Volume 19 - Issue 11 - November 2006

Continuing Education »

How To Address Mechanically-Induced Subcalcaneal Pain

By Paul R. Scherer, DPM, and Lori L. Waters, BSc, BEd | 14801 reads | 0 comments

    Given the abundance of articles written about heel pain and plantar fasciitis, practitioners may wonder whether there is anything new to learn. The prevalence of this condition accounts for the amount of press that it gets, both in the medical community and in the news, but are all the articles and studies discussing the same thing? The numerous opinions and conflicting data may indicate that heel pain is more complicated than people realize. Perhaps some variable has been omitted in the research that contributes to the conflicting outcomes.

    Many ter



Feature »

How To Solve The Mystery Of Declining Accounts Receivable

By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CFP, CMP, and Hope Rachel Hetico, RN, MHA, CMP | 7034 reads | 0 comments

     Accounts receivable (A/R) represent free cash flow that is the lifeblood of any medical practice. Staying on top of A/R enables a practice to pay the bills, take care of office payroll and satisfy operational obligations. In the reimbursement climate that exists today, it is not unusual for A/R to represent 75 percent of a hospital’s investments in current assets. For podiatrists, it is not unusual for 30 percent or more of all office A/R to be more than 120 days old.

     A feature of A/Rs that makes them unique is the settlement for less than billed



News and Trends »

Studies Assess Impact Of Valdecoxib For Post-Bunionectomy Pain

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 9180 reads | 0 comments

     When patients have pain after a bunionectomy procedure, what are the best options for providing pain relief? Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, recently published in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, note that patients who took valdecoxib (Bextra, Pfizer)



Diabetes Watch »

Can Endovascular Atherectomy Be Beneficial In Diabetic Limb Salvage?

By Peter Wilusz, DPM, and Guy Pupp, DPM | 14651 reads | 0 comments

     The non-traumatic lower extremity amputation rate among people with diabetes mellitus has increased 38 percent from 1992 to 2002.1 The number of amputations has increased from 99,552 in 2000 to 110,000 in 2002.2 To appreciate this statistic, this is more than double the number of amputations on U.S. soldiers from the Civil War through Vietnam.3

     Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is largely undiagnosed. Of the estimated 12 million Americans with PAD, 2.5 million are diagnosed and only 4 percent are treated interventio



Surgical Pearls »

Biofilms And Infection: What You Should Know

By Dave Nielson, DPM, FAPWCA and Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS | 10351 reads | 0 comments

     While the concept of infections has been studied for many years, our current understanding of infections is based upon studies and observations of planktonic bacteria. This is free floating bacteria that cause diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, urinary tract infections, gas gangrene and many other examples. These types of infections often respond well to antibiotics and resolve without recurrence.

     However, there are several infections that occur out of the typical sequence of planktonic bacterial infections. These infections occur postoperatively aft



Wound Care Q&A »

Inside Insights On Treating Puncture Wounds

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 25547 reads | 0 comments

     Treating puncture wounds in the lower extremity can be challenging, especially given the potential for retained foreign bodies. In the first part of a discussion, our expert panelists discuss appropriate workup and diagnostic studies for such wounds, offer their perspectives on imaging modalities, and impart a few helpful surgical pearls.

     Q: What are your general workup/diagnostic studies for a plantar foot puncture wound?

     A: Molly Judge, DPM emphasizes obtaining a thorough medical history as well as a very concise accou