Volume 19 - Issue 7 - July 2006

Feature »

Is There A Role For ESWT In Wound Care?

By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Lt. Col. Alexander Stojadinovic, MD, LCDR Eric Elster, MD, Lt. Col.(P) George Peoples, MD, and Chris E. Attinger, MD | 40675 reads | 0 comments

   Over the past several years, there has been a developing body of knowledge regarding the clinical applications of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). The latest area of clinical investigation for this technology is in the arena of wound healing. Researchers are now studying ESWT as a new approach to wound healing with a particular emphasis on complex soft tissue wounds with and without underlying bone disruption. Hopefully, this article will serve as an introduction to this new topic and we hope the evidence-based data will soon follow as the ongoing clinical trials prog



Feature »

Key Insights On Mapping Wounds With Ultrasound

By Martin Wendelken, DPM, RN, Oscar Alvarez, PhD, Lee Markowitz, DPM, Christopher Comfort, MD, and Linda Waltrous, RN | 9172 reads | 0 comments

   During the last few years, improvements continue to abound in wound care treatments and therapeutics. Specialized dressings, circulation boots, monochromatic infrared therapy, skin substitutes and negative pressure therapy along with variety of vehicles to deliver silver are only a few of the advances. There have also been emerging developments in the diagnostic arena, including thermography, infrared temperature devices, pressure detection mats and devices to test for sensory defects and neuropathy.

   Despite all of these advances, standard wound care (sha



Feature »

How To Develop A Long-Term Plan For Practice Transition

By Steven Peltz, CHBC | 6686 reads | 0 comments

   A detailed assessment of the day-to-day operations, billing and marketing of a podiatric practice can greatly enhance one’s results while planning a personnel transition within the practice.

   With this in mind, I conducted an operational and revenue analysis for a doctor with the objective of helping him to plan for the future of his practice and the location of his practice.

   The analysis has a couple of key sections. First, we reviews the processes in the doctor’s office such as scheduling, patient intake and patient flow. We mo



Continuing Education »

A Guide To Transmetatarsal Amputations In Patients With Diabetes

By Christine Salonga, DPM, and Peter Blume, DPM | 76450 reads | 2 comments

   Lower extremity limb preservation among patients with diabetes continuously challenges the foot and ankle surgeon. With a significant population afflicted by this disease, podiatric physicians often perform amputations, a complication related to diabetes.1-4 The literature shows that pedal amputations occur in 60 percent of all nontraumatic lower extremity amputations with foot related disease as the most frequent cause for hospital admission.4,5

   Transmetatarsal amputations, a common partial foot amputation, succeed with long-term ef



Treatment Dilemmas »

A Guide To Treating Ankle Sprains From Start To Finish

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 90479 reads | 0 comments

   An ankle sprain can be a debilitating and often difficult problem to overcome. In most cases, patients do not seek treatment immediately and/or the treatment offered is not up to par. I have spent a great deal of time at the local family practice and emergency room offices explaining how the treatment they offered their patients at the initial visits was not aggressive enough. Indeed, when initial treatment for ankle sprains is not aggressive enough, it may result in chronic instability and the need for surgery.

   Accordingly, let us take a closer look at t



New Products »

New Products

3281 reads | 0 comments

Treating Wounds From Every Angle

Patients can now use two tested wound care products in a spray emulsion form.

   Accuzyme and Panafil are perfect for elderly patients, particularly those who suffer from arthritis, according to Healthpoint, the manufacturer of both products. The spray emulsion format does not require direct contact from the patient or person applying the enzymatic debridement products. Healthpoint says the “no touch” application may reduce the chance of infection and help prevent disturbing the wound bed.

   Healthp