Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 11
    By Peter Wilusz, DPM, and Guy Pupp, DPM
    15,183 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         The non-traumatic lower extremity amputation rate among people with diabetes mellitus has increased 38 percent from 1992 to 2002.1 The number of amputations has increased from 99,552 in 2000 to 110,000 in 2002.2 To appreciate this statistic, this is more than double the number of amputations on U.S. soldiers from the Civil War through Vietnam.3      Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is largely undiagnosed. Of the estimated 12 million Americans with PAD, 2.5 million are diagnosed and only 4 percent are treated interventio ... continue reading
    By Lara Allman, DPM
    2,983 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         I have been reading podiatry articles for pointers on how to run an office for the last eight years of private practice. I have adopted the advice of all the practice management gurus in our professional world. They write with ease and enjoyment on the how-to’s of conducting employee interviews, compiling employee manuals, creating job descriptions, how to train, how to treat staff and so on. I have absorbed this advice and feel they provide good tips for facilitating a good working environment.      I condone open communication with my staff so we can ... continue reading
    By Dave Nielson, DPM, FAPWCA and Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS
    10,922 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         While the concept of infections has been studied for many years, our current understanding of infections is based upon studies and observations of planktonic bacteria. This is free floating bacteria that cause diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, urinary tract infections, gas gangrene and many other examples. These types of infections often respond well to antibiotics and resolve without recurrence.      However, there are several infections that occur out of the typical sequence of planktonic bacterial infections. These infections occur postoperatively aft ... continue reading
    Molded cleats often have the rearfoot studs placed closer together on the heel. Turf shoes have a much wider base of support and ground contact, which enhances stability.
    By Christopher R. Corwin, DPM, MS, and David C. Erfle, DPM
    39,172 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
        Americans of all ages are participating in athletic activities, including football, at a higher level than ever before. Unfortunately, this also leads to an increased incidence of injury. Heel pain is a common complaint among athletes. It can be particularly disabling and result in a loss of playing time.     Heel pain comes in many forms: plantar fasciitis, Baxter’s neuritis, tarsal tunnel syndrome, calcaneal apophysitis, Achilles te... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    26,534 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         Treating puncture wounds in the lower extremity can be challenging, especially given the potential for retained foreign bodies. In the first part of a discussion, our expert panelists discuss appropriate workup and diagnostic studies for such wounds, offer their perspectives on imaging modalities, and impart a few helpful surgical pearls.      Q: What are your general workup/diagnostic studies for a plantar foot puncture wound?      A: Molly Judge, DPM emphasizes obtaining a thorough medical history as well as a very concise accou ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA, CWS
    36,507 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
        It is universally accepted that the most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis.1 In this same vein, there is a widespread perception that plantar fasciitis is often easily treated with whatever eclectic “recipe” an individual has developed.     Interestingly, even our present use of the term “fasciitis” is erroneous, not to mention that there is a huge gap between our general understanding and what basic medical science demonstrates in regard to our clinical understanding and treatment of plantar fasciitis. There have been rec ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    124,039 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
         The past several “Treatment Dilemmas” columns have dealt with the treatment of chronic ankle pain subsequent to an ankle sprain (see page 92, July issue and page 88, September issue). We have dealt with the actual ligament injury and its repair, treatment of peroneal tendon injuries and also conservative care of ankle injuries. We will now discuss the final common problem, which involves the treatment options for osteochondral lesions of the talus.      An osteochondral lesion is an injury or small fracture of the cartilage surface of the talus. Ther ... continue reading
    By Lawrence Karlock, DPM, FACFAS,and Dan Kirk, DPM
    49,717 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
        Heel pain is obviously one of the most common complaints we see in podiatric office. The causes of heel pain are varied and include tarsal tunnel syndrome, Baxter’s neuritis, calcaneal stress fracture and spondyloarthropathies, just to name a few. For the majority of these patients, the diagnosis is plantar fasciitis.     Many of these patients will get better with conservative care, which includes stretching, orthotic devices and steroid injections. Those who still have pain may find relief with extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Patients who still d ... continue reading

    4,691 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
    Patients come in many sizes and may need different sizes of bunion relief.       The new Comfort Gel Skin™ comes in four different models with various gel thicknesses and options for covers, according to the manufacturer Gel Smart. The sleeves available are the 5 mm Comfort Bunion Relief Pad and the 3 mm Dress Bunion Relief Pad.       The company says the product combines flexibility with specialized textiles, which move with and conform to the gels. The gels add thickness while maintaining pliability and stretch for comfort, according ... continue reading
    By John Tassone Jr., DPM
    14,120 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/06
        Throughout the previous three decades, technological advances paved the way for the use of sonography in diagnosing and assessing musculoskeletal pathology. Continued innovations in this arena have led to affordable portable units that enable private office practitioners to utilize ultrasonography. Use of these units has grown over the last five years, especially in rheumatology. In fact, one leading ultrasound company has turned all of its advertising attention from the podiatry profession to rheumatology. However, podiatry still remains a formidable market for the portable ... continue reading