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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • September 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 9
    Note the venous stasis ulceration above. Its chronic nature may be due to protease imbalance and a fibrotic base.
    By Amy Jelinek, DPM, and Vickie Driver, DPM, FACFAS
    23,257 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Wound healing is a process that involves the stages of coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation and repair of the matrix, epithelialization and remodeling of the scar tissue. These stages overlap and the entire process can last for months.1    During the post-injury coagulation phase, platelets initiate the wound healing process by releasing a number of soluble mediators including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growt... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    1,276 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         In all walks of life, we see and encounter people with varying levels of ambition. Some folks strive to reach overarching goals and wind up taking on way more than they can handle in the pursuit of a greater good. They lead by example, they are always thinking of how to improve things and wind up investing a significant amount of time toward achieving fundamental changes. These folks are also not afraid to ruffle a few feathers along the way.      You also see folks I like to call “political climbers.” They are also smart, driven people but tend to be ... continue reading
    Here is a view of AlloMatrix-C, a demineralized bone matrix hybrid composite.
    By Mark D. Dollard, DPM, FACFAS, and Glenn Weinraub, DPM, FACFAS
    19,378 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Surgeons have traditionally relied upon autografts, replacement bone from sources within the patient’s own body, as the gold standard for graft remodeling in bone fracture and primary osseous repair. While autograft bone is superior in its ability to provide osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), it has the inherent problem of limited supply and morbidity associated with harvesting from donor sites. Given these limitations, there has been a need for orthobiologic bone substitutes and these products continue to emerge and evolve as viable graft alternatives.  &nbs... continue reading
    Here one can see “distal subungual” onychomycosis, which has probably developed as the result of precursory onycholysis.
    By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO
    30,467 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       As all those who specialize in the treatment of lower extremity ailments will acknowledge, there is nothing uncommon about nail unit pathology. Though pristine appearing nail units are commonplace in children, advancing age may bring a combination of acute and chronic trauma, neoplastic processes, non-infectious dermatological diseases, and bona-fide mycotic and non-mycotic infections that take their toll. These stressors manifest as alterations in nail color, shape and/or texture.    Too often in mainstream medicine, there is a tendency to attribute such c... continue reading