Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • August 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 8
    Here one can see contact dermatitis on both feet. This was caused by exposure to allergens in a pair of sandals.
    By Gary L. Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    50,766 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Pruritus is a symptom complex rather than a dermatological condition. It is a very common manifestation of skin diseases described as an itch that makes a person want to scratch. It can be frustrating and cause some patients severe discomfort. Chronic itching can lead to sleeplessness, anxiety, depression and behavioral disorders (especially in young children). Symptoms of pruritus can be a result of skin conditions such as dry skin (xerosis), atopic dermatitis, eczema and contact dermatitis. Pruritus can also present with certain internal disorders or may be due to altered p... continue reading
    By Douglas Richie Jr., DPM
    40,622 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       One of the biggest challenges in a sports medicine practice is deciding when an athlete has sufficiently recovered from an injury and can return to his or her sport. Often, the podiatric physician is under pressure from various sources to return the athlete back to play quickly after injury. More often than not, it is not the athlete who puts the pressure on the doctor. Rather, it is a coach or parent who wants the athlete back in action as soon as possible.    If an athlete returns to play before an injury has adequately healed, there is a risk of re-in... continue reading
    The radiographic findings of a septic nonunion versus an aseptic nonunion may be indistinguishable. Here one can see peri-hardware loosening in both septic and aseptic nonunions.
    By Neal M. Blitz, DPM, FACFAS
    40,279 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Screws, plates, staples, pins and wires are the hardware that the foot and ankle surgeon uses to fixate fractures, fusions and/or osteotomies. An infection involving hardware may jeopardize the bone healing process and is a precarious situation for both the patient and the surgeon. In some situations, the infection may be easily managed yet it can be limb threatening in other situations. Like any infection, early diagnosis is paramount.    Hardware is necessary to stabilize osseous segments until one achieves complete bone healing, a process that typically ... continue reading
    AmeriGel Wound Dressing can treat diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, post-surgical incisions and first- and second-degree burns.
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    3,474 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       When looking for a wound care product that offers antimicrobial properties, provides effective debridement and facilitates a moist wound care environment, podiatrists may want to consider the AmeriGel Wound Dressing. As if these benefits were not enough, one can use the dressing to treat a variety of wounds, including diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, post-surgical incisions and first- and second-degree burns.    R. Daniel Davis, DPM, says the topical medication is an affordable and effective option in his armamentarium.     “(AmeriGe... continue reading
    By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM, and Bruce Werber, DPM
    16,217 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Yes. By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM. While this author has had success with conservative treatment, particularly sclerosing therapy, he emphasizes that a plantar approach to the neurectomy can be effective when surgery is indicated.    Morton’s neuroma is a commonly encountered forefoot pathology that has many different treatment options available for the foot and ankle specialist. What are these options, when does one implement each type of treatment and when does surgical intervention become the best option for the patient?    Before lookin... continue reading

    3,999 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    More Specific Orthotics Do you need orthotics that are specifically tailored to the pathologies of your patients?    You may not need to look any further than three new Pathology Specific Orthoses. ProLab Orthotics/USA says it designed the three new orthotics to meet the specific pathomechanics of each diagnosis. Understanding the pathomechanics of each patient’s diagnosis is essential to ensuring optimum treatment outcomes, according to the company.    With the three new Pathology Specific Orthoses, ProLab now offers a total of 14... continue reading
    Up to 62 percent of Americans with diabetes have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which is one of the most commonly encountered neuropathic pain syndromes in clinical practice.
    By Stephanie Wu, DPM, MSc
    30,627 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Approximately 800,000 new cases of diabetes mellitus are diagnosed each year. The disease affects over 18 million people, approximately 6 percent of the population of the United States.1 Type 2 diabetes, which is typically not diagnosed in patients under age 45, is overwhelmingly the most prevalent of all types of diabetes as it affects nearly 17 million Americans.1 Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes are often not detected until they are severe or until patients seek treatment for related complications.2 Diabetes complications can result in blindness... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,367 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I do not care much for equipment failures. If you take good care of your stuff and do not abuse your equipment and instruments, they should last forever or at least for another three years until I retire. Tell that to my cast saw.    A patient of mine fell off her horse and broke her lateral malleolus. Since the fracture was slightly displaced and the patient was a real macho cowgirl, I felt that a fiberglass walking cast with a couple of extra rolls was the safest way to go. She griped and complained while I was putting on the cast. She said she wouldn’... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    6,112 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    CMS To Begin Competitive Bidding Process For DME    Changes are underway at the federal level to the durable medical equipment (DME) system for Medicare patients and may have an effect on podiatry practices and patient care. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposes a system that will open up the durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies (DMEPOS) system to competitive bidding. As part of the plan, only those suppliers chosen through the bidding will be permitted to supply items to Medicare beneficiaries in product areas cover... continue reading
    By John E. Hahn, DPM, ND
    12,170 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The modern podiatric physician is faced with many challenges when it comes to appropriate patient selection for surgical procedures. Specifically, when it comes to the high-risk patient with diabetes, there are potential challenges that can lead to postoperative complications and potential lawsuits. Indeed, some of these high-risk patients may experience delayed wound healing with no obvious preoperative disease elucidated in the preoperative history, physical and conventional laboratory studies.    Faced with these challenges, the astute podiatric physician ... continue reading