Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 10
    By Douglas Richie, Jr., DPM
    35,993 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Podiatric physicians use foot orthotics daily to treat a myriad of lower extremity conditions. Yet while the foot orthotics industry has been growing each year, researchers in the field of biomechanics have begun to challenge previous clinical studies showing that foot orthotics really work. At the same time, third party insurance payors have started questioning the value of foot orthotic therapy on the grounds that this treatment intervention is “experimental” and still without verification of the overall benefit.      Podiatric physicians may have a ... continue reading
    Researchers suggest the use of substances such as silicone (as shown above) may facilitate significant improvement in soft tissue thickness and a profound reduction in plantar pressure.
    By Stephanie C.S. Wu, DPM, MS, Nicholas J. Bevilacqua, DPM, Lee C. Rogers, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD
    12,373 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         The rapid rise in the incidence of diabetes, a serious lifelong condition, is of alarming concern to healthcare professionals. Recent data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that approximately 20.8 million people, roughly 7 percent of the United States population, have diabetes.1 In 2005 alone, 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older.1 Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration, which often results in lower extremity amputations, is one of the most common comp... continue reading
    A recent study found that 25.5 percent of veterans at one VA facility wear correctly sized shoes. Researchers says patients with a diabetic foot ulcer are 5.1 times more likely to be wearing incorrectly sized shoes than those without ulceration. (Photo co
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    9,017 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Study: Wrong Shoe Size In Veterans Tied To Diabetic Ulcers      Shoes that fit poorly are often named as a factor in the development of diabetic foot ulcers. A recent study in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association (JAPMA) questioned whether veterans wear appropriately sized shoes and found that three-quarters of those studied did not.      Study authors evaluated the shoe sizes of 440 veterans at Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Of those, 58.4 percent had diabetes and 6.8 percent had an active diabetic... continue reading
    This patient is demonstrating heavy-load eccentric calf muscle training as part of a 12-week rehabilitation program.
    By Edward G. Blahous Jr., DPM
    52,090 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         When you perform a literature review on Achilles tendinopathy, be prepared to be inundated with a litany of citations. Literally hundreds of articles annually are dedicated to the investigation of this relatively enigmatic tendon. Some will focus on histological findings and others will feature anecdotal clinical investigations. A multitude of studies featuring newer, so-called “alternative” therapies are introduced and all the while, review-type articles of variable depth will litter your search.      Suffice it to say, filtering through this amount ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    2,759 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         The numbers jump out at you. Steven Peltz, CHBC, a leading practice management consultant, estimates that over 40 percent of an average practice’s accounts receivable are over 90 days old. As Peltz points out, this may signify a lack of a sound process for collecting on overdue accounts or perhaps less effort in collecting on older claims and denials as they may be more difficult and time-consuming than collecting on more recent claims.      This is one of the salient points that emerges from Peltz’s cover story, “In-House Billing: Assessing The Pros... continue reading
    Here one can see an open arthroscopic synovectomy and primary repair of the plantar plate of the second MPJ.
    By Kerry Zang, DPM
    32,911 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Plantar plate derangement with synovitis of the metatarsophalangeal joint complex is a progressively degenerative condition with an inflammatory component.1 Recent clinical experience suggests that one can treat these pathologies successfully using plasma-mediated, radiofrequency-based microdebridement.      While the plantar plate of the metatarsophalangeal joint shows signs of degeneration, the metatarsophalangeal joint complex itself is inflamed (i.e. synovitis). Clinicians often find this condition in conjunction with the triad of hallux ab... continue reading
    Patients with diabetes can use Exubera (Pfizer) to inhale insulin. As the authors note, insulin is absorbed more rapidly through inhalation than through subcutaneous injection.
    By Jennifer Pahira and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    8,701 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), diabetes affects more than 230 million people worldwide and is expected to affect 350 million by 2025. Controlling blood glucose levels via subcutaneous injections of insulin has been a key clinical intervention for many people. While injected insulin has proven to be a reliable intervention, it is met with significant resistance by patients who want to avoid the stigma and pain associated with this therapy.      Over the years, extensive research has been conducted in an effort to develop a less i... continue reading
    Older patients are more likely to have had foot surgeries causing iatrogenic deformities (as one can see above) that have had two or three decades to develop or become worse.
    By William D. Fishco, DPM, FACFAS
    19,169 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         In regard to traditional perceptions, we need to redefine our approach to geriatric patients. Somewhere along the way in our training, we are taught that once people reach 65 years old, they are given the demographic label “geriatric.” As a result, there is a tendency to shy away from presenting surgical options for these patients due to fears that they may not heal, their bones are too brittle or that they have too many medical problems. The common excuses that I hear include: “too old,” “too risky,” “won’t heal” and “just live with it.” It is not unc... continue reading
    A podiatric practice has marketing goals for both current and new patients. A patient newsletter can be an important way to communicate with and educate patients.
    By William N. McCann, DPM
    4,141 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         The excitement has been building for months. The whole family has been packing, reviewing brochures, talking about the spectacular scenery and preparing for what they expect to be the vacation of a lifetime. The day of departure arrives and the whole family loads into the packed station wagon for the fun-filled, two-week adventure. Starting down the road, you have a general idea of the direction of your destination but nothing more. Who needs a map? Just head south and ask at convenience stores along the way. The locals are always helpful.      Would you e... continue reading
    By Gary “Dock” Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    20,685 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         A 30-year-old Caucasian female brings her 3-week-old son into the clinic with a skin condition on both feet. The mother reports that the pregnancy was uncomplicated. She says the baby was born full-term with a normal birth weight of 7.2 pounds and no problems noted.      The mother also says she was healthy before and during the pregnancy, and that she is not taking any prescription medications or other drugs. She has been taking regular perinatal vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C and E, as directed by her personal obstetrician. The mother denies... continue reading