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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • December 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 12
    A pressure mat, such as the MatScan system illustrated at left, contains several thousand sensing elements that allows one to detect multiple discrete plantar pressures and force loading parameters every few milliseconds. (Photo courtesy of Tekscan, Inc.)
    By Kevin A. Kirby, DPM, MS
    59,416 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
        The world of podiatric biomechanics is very different now than when Merton Root, DPM, created the first Department of Podiatric Biomechanics at the California College of Chiropody in San Francisco in 1966.1 During those exciting early years of development within the new subspecialty of “podiatric biomechanics,” Dr. Root and his podiatric colleagues created a classification system, based on the subtalar joint (STJ) neutral position, that remains to this day the most complete method by which to classify the structure of the foot and lower extremity.1,2... continue reading
    Here one can see a radiographic view of a severe Charcot foot deformity.
    By Michael S. Downey, DPM, FACFAS
    32,561 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Charcot osteoarthropathy remains a chronic, progressive and destructive process that often affects the bony architecture and joints of the foot and ankle, primarily in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Despite advances in the diagnosis and management of this condition, the deformity continues to be associated with a high incidence of recurrence, treatment failure and resultant morbidity. If left untreated, Charcot foot predictably leads to deformity, ulceration, infection and amputation.      The mainstays of treatment for the Charcot foot hav... continue reading