Volume 19 - Issue 10 - October 2006

Feature »

In-House Billing: Assessing The Pros And Cons

By Steven Peltz, CHBC | 5959 reads | 0 comments

Should you go with in-house billing for your podiatric services or use a billing company? A leading practice management consultant presents the pros and cons of each option, and offers inside secrets for evaluating the effectiveness of either option.



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Chronic Ankle Instability: Can Orthotics Help?

By Douglas Richie, Jr., DPM | 31457 reads | 0 comments

     Podiatric physicians use foot orthotics daily to treat a myriad of lower extremity conditions. Yet while the foot orthotics industry has been growing each year, researchers in the field of biomechanics have begun to challenge previous clinical studies showing that foot orthotics really work. At the same time, third party insurance payors have started questioning the value of foot orthotic therapy on the grounds that this treatment intervention is “experimental” and still without verification of the overall benefit.

     Podiatric physicians may have a



Feature »

Tissue Volumizing: Can We Create An Internal Orthotic?

By Stephanie C.S. Wu, DPM, MS, Nicholas J. Bevilacqua, DPM, Lee C. Rogers, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD | 11299 reads | 0 comments

     The rapid rise in the incidence of diabetes, a serious lifelong condition, is of alarming concern to healthcare professionals. Recent data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that approximately 20.8 million people, roughly 7 percent of the United States population, have diabetes.1 In 2005 alone, 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older.1 Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration, which often results in lower extremity amputations, is one of the most common comp



Feature »

Achilles Tendinopathy: What Are The Best Treatment Options?

By Edward G. Blahous Jr., DPM | 46924 reads | 0 comments

     When you perform a literature review on Achilles tendinopathy, be prepared to be inundated with a litany of citations. Literally hundreds of articles annually are dedicated to the investigation of this relatively enigmatic tendon. Some will focus on histological findings and others will feature anecdotal clinical investigations. A multitude of studies featuring newer, so-called “alternative” therapies are introduced and all the while, review-type articles of variable depth will litter your search.

     Suffice it to say, filtering through this amount



Feature »

An Alternative Approach To Plantar Plate Derangement

By Kerry Zang, DPM | 28918 reads | 0 comments

     Plantar plate derangement with synovitis of the metatarsophalangeal joint complex is a progressively degenerative condition with an inflammatory component.1 Recent clinical experience suggests that one can treat these pathologies successfully using plasma-mediated, radiofrequency-based microdebridement.

     While the plantar plate of the metatarsophalangeal joint shows signs of degeneration, the metatarsophalangeal joint complex itself is inflamed (i.e. synovitis). Clinicians often find this condition in conjunction with the triad of hallux ab



Continuing Education »

A Guide To Foot Surgery For The Geriatric Patient

By William D. Fishco, DPM, FACFAS | 17458 reads | 0 comments

     In regard to traditional perceptions, we need to redefine our approach to geriatric patients. Somewhere along the way in our training, we are taught that once people reach 65 years old, they are given the demographic label “geriatric.” As a result, there is a tendency to shy away from presenting surgical options for these patients due to fears that they may not heal, their bones are too brittle or that they have too many medical problems. The common excuses that I hear include: “too old,” “too risky,” “won’t heal” and “just live with it.” It is not unc



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