Volume 20 - Issue 1 - January 2007

Feature »

Secrets To Treating Ankle Fractures In Athletes

By Damieon Brown, DPM, Lawrence DiDomenico, DPM, FACFAS, and Michael VanPelt, DPM | 46508 reads | 0 comments

      More and more people are in the pursuit of becoming active and staying fit. More often than not, individuals tend to achieve this goal by participating in sporting activities. Whether they are participating in intramural or competitive activities, these athletes place a great demand on the ankles and feet.

      According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System for 2000-2001, the ankle, knee and lower extremity were common sites of injury. The ankle joint is reportedly one of the most common sports-related injuries cli



Feature »

Point-Counterpoint: Probe To Bone: Is It The Best Test For Osteomyelitis?

By John S. Steinberg, DPM, and Warren S. Joseph, DPM | 10138 reads | 0 comments

      Yes. John S. Steinberg, DPM notes that the test is minimally invasive and easy to perform with sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values similar to those of MRI and bone scans.

By John S. Steinberg, DPM

      It comes down to patient selection and common sense. In the properly selected patient, the “probe to bone” test can be a very strong diagnostic tool in determining the presence of osteomyelitis at an ulcer site in the diabetic foot.

      Grayson, et. al., formally popularized and documented this import



Feature »

A New Approach To Treating Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

By David Lambarski, DPM, and Martin E. Wendelken, DPM, RN | 20665 reads | 0 comments

      The use of musculoskeletal ultrasound provides podiatric practitioners with non-invasive diagnostic capabilities in the office setting. In addition, this diagnostic tool can also assist with interventional medical techniques for treating a number of pathologic conditions. One may also combine ultrasound with duplex imaging and color Doppler to provide a vascular assessment tool.



Continuing Education »

How To Address Pediatric Intoeing

By Edwin Harris, DPM | 77444 reads | 0 comments

      Intoeing is one of the most common pediatric gait disturbances. Prompted by parental concerns, it accounts for a large number of new patient specialist visits. Intoeing is not a diagnosis. It is a complaint and an objective finding on physical examination. In spite of the frequent occurrence of pediatric intoeing, clinical management is complicated by diagnostic confusion and difference of opinion on both the necessity for treatment and its effectiveness. Intoeing has been the topic of many publications directed both toward primary care physicians and parents. However, inf



Feature »

Coding In 2007: What You Should Know

By Anthony Poggio, DPM | 13147 reads | 0 comments

      As the calendar turns to 2007, podiatrists should be aware of the changes to reimbursement codes instituted by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Starting on January 1, there are a number of changes that will affect Medicare billing. Accordingly, let us take a closer look at key CPT/ICD-9 codes that are more pertinent to podiatry.

      There are a number of changes to the CPT codes that practitioners should know. There is no 90-day grace period for deleted codes as there had been in the past. New CPT codes are valid as of January 1, 200



Treatment Dilemmas »

Key Insights On Surgical Correction Of Pediatric And Adult Flatfoot

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 16652 reads | 0 comments

      The correction of flatfoot deformity has been an evolving and somewhat troublesome treatment in the realm of foot and ankle ailments. The treatment has differed in children versus adults and has gained extended popularity as simpler procedures have become available. The problem with simple procedures is they do not always treat the full complex of the underlying deformity.

      Accordingly, let us take a closer look at the treatment of flatfoot in children and adolescents. We will consider the underlying deformity, its causes and treatment options. I wi



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