for hallux limitus depending on the nature of the pathology. Can one make any sense of the variety of topics related to hallux limitus? Is there a common ancestor to this pathology? If we know more about hallux limitus, is there a ... continue reading
    By G. “Dock” Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    278,369 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    It is late in the summer when a 29-year-old Caucasian female, employed as a medical assistant in your foot and ankle clinic, presents with a two-day history of red spots on her feet. The red spots became small fluid-filled vesicles, which are present mostly on the soles. She says she has broken one of the small vesicles and it expressed a clear fluid. The lesions are causing mild discomfort but are not very pruritic. Otherwise, she feels a little fatigued and reports a slightly elevated oral temperature today. Additionally, she reports a mild headache and a slight sore throat. She ... continue reading
    By Matt Sabo, DPM
    367,457 reads | 1 comments | 08/03/07
    By Kristin K. Titko, DPM
    3,648 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    If there is one thing that I have learned in the past eight years that I did not know in my first six years of practice, it is this: work does not have to be full tilt stress. In the past two years, I have nearly perfected this motto. While I am certain there is still room for improvement, I would like to share some of the changes that allow me to maintain my level of desired profit while minimizing the stress along the way. Let me first warn you that some of what I want to share may be controversial. Some ideas stray far from the commonly accepted ideas of many specialists. They ma ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    28,405 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    By John F. Connors, DPM, and Ana J. Sanz, DPM
    16,939 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/07
    To have a successful sports medicine practice, it is crucial to understand not only the foot and ankle but also the knee and hip, and the mechanism of injuries affecting these areas. Having the opportunity to treat and travel with the best runners in the world has forced me to have a stronger understanding of lower extremity biomechanics, the mechanics of running and the injuries associated with running. The knee is the most commonly injured part of the body in runners. Most of these injuries are chronic, overuse type of injuries. Knee injuries are often caused by a failure of the i ... continue reading