Volume 19 - Issue 8 - August 2006

Feature »

How To Detect And Treat Pruritus

By Gary L. Dockery, DPM, FACFAS | 49711 reads | 0 comments

   Pruritus is a symptom complex rather than a dermatological condition. It is a very common manifestation of skin diseases described as an itch that makes a person want to scratch. It can be frustrating and cause some patients severe discomfort. Chronic itching can lead to sleeplessness, anxiety, depression and behavioral disorders (especially in young children). Symptoms of pruritus can be a result of skin conditions such as dry skin (xerosis), atopic dermatitis, eczema and contact dermatitis. Pruritus can also present with certain internal disorders or may be due to altered p



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Key Insights For Addressing Infected Hardware

By Neal M. Blitz, DPM, FACFAS | 37775 reads | 0 comments

   Screws, plates, staples, pins and wires are the hardware that the foot and ankle surgeon uses to fixate fractures, fusions and/or osteotomies. An infection involving hardware may jeopardize the bone healing process and is a precarious situation for both the patient and the surgeon. In some situations, the infection may be easily managed yet it can be limb threatening in other situations. Like any infection, early diagnosis is paramount.

   Hardware is necessary to stabilize osseous segments until one achieves complete bone healing, a process that typically



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Point-Counterpoint: Intermetatarsal Neuromas: Is Neurectomy The Best Option?

By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM, and Bruce Werber, DPM | 15789 reads | 0 comments

   Yes. By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM. While this author has had success with conservative treatment, particularly sclerosing therapy, he emphasizes that a plantar approach to the neurectomy can be effective when surgery is indicated.

   Morton’s neuroma is a commonly encountered forefoot pathology that has many different treatment options available for the foot and ankle specialist. What are these options, when does one implement each type of treatment and when does surgical intervention become the best option for the patient?

   Before lookin



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Case Studies In Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

By Stephanie Wu, DPM, MSc | 29848 reads | 0 comments

   Approximately 800,000 new cases of diabetes mellitus are diagnosed each year. The disease affects over 18 million people, approximately 6 percent of the population of the United States.1 Type 2 diabetes, which is typically not diagnosed in patients under age 45, is overwhelmingly the most prevalent of all types of diabetes as it affects nearly 17 million Americans.1 Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes are often not detected until they are severe or until patients seek treatment for related complications.2 Diabetes complications can result in blindness



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A Closer Look At Advances In Functional Lab Testing

By John E. Hahn, DPM, ND | 11816 reads | 0 comments

   The modern podiatric physician is faced with many challenges when it comes to appropriate patient selection for surgical procedures. Specifically, when it comes to the high-risk patient with diabetes, there are potential challenges that can lead to postoperative complications and potential lawsuits. Indeed, some of these high-risk patients may experience delayed wound healing with no obvious preoperative disease elucidated in the preoperative history, physical and conventional laboratory studies.

   Faced with these challenges, the astute podiatric physician



Continuing Education »

A Closer Look At Redefining Charcot

By Molly Judge, DPM | 14388 reads | 0 comments

   For foot and ankle specialists, the diagnosis and complete management of neuropathic arthropathy ranks among the most daunting challenges. Currently, one makes the clinical diagnosis when there is a compilation of clinical and radiographic findings suspicious for the condition. The diagnosis relies upon the histopathology to identify the neuropathic joint destruction.

   Once one makes a diagnosis, either definitively or clinically, the treatment approach remains the discretion of the physician. Those best trained for treating this condition rely on the lit



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