Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • September 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 9
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    12,425 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
    Bioengineered alternative tissues, or skin substitutes, can lead to success in patients with wounds that have not responded well to other modalities. Accordingly, our expert panelists offer a closer look at where these products fit into the wound healing armamentarium and share pertinent pearls from their clinical experience with these products. Q: What skin substitutes do you utilize in treating lower extremity wounds? A: Paul Kim, DPM, has had success using Apligraf® (Organogenesis) for more superficial chronic wounds. He cautions practitioners that it may take multipl ... continue reading

    4,332 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
    Get Closure On Wounds A new primary wound closure product may offer your patients comfort and a good cosmetic appearance.      The Steri-Strip™ S Surgical Skin Closure can be helpful in managing low-tension lacerations and surgical incisions, according to the product’s manufacturer 3M. The company cites a recent study that demonstrated that closure of surgical wounds with the non-invasive device was two minutes shorter than with simple running sutures.      Steri-Strip is made of soft polyurethane pads and interlaced polyest ... continue reading
    By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM
    10,692 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
       Foot and ankle surgeons have no shortage of choices when it comes to selecting instruments for surgical procedures. Our surgical team has found success in using the Koby line of instruments (OsteoMed) for the treatment of various conditions.    For the last four years, surgeons have found success using Koby instruments for three procedures commonly performed in the foot and ankle. Koby instruments are designed to perform the partial plantar fasciotomy for heel spur syndrome, intermetatarsal ligament decompression of neuroma and release of the gastrocnemius ... continue reading
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    3,559 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
    By Jeffrey S. Boberg, DPM, FACFAS, Timothy Oldani, DPM, and Nicholas Martin, DPM
    28,846 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
       The balance between technology and clinical practice is difficult to obtain. In the past, technology lagged far behind. Innovative thought and technique was stymied by the inability to develop practical instrumentation and implants. In recent years, however, the opposite effect has occurred. New materials and devices have inundated the marketplace. While these devices have been demonstrated to be safe, they are not necessarily any more efficacious and are certainly more costly than existing products.    Indeed, practitioners must be vigilant in evaluating t ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,827 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
         I am taking another short break from podiatry, the job I love. Being a small town DPM provides lots of perks but it can also drive a person nuts.      Last Thursday was the day from hell. It started with two difficult surgeries. One was a lady with hallux valgus who was in for her third operation. The first two attempts with me as the surgeon had failed miserably. I asked why she was going to trust me for a third attempt. She told me I knew her expectation better than anyone else. Performing that surgery was like walking the plank.      T ... continue reading
    By Amy Jelinek, DPM, and Vickie Driver, DPM, FACFAS
    23,549 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
       Wound healing is a process that involves the stages of coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation and repair of the matrix, epithelialization and remodeling of the scar tissue. These stages overlap and the entire process can last for months.1    During the post-injury coagulation phase, platelets initiate the wound healing process by releasing a number of soluble mediators including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growt ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    1,323 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
         In all walks of life, we see and encounter people with varying levels of ambition. Some folks strive to reach overarching goals and wind up taking on way more than they can handle in the pursuit of a greater good. They lead by example, they are always thinking of how to improve things and wind up investing a significant amount of time toward achieving fundamental changes. These folks are also not afraid to ruffle a few feathers along the way.      You also see folks I like to call “political climbers.” They are also smart, driven people but tend to be ... continue reading
    Here is a view of AlloMatrix-C, a demineralized bone matrix hybrid composite.
    By Mark D. Dollard, DPM, FACFAS, and Glenn Weinraub, DPM, FACFAS
    19,665 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
       Surgeons have traditionally relied upon autografts, replacement bone from sources within the patient’s own body, as the gold standard for graft remodeling in bone fracture and primary osseous repair. While autograft bone is superior in its ability to provide osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), it has the inherent problem of limited supply and morbidity associated with harvesting from donor sites. Given these limitations, there has been a need for orthobiologic bone substitutes and these products continue to emerge and evolve as viable graft alternatives.  &nbs... continue reading
    By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO
    30,843 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/06
       As all those who specialize in the treatment of lower extremity ailments will acknowledge, there is nothing uncommon about nail unit pathology. Though pristine appearing nail units are commonplace in children, advancing age may bring a combination of acute and chronic trauma, neoplastic processes, non-infectious dermatological diseases, and bona-fide mycotic and non-mycotic infections that take their toll. These stressors manifest as alterations in nail color, shape and/or texture.    Too often in mainstream medicine, there is a tendency to attribute such c ... continue reading