Volume 19 - Issue 7 - July 2006

Feature »

A Closer Look At Bioengineered Alternative Tissues

By Paul J. Kim, DPM, Karolina S. Dybowski, BS, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 35895 reads | 0 comments

   The medical management of wounds today is vastly different than wound management was a few years ago. Evidence-based research has provided the practitioner with new technologies that can predictably heal wounds that previously would have threatened limb loss.

   The team approach to complex wound management has been widely embraced and many communities now have referral centers and hospital-based teams that provide multidisciplinary care. With an estimated 20.8 million people in the United States now affected by diabetes and a 15 percent lifetime incidence



Feature »

How To Choose Appropriate Antibiotics For Diabetic Foot Infections

By Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Chad Westphal, DPM | 76972 reads | 0 comments

   Diabetes is clearly an epidemic in this country. According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 18.2 million people in the United States have the disease and 1.3 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Foot infection is the most common reason for lower extremity amputation and leads to billions of dollars a year in hospitalization costs in this country alone.

   Despite becoming almost commonplace, diabetic foot infections are often mismanaged, particularly with regard to antibiotics. The solution to this pro



Feature »

Is There A Role For ESWT In Wound Care?

By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Lt. Col. Alexander Stojadinovic, MD, LCDR Eric Elster, MD, Lt. Col.(P) George Peoples, MD, and Chris E. Attinger, MD | 38898 reads | 0 comments

   Over the past several years, there has been a developing body of knowledge regarding the clinical applications of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). The latest area of clinical investigation for this technology is in the arena of wound healing. Researchers are now studying ESWT as a new approach to wound healing with a particular emphasis on complex soft tissue wounds with and without underlying bone disruption. Hopefully, this article will serve as an introduction to this new topic and we hope the evidence-based data will soon follow as the ongoing clinical trials prog



Feature »

Key Insights On Mapping Wounds With Ultrasound

By Martin Wendelken, DPM, RN, Oscar Alvarez, PhD, Lee Markowitz, DPM, Christopher Comfort, MD, and Linda Waltrous, RN | 8543 reads | 0 comments

   During the last few years, improvements continue to abound in wound care treatments and therapeutics. Specialized dressings, circulation boots, monochromatic infrared therapy, skin substitutes and negative pressure therapy along with variety of vehicles to deliver silver are only a few of the advances. There have also been emerging developments in the diagnostic arena, including thermography, infrared temperature devices, pressure detection mats and devices to test for sensory defects and neuropathy.

   Despite all of these advances, standard wound care (sha



Feature »

How To Develop A Long-Term Plan For Practice Transition

By Steven Peltz, CHBC | 6136 reads | 0 comments

   A detailed assessment of the day-to-day operations, billing and marketing of a podiatric practice can greatly enhance one’s results while planning a personnel transition within the practice.

   With this in mind, I conducted an operational and revenue analysis for a doctor with the objective of helping him to plan for the future of his practice and the location of his practice.

   The analysis has a couple of key sections. First, we reviews the processes in the doctor’s office such as scheduling, patient intake and patient flow. We mo



Continuing Education »

A Guide To Transmetatarsal Amputations In Patients With Diabetes

By Christine Salonga, DPM, and Peter Blume, DPM | 70666 reads | 2 comments

   Lower extremity limb preservation among patients with diabetes continuously challenges the foot and ankle surgeon. With a significant population afflicted by this disease, podiatric physicians often perform amputations, a complication related to diabetes.1-4 The literature shows that pedal amputations occur in 60 percent of all nontraumatic lower extremity amputations with foot related disease as the most frequent cause for hospital admission.4,5

   Transmetatarsal amputations, a common partial foot amputation, succeed with long-term ef