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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • November 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 11
    Molded cleats often have the rearfoot studs placed closer together on the heel. Turf shoes have a much wider base of support and ground contact, which enhances stability.
    By Christopher R. Corwin, DPM, MS, and David C. Erfle, DPM
    39,972 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
        Americans of all ages are participating in athletic activities, including football, at a higher level than ever before. Unfortunately, this also leads to an increased incidence of injury. Heel pain is a common complaint among athletes. It can be particularly disabling and result in a loss of playing time.     Heel pain comes in many forms: plantar fasciitis, Baxter’s neuritis, tarsal tunnel syndrome, calcaneal apophysitis, Achilles te... continue reading
    By Dave Nielson, DPM, FAPWCA and Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS
    11,290 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         While the concept of infections has been studied for many years, our current understanding of infections is based upon studies and observations of planktonic bacteria. This is free floating bacteria that cause diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, urinary tract infections, gas gangrene and many other examples. These types of infections often respond well to antibiotics and resolve without recurrence.      However, there are several infections that occur out of the typical sequence of planktonic bacterial infections. These infections occur postoperatively aft ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA, CWS
    37,960 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
        It is universally accepted that the most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis.1 In this same vein, there is a widespread perception that plantar fasciitis is often easily treated with whatever eclectic “recipe” an individual has developed.     Interestingly, even our present use of the term “fasciitis” is erroneous, not to mention that there is a huge gap between our general understanding and what basic medical science demonstrates in regard to our clinical understanding and treatment of plantar fasciitis. There have been rec ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    27,089 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         Treating puncture wounds in the lower extremity can be challenging, especially given the potential for retained foreign bodies. In the first part of a discussion, our expert panelists discuss appropriate workup and diagnostic studies for such wounds, offer their perspectives on imaging modalities, and impart a few helpful surgical pearls.      Q: What are your general workup/diagnostic studies for a plantar foot puncture wound?      A: Molly Judge, DPM emphasizes obtaining a thorough medical history as well as a very concise accou ... continue reading