Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 3
    Here is a MRI of an ankle that reveals increased intrasubstance signal and thickening within the peroneus brevis tendon.
    Babak Baravarian, DPM
    34,434 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    It is often challenging to treat patients who have chronic ankle pain. There is an array of potential causes so it’s essential to be very thorough in arriving at your diagnosis. For example, consider the case of an active 34-year-old male who runs and plays tennis, basketball and beach volleyball. In the past six months, he says he has had acute ankle pain in certain situations and chronic pain in other situations. More specifically, the patient says the pain is worst when he is engaged in activities involving toe raises or when he is on the ball of his foot for extended periods of time. He... continue reading
    By Patricia L. Abu-Rumman, DPM, Barbara Aung, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM
    24,659 reads | 1 comments | 03/03/02
    The prevalence of diabetic ulceration is alarmingly high and increasing. Currently, it is between 4 and 10 percent, depending on a host of factors including ethnicity, geographic region and duration of disease. Wounds are clearly associated with infection and a high risk of future amputation. The economic implications are overwhelming to the health care system. As clinicians, we must be able to rapidly identify, access and manipulate the factors necessary for wound healing. Indeed, it is vital to approach the wound healing process as a whole body process when you’re treating a patient who ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall
    2,541 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    It seems like every other day, there is a new study pointing to alarming statistics about the increasing prevalance of diabetes. Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes, but many believe the figure may be even higher. It could get a lot worse. According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 million people in the U.S. are at risk for type II diabetes. Raising awareness of the disease and its potential complications continues to be a problem. Just as this issue went to press, results of a joint survey by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Ame ... continue reading
    “Clearly, there are two schools of thought on doing a P&A  in the presence of a paronychia.”
—Dr. Joseph

    47,477 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    Is it an infection or an inflammation? That’s just one of the questions about the paronychia that came up during a roundtable discussion among DPMs. They also addressed the debate over doing a P&A for a paronychia, whether soaking is the ideal treatment and what you should do differently when treating a diabetic who has a paronychia. Here are their comments. Warren Joseph, DPM: Any of us who have had a paronychia know they hurt. These patients will come into your office and they are in pain. They’ve all been to their family doctor, their primary doctor if they’re HMO patients a... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    1,736 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02

    14,622 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    There have been many technological advances in wound care over the past decade, ranging from research into the wound healing model to the role of growth factors and the use of living skin constructs in clinical practice. With this in mind, our expert panelists take a closer look at Apligraf and their experiences in using this product. Q: Do you use Apligraf much in your practice? If so, when do you use it in the course of treatment? A: Both Robert Snyder, DPM, and Sheldon Ross, DPM, use Apligraf frequently in their practices. David Armstrong, DPM, says he uses Apligraf if he does no ... continue reading
    By Leonard Simmons, DPM
    2,786 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    I may have retired from office practice, but I have not retired from the practice or profession of podiatry. Why did I leave office practice? Frankly, I got sick and tired of dealing with insurance companies, HMOs and managed care groups. I got tired of spending 15 minutes with a patient and 15 minutes with a chart. I got tired of time constraints, which denied me the pleasure of practicing the art of our profession. Looking back, I can tell you in total honesty that 40-plus years of practice seemed to go by about as quickly as a teenager can spend $20. There are so many differences between ... continue reading
    By Caroline A. Abbott, PhD, and Carine van Schie, PhD
    10,154 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    Research in recent years has shown distinct ethnic differences in the prevalence of diabetic complications, including amputation and more recently, foot ulceration. Although the etiology of the diabetic complications among different ethnic groups is not completely understood, preliminary data has highlighted some interesting variations in the presentation of these complications. Projections of diabetes prevalence indicate the number of people with type 2 diabetes worldwide is set to double over a 25-year period.1 This epidemic of diabetes is due to an aging and increasingly obese population. ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy
    7,253 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recently released its revisions of the 2002 Clinical Practice Recommendations. Will these revisions lead to improved clarity, better outcomes and a heightened awareness of diagnostic indicators among all health care professionals? Those in the know seem to have a favorable impression. “Two of the association’s most critical position statements have been completely revised and several others have been updated, using the ADA’s system for grading scientific evidence to support clinical practice recommendations,” says Lee Sanders, DPM, the Former P ... continue reading
    By Richard Braver, DPM
    21,820 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/02
    Distal posterior heel pain is a deformity we see quite often. It masquerades as chronic Achilles tendinitis, when in fact a calcaneal step (aka retrocalcaneal exostoses) is present at the Achilles insertion. You must also clinically differentiate it from adjacent problems, such as Haglund’s deformity, retrocalcaneal bursitis and intra-Achilles tendon tear. Often, these problems may be concurrent, however, you must treat the calcaneal exostoses for complete cessation of pain. Keep in mind that retrocalcaneal exostoses are most symptomatic in active individuals over 30. On inspection, you w ... continue reading