Volume 19 - Issue 12 - December 2006

Letters »

Authors: Orthoses Study Is 'Most Rigorous Of Its Kind'

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    We read with interest an article recently published in Podiatry Today, “Are Orthoses Effective Against Plantar Fasciitis In The Long Run?” (see page 8, September 2006). As the study investigators referred to in this article, we cannot let the opportunity pass to clear up some misconceptions presented in this article.1 In particular, we want to correct certain statements made by Russell Volpe, DPM, and Ronald Valmassy, DPM, regarding the research undertaken in our study.

    In the article, Dr. Volpe suggests that, “The fact that ort



News and Trends »

Survey: One-Third Of Hispanic Patients Exhibit Warning Signs Of Diabetes

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 12268 reads | 0 comments

    Podiatrists often face the challenge of patients with diabetes who are unaware they have the disease. A new survey commissioned by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) discovers that such problems are particularly challenging among Hispanic-American patients, finding that a significant percentage of this patient population exhibits the warning signs of the disease.



Editor's Perspective »

The FDA: Where Do We Go From Here?

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 1606 reads | 0 comments

    How bad have things gotten at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)? When you consider some of the recent reports and developments over the past few months, it is clear that the FDA has significant credibility issues.

    In June, a report by U.S. Rep. Henry A. Waxman revealed some eye-opening trends in FDA enforcement actions in recent years. According to the report, which reportedly involved an investigation and review of copious internal agency enforcement documentation, there was a greater than 50 percent decrease from 2000 to 2005 in the number of FDA



Diabetes Watch »

How To Achieve Optimal Perioperative Glycemic Control In Patients With Diabetes

By Emily A. Cook, DPM, Jeremy J. Cook, DPM, and Barry I. Rosenblum, DPM | 15967 reads | 0 comments

    As the role of the podiatric service becomes more integral to a multidisciplinary approach to diabetic limb salvage at an increasing number of institutions nationwide, many podiatric surgeons find themselves admitting these patients to their own service. The surgical and anesthesia teams often execute perioperative assessment and preparation, especially in non-elective procedures.

    This article serves as a primer in glucose management for podiatric surgeons working in this capacity and in no way supersedes the utility of a medical consult when indicated



Practice Builders »

Secrets To Obtaining 100 Percent Patient Satisfaction

By Kristin Titko, DPM | 7177 reads | 0 comments

    Do we all know the basics of how to make our patients’ visits satisfactory when they are in our office? What brings your patients back to your office once they have been there? What encourages your patients to send their friends, family and acquaintances to your practice? In today’s world of decreasing reimbursements for our hard work, we need to know how to work smarter so it does not feel like we are forced to work harder. Retaining patients and increasing the number of new patients we see can be easier than you think. All it requires is a little extra time and effort.



Sports Medicine »

Bike Fit Evaluation: Can It Help Diagnose And Prevent Cycling Injuries?

By Richard T. Bouché, DPM, Peter M. Vincent, DPM, and Katrina Sullivan, DPM | 15187 reads | 0 comments

    The sport of cycling has seen tremendous growth in the past decade. Athletes are utilizing bicycling not only as their primary sport but also as a form of cross training and rehabilitation. As a result of this growth, there has been a corresponding increase in the incidence of non-traumatic (overuse) injuries. Wilber, et. al., found 85 percent of cyclists to be suffering with one or more overuse injuries with the following distribution: neck (48.8 percent), knee (41.7 percent), groin and buttocks (36.1 percent), hand (31.1 percent) and back (30.3 percent).1

&



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