Volume 19 - Issue 12 - December 2006

Feature »

Emerging Concepts In Podiatric Biomechanics

By Kevin A. Kirby, DPM, MS | 56763 reads | 0 comments

    The world of podiatric biomechanics is very different now than when Merton Root, DPM, created the first Department of Podiatric Biomechanics at the California College of Chiropody in San Francisco in 1966.1 During those exciting early years of development within the new subspecialty of “podiatric biomechanics,” Dr. Root and his podiatric colleagues created a classification system, based on the subtalar joint (STJ) neutral position, that remains to this day the most complete method by which to classify the structure of the foot and lower extremity.1,2



Feature »

A Closer Look At Bone Stimulators For Charcot

By Michael S. Downey, DPM, FACFAS | 31445 reads | 0 comments

     Charcot osteoarthropathy remains a chronic, progressive and destructive process that often affects the bony architecture and joints of the foot and ankle, primarily in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Despite advances in the diagnosis and management of this condition, the deformity continues to be associated with a high incidence of recurrence, treatment failure and resultant morbidity. If left untreated, Charcot foot predictably leads to deformity, ulceration, infection and amputation.

     The mainstays of treatment for the Charcot foot hav



Feature »

A Guide To Cutaneous Manifestations Of Diabetes

By Jared Wilkinson, DPM, Michael Palladino, DPM, and Peter Blume, DPM | 23113 reads | 0 comments

      As the diabetic population continues to swell worldwide, there has also been an increased occurrence of various cutaneous manifestations associated with the disease. Researchers have reported a greater than 30 percent incidence of these disorders and they have been found in up to 70 percent of all patients with diabetes at some point during the course of their illness.1-5 Another problematic statistic for the diabetic population is the fact that 15 percent of all people with diabetes will experience at least one ulceration during their lifetime.6



Continuing Education »

Exploring Current Approaches To Plantar Warts

By Harvey Lemont, DPM | 111784 reads | 0 comments

      In general, plantar warts are very difficult to treat and pose a certain challenge to physicians and their patients. Both physicians and patients should not be discouraged by an initial poor result. With proper communication between the doctor and patient, one can achieve realistic outcomes.

      Too often, doctors downplay treatment, only to be reproached by a frustrated and angry patient who received unrealistic expectations. For example, the treatment of chemosurgery using acids may take as long as six weeks. If the warts resolve in three weeks, the



Dermatology Diagnosis »

Treating A Patient With Blisters And Papules On The Soles

By Gary “Dock” Dockery, DPM, FACFAS | 70211 reads | 0 comments

      A 29-year-old Caucasian female patient presented in consultation in the foot and ankle clinic regarding a six-week history of erythematous vesicles and papules on the soles. She reported intense pruritus. Her primary care physician told her that she had a case of “athlete’s feet” and that she should use an over-the-counter (OTC) antifungal cream. After two weeks of treatment with antifungal cream, the patient had no improvement.



Forum »

Taking Pride In Being 'Just A Podiatrist'

By John H. McCord, DPM | 4556 reads | 0 comments

    I am a podiatrist plain and simple. I use the word podiatrist when people asked about my occupation or specialty. That is a struggle for some of my colleagues in this profession.

    Many say, “I am a physician and surgeon of the ankle and foot (and in some states, parts of the leg).” It sounds like a box of chicken parts in the meat counter of a supermarket.

    I like using the word podiatrist. This gives me a marketing opportunity when another person is not familiar with our profession.

    I went to a podiatry sch



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