Volume 19 - Issue 9 - September 2006

Feature »

Bioabsorbable Implants For Flatfoot: Can They Work?

By Jeffrey S. Boberg, DPM, FACFAS, Timothy Oldani, DPM, and Nicholas Martin, DPM | 27885 reads | 0 comments

   The balance between technology and clinical practice is difficult to obtain. In the past, technology lagged far behind. Innovative thought and technique was stymied by the inability to develop practical instrumentation and implants. In recent years, however, the opposite effect has occurred. New materials and devices have inundated the marketplace. While these devices have been demonstrated to be safe, they are not necessarily any more efficacious and are certainly more costly than existing products.

   Indeed, practitioners must be vigilant in evaluating t



Feature »

Current Concepts In Managing The Wound Microenvironment

By Amy Jelinek, DPM, and Vickie Driver, DPM, FACFAS | 22703 reads | 0 comments

   Wound healing is a process that involves the stages of coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation and repair of the matrix, epithelialization and remodeling of the scar tissue. These stages overlap and the entire process can last for months.1

   During the post-injury coagulation phase, platelets initiate the wound healing process by releasing a number of soluble mediators including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growt



Feature »

A Pertinent Primer On Current Orthobiologics

By Mark D. Dollard, DPM, FACFAS, and Glenn Weinraub, DPM, FACFAS | 18920 reads | 0 comments

   Surgeons have traditionally relied upon autografts, replacement bone from sources within the patient’s own body, as the gold standard for graft remodeling in bone fracture and primary osseous repair. While autograft bone is superior in its ability to provide osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), it has the inherent problem of limited supply and morbidity associated with harvesting from donor sites. Given these limitations, there has been a need for orthobiologic bone substitutes and these products continue to emerge and evolve as viable graft alternatives.

 &nbs



Continuing Education »

A Guide To Detecting Nail Pathology

By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO | 29693 reads | 0 comments

   As all those who specialize in the treatment of lower extremity ailments will acknowledge, there is nothing uncommon about nail unit pathology. Though pristine appearing nail units are commonplace in children, advancing age may bring a combination of acute and chronic trauma, neoplastic processes, non-infectious dermatological diseases, and bona-fide mycotic and non-mycotic infections that take their toll. These stressors manifest as alterations in nail color, shape and/or texture.

   Too often in mainstream medicine, there is a tendency to attribute such c



Feature »

How To Obtain Premium Value For Your Practice

By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS | 5472 reads | 0 comments

   Many podiatric physicians are suddenly realizing the importance of their practice as a retirement asset. The sale of a practice, its value and the associated terms of the sale can either substantially supplement a retirement nest egg or be the source of retirement delaying frustration. Understanding the process of a practice transaction or sale, and having a deliberate and proactive strategy to enhance the value of the practice are likely to reduce the stress and frustration in addition to providing some supplementary retirement funds.

   There are a my



Treatment Dilemmas »

Persistent Pain After Ankle Sprain: Is A Peroneal Tendon Injury The Cause?

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 123785 reads | 0 comments

   In a follow-up to the last column (see “A Guide To Treating Ankle Sprains From Start To Finish, pg. 92, June issue), I would like to discuss common secondary injuries that often occur in relation to ankle injuries, especially sprains. One of the most common and often misdiagnosed secondary complications of ankle sprains is a tear or injury to the peroneal tendon(s).

   Since the tendons are in such close proximity to the lateral ankle and the lateral ankle is most often injured during a sprain, there is a tendency to perceive the two painful regions as on



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