Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 9
    Peter Wilusz, DPM, says his own independent study has found linezolid to be safe and it penetrates further into bone in comparison to vancomycin.
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    10,332 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Are Orthoses Effective Against Plantar Fasciitis In The Long Run?      Orthoses are an integral part of the podiatric armamentarium to treat plantar fasciitis. However, a recent study calls into question the long-term efficacy of using orthoses to treat the condition.      The study, which was published in a recent issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, looked at 135 patients with plantar fasciitis, who were randomized to wear either a prefabricated orthosis made of firm foam, a customized orthosis made of semirigid plastic or a sham orth... continue reading
    By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS
    5,651 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Many podiatric physicians are suddenly realizing the importance of their practice as a retirement asset. The sale of a practice, its value and the associated terms of the sale can either substantially supplement a retirement nest egg or be the source of retirement delaying frustration. Understanding the process of a practice transaction or sale, and having a deliberate and proactive strategy to enhance the value of the practice are likely to reduce the stress and frustration in addition to providing some supplementary retirement funds.    There are a my ... continue reading
    Here is a preoperative weightbearing lateral radiograph that shows typical Charcot changes. Note the equinus deformity with midfoot plantar prominence and severe destruction of the tarsometatarsal joint.
    By Lee C. Rogers, DPM, Nicholas J. Bevilacqua, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD
    12,315 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Charcot’s arthropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes mellitus that frequently leads to permanent disability, ulceration and amputation. It is a rapidly progressive and severe form of arthritis. Researchers have equated the acute Charcot foot to a medical emergency since therapies are available that may alter its natural history.1 Unfortunately, the pathophysiology and development are poorly understood. This is frequently complicated by a delay in diagnosis until bony destruction is visible on plain radiographs. This delay often leads to worse outcome... continue reading
    Here one can see a longitudinal fray tear in a patient who had chronic ankle instability.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    134,186 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       In a follow-up to the last column (see “A Guide To Treating Ankle Sprains From Start To Finish, pg. 92, June issue), I would like to discuss common secondary injuries that often occur in relation to ankle injuries, especially sprains. One of the most common and often misdiagnosed secondary complications of ankle sprains is a tear or injury to the peroneal tendon(s).    Since the tendons are in such close proximity to the lateral ankle and the lateral ankle is most often injured during a sprain, there is a tendency to perceive the two painful regions as on... continue reading
    This intraoperative photo shows a chronic wound after debridement. The surgeon has applied Integra. Paul Kim, DPM, says Integra works well in deeper wounds and decreases the overall wound depth. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kim, DPM, and John Steinberg, DPM)
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    12,324 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Bioengineered alternative tissues, or skin substitutes, can lead to success in patients with wounds that have not responded well to other modalities. Accordingly, our expert panelists offer a closer look at where these products fit into the wound healing armamentarium and share pertinent pearls from their clinical experience with these products. Q: What skin substitutes do you utilize in treating lower extremity wounds? A: Paul Kim, DPM, has had success using Apligraf® (Organogenesis) for more superficial chronic wounds. He cautions practitioners that it may take multipl... continue reading

    4,246 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Get Closure On Wounds A new primary wound closure product may offer your patients comfort and a good cosmetic appearance.      The Steri-Strip™ S Surgical Skin Closure can be helpful in managing low-tension lacerations and surgical incisions, according to the product’s manufacturer 3M. The company cites a recent study that demonstrated that closure of surgical wounds with the non-invasive device was two minutes shorter than with simple running sutures.      Steri-Strip is made of soft polyurethane pads and interlaced polyest... continue reading
    When performing a minimally invasive plantar fasciotomy, one would make a 1 cm vertical incision at the junction of the medial and plantar skin lines.
    By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM
    10,541 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Foot and ankle surgeons have no shortage of choices when it comes to selecting instruments for surgical procedures. Our surgical team has found success in using the Koby line of instruments (OsteoMed) for the treatment of various conditions.    For the last four years, surgeons have found success using Koby instruments for three procedures commonly performed in the foot and ankle. Koby instruments are designed to perform the partial plantar fasciotomy for heel spur syndrome, intermetatarsal ligament decompression of neuroma and release of the gastrocnemius ... continue reading
    One can easily customize the Total Control Orthosis Active to accommodate a variety of conditions, according to Langer.
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    3,475 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    By Jeffrey S. Boberg, DPM, FACFAS, Timothy Oldani, DPM, and Nicholas Martin, DPM
    28,579 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The balance between technology and clinical practice is difficult to obtain. In the past, technology lagged far behind. Innovative thought and technique was stymied by the inability to develop practical instrumentation and implants. In recent years, however, the opposite effect has occurred. New materials and devices have inundated the marketplace. While these devices have been demonstrated to be safe, they are not necessarily any more efficacious and are certainly more costly than existing products.    Indeed, practitioners must be vigilant in evaluating t... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,775 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         I am taking another short break from podiatry, the job I love. Being a small town DPM provides lots of perks but it can also drive a person nuts.      Last Thursday was the day from hell. It started with two difficult surgeries. One was a lady with hallux valgus who was in for her third operation. The first two attempts with me as the surgeon had failed miserably. I asked why she was going to trust me for a third attempt. She told me I knew her expectation better than anyone else. Performing that surgery was like walking the plank.      T... continue reading