Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • March 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 3
    By Leonard Simmons, DPM
    2,655 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I may have retired from office practice, but I have not retired from the practice or profession of podiatry. Why did I leave office practice? Frankly, I got sick and tired of dealing with insurance companies, HMOs and managed care groups. I got tired of spending 15 minutes with a patient and 15 minutes with a chart. I got tired of time constraints, which denied me the pleasure of practicing the art of our profession. Looking back, I can tell you in total honesty that 40-plus years of practice seemed to go by about as quickly as a teenager can spend $20. There are so many differences between ... continue reading
    By Caroline A. Abbott, PhD, and Carine van Schie, PhD
    9,596 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Research in recent years has shown distinct ethnic differences in the prevalence of diabetic complications, including amputation and more recently, foot ulceration. Although the etiology of the diabetic complications among different ethnic groups is not completely understood, preliminary data has highlighted some interesting variations in the presentation of these complications. Projections of diabetes prevalence indicate the number of people with type 2 diabetes worldwide is set to double over a 25-year period.1 This epidemic of diabetes is due to an aging and increasingly obese population. ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy
    6,849 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recently released its revisions of the 2002 Clinical Practice Recommendations. Will these revisions lead to improved clarity, better outcomes and a heightened awareness of diagnostic indicators among all health care professionals? Those in the know seem to have a favorable impression. “Two of the association’s most critical position statements have been completely revised and several others have been updated, using the ADA’s system for grading scientific evidence to support clinical practice recommendations,” says Lee Sanders, DPM, the Former P... continue reading
    By Richard Braver, DPM
    20,859 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Distal posterior heel pain is a deformity we see quite often. It masquerades as chronic Achilles tendinitis, when in fact a calcaneal step (aka retrocalcaneal exostoses) is present at the Achilles insertion. You must also clinically differentiate it from adjacent problems, such as Haglund’s deformity, retrocalcaneal bursitis and intra-Achilles tendon tear. Often, these problems may be concurrent, however, you must treat the calcaneal exostoses for complete cessation of pain. Keep in mind that retrocalcaneal exostoses are most symptomatic in active individuals over 30. On inspection, you w... continue reading
    By John E. Hahn, DPM, ND
    11,307 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in the United States, with 15.7 million Americans afflicted with the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, and the primary cause of blindness in people (due to diabetic retinopathy) between the ages of 20 and 70.1 ... continue reading
    By Eric M. Feit, DPM, FACFAS and Alona Kashanian, DPM
    10,423 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It is typically easier to heal a diabetic foot ulcer than it is to prevent recurrence. Once you’ve healed the ulcer, the next challenge is to minimize pressure at the site of the old ulceration or the site of a boney prominence. If the patient has never had an ulcer but has a high risk for ulceration, then employing pressure off devices is essential for prevention. Obviously, the large majority of diabetic foot ulcerations are preventable. There are several keys to prevention, which include organized treatment protocols, early detection, aggressive wound care, orthotics and appropriate sho... continue reading
    By Ken Rehm, DPM
    6,645 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Diabetes is considered one of the most psychologically and behaviorally demanding of the chronic medical illnesses. Patients with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to depression. Indeed, up to one in every three diabetics has depression at a level that impairs functioning and quality of life, and lowers adherence to glucose monitoring, exercise, diet, medication regimes and glycemic control. As a result, depression increases the risk of long-term diabetic complications. When you use self-reporting surveys as a gauge, you’ll find an even broader spectrum of depressive illness in diabetic... continue reading
    Here is a MRI of an ankle that reveals increased intrasubstance signal and thickening within the peroneus brevis tendon.
    Babak Baravarian, DPM
    31,195 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It is often challenging to treat patients who have chronic ankle pain. There is an array of potential causes so it’s essential to be very thorough in arriving at your diagnosis. For example, consider the case of an active 34-year-old male who runs and plays tennis, basketball and beach volleyball. In the past six months, he says he has had acute ankle pain in certain situations and chronic pain in other situations. More specifically, the patient says the pain is worst when he is engaged in activities involving toe raises or when he is on the ball of his foot for extended periods of time. He... continue reading
    By Patricia L. Abu-Rumman, DPM, Barbara Aung, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM
    23,842 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    The prevalence of diabetic ulceration is alarmingly high and increasing. Currently, it is between 4 and 10 percent, depending on a host of factors including ethnicity, geographic region and duration of disease. Wounds are clearly associated with infection and a high risk of future amputation. The economic implications are overwhelming to the health care system. As clinicians, we must be able to rapidly identify, access and manipulate the factors necessary for wound healing. Indeed, it is vital to approach the wound healing process as a whole body process when you’re treating a patient who ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall
    2,407 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It seems like every other day, there is a new study pointing to alarming statistics about the increasing prevalance of diabetes. Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes, but many believe the figure may be even higher. It could get a lot worse. According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 million people in the U.S. are at risk for type II diabetes. Raising awareness of the disease and its potential complications continues to be a problem. Just as this issue went to press, results of a joint survey by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Ame... continue reading