Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • December 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 12
    A 56-year-old Hispanic female with diabetes underwent an open partial first ray amputation (as shown above) and lower extremity angioplasties. A new study says one-third of Hispanic-American patients exhibit warning signs of diabetes.
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    12,489 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
        Podiatrists often face the challenge of patients with diabetes who are unaware they have the disease. A new survey commissioned by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) discovers that such problems are particularly challenging among Hispanic-American patients, finding that a significant percentage of this patient population exhibits the warning signs of the disease. ... continue reading
    As one can see, a useful sign that the treatment of monochloroacetic acid is over or near its end is the presence of lymphangitis, swelling and pain. This is not an infection but an inflammatory non-infectious aseptic lymphangitis.
    By Harvey Lemont, DPM
    115,647 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
          In general, plantar warts are very difficult to treat and pose a certain challenge to physicians and their patients. Both physicians and patients should not be discouraged by an initial poor result. With proper communication between the doctor and patient, one can achieve realistic outcomes.       Too often, doctors downplay treatment, only to be reproached by a frustrated and angry patient who received unrealistic expectations. For example, the treatment of chemosurgery using acids may take as long as six weeks. If the warts resolve in three weeks, the ... continue reading