Volume 19 - Issue 11 - November 2006

Editor's Perspective »

Reexamining The Fundamentals In Treating Plantar Fasciitis (Or Plantar Fasciosis)

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 2450 reads | 0 comments

     When we put our editorial calendar together each year, one of the struggles is putting together an entire theme issue of fresh perspectives on heel pain. It is one of the most common conditions that DPMs see in practice and plantar fasciitis reportedly accounts for over 1 million patient visits a year in the United States. Given the prevalence of the condition, we continue to address this topic in depth every November. Hopefully, the collection of feature articles in our 7th Annual Heel Pain Theme issue will stimulate discussion and debate.

     In the cov



Forum »

When Good Help Is Hard To Find

By Lara Allman, DPM | 2630 reads | 0 comments

     I have been reading podiatry articles for pointers on how to run an office for the last eight years of private practice. I have adopted the advice of all the practice management gurus in our professional world. They write with ease and enjoyment on the how-to’s of conducting employee interviews, compiling employee manuals, creating job descriptions, how to train, how to treat staff and so on. I have absorbed this advice and feel they provide good tips for facilitating a good working environment.

     I condone open communication with my staff so we can



Feature »

Conquering Posterior Heel Pain In Athletes

By Christopher R. Corwin, DPM, MS, and David C. Erfle, DPM | 32770 reads | 0 comments

    Americans of all ages are participating in athletic activities, including football, at a higher level than ever before. Unfortunately, this also leads to an increased incidence of injury. Heel pain is a common complaint among athletes. It can be particularly disabling and result in a loss of playing time.

    Heel pain comes in many forms: plantar fasciitis, Baxter’s neuritis, tarsal tunnel syndrome, calcaneal apophysitis, Achilles te



Feature »

Should You Change Your Approach To Plantar Fasciosis?

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA, CWS | 30692 reads | 0 comments

    It is universally accepted that the most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis.1 In this same vein, there is a widespread perception that plantar fasciitis is often easily treated with whatever eclectic “recipe” an individual has developed.

    Interestingly, even our present use of the term “fasciitis” is erroneous, not to mention that there is a huge gap between our general understanding and what basic medical science demonstrates in regard to our clinical understanding and treatment of plantar fasciitis. There have been rec



Feature »

How To Perform An In-Step Plantar Fasciotomy

By Lawrence Karlock, DPM, FACFAS,and Dan Kirk, DPM | 42275 reads | 0 comments

    Heel pain is obviously one of the most common complaints we see in podiatric office. The causes of heel pain are varied and include tarsal tunnel syndrome, Baxter’s neuritis, calcaneal stress fracture and spondyloarthropathies, just to name a few. For the majority of these patients, the diagnosis is plantar fasciitis.

    Many of these patients will get better with conservative care, which includes stretching, orthotic devices and steroid injections. Those who still have pain may find relief with extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Patients who still d



Feature »

How To Detect Chronic Heel Pain With Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

By John Tassone Jr., DPM | 12246 reads | 0 comments

    Throughout the previous three decades, technological advances paved the way for the use of sonography in diagnosing and assessing musculoskeletal pathology. Continued innovations in this arena have led to affordable portable units that enable private office practitioners to utilize ultrasonography. Use of these units has grown over the last five years, especially in rheumatology. In fact, one leading ultrasound company has turned all of its advertising attention from the podiatry profession to rheumatology. However, podiatry still remains a formidable market for the portable