Volume 19 - Issue 7 - July 2006

News and Trends »

Study: Infection Dramatically Raises Risk Of Amputation, Hospitalization

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 9189 reads | 0 comments

   It is no secret that foot infections can lead to a range of complications up to and including lower extremity amputation. However, a recent study has demonstrated a dramatically higher risk of both amputation and hospitalization in diabetes patients who develop foot infections as opposed to those without infection. The authors say this is the first prospective study to report the incidence of foot infections in a defined population as well as the risk factors for infection.

   The study, published in a recent issue of Diabetes Care, found that patient



Editor's Perspective »

Emphasizing The Need For Accelerated Wound Healing

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 2096 reads | 0 comments

   The importance of resolving infections and facilitating quicker wound healing is commonly understood when it comes to managing lower extremity ulcerations in patients with diabetes. Indeed, a recent study in Diabetes Care emphasizes just how important those treatment goals are in the diabetic population.

   According to the study, those who have a diabetic foot infection have over a 150 times greater risk of amputation and a 55.7 times increased risk of hospitalization than those without infection (see page 10, “News and Trends”).

  &



Diabetes Watch »

Can A Gastric Bypass Procedure Have A Positive Impact On Diabetes?

By Chad Friedman, DPM, and Doug Pacaccio, DPM | 5941 reads | 0 comments

   The complications stemming from obesity have been well documented. In recent years, the popularity of the gastric bypass procedure has increased as a method of combating obesity. As the literature shows, gastric bypass has a positive effect on diabetes itself as well as diabetic neuropathy. However, the surgery is not without its risks and the entire health care team must be aware of both the benefits and downsides.

   According to data from the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, two-thirds of the United States population is overwe



Wound Care Q&A »

Key Insights On Treating Burn Wounds In The Lower Extremity

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 17085 reads | 0 comments

   Treating partial- and full-thickness burns present unique challenges for podiatrists. Although one may need to refer burns to a burn center, there are measures DPMs can take to treat burns and help relieve the patient’s pain. Accordingly, these expert panelists discuss their preferred modalities for wounds, methods of management and their thoughts on the role of bioengineered tissues and oral antibiotics.

   Q: What is your initial management of lower extremity burn wounds as far as partial-thickness (second degree) versus full-thickness (third degree)



Surgical Pearls »

Transverse Z-Osteotomy: Is It A Viable Adjunctive Option For Hallux Limitus?

By Daniel K. Lee, DPM, and Gregory E. Tilley, DPM | 15327 reads | 0 comments

   There have been many surgical treatment modalities described in the podiatric and orthopedic literature for the correction of hallux limitus.1-5 Since the Regnauld procedure was introduced in 1968, surgeons have used it in the treatment of a pathologically long proximal phalanx and hallux limitus.6 However, since its development, this procedure has been characterized as a technically challenging procedure for the treatment of hallux limitus with or without moderate degenerative arthritis.7-10

   In 1995, Kissel, et. al., and



Feature »

A Closer Look At Bioengineered Alternative Tissues

By Paul J. Kim, DPM, Karolina S. Dybowski, BS, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 37440 reads | 0 comments

   The medical management of wounds today is vastly different than wound management was a few years ago. Evidence-based research has provided the practitioner with new technologies that can predictably heal wounds that previously would have threatened limb loss.

   The team approach to complex wound management has been widely embraced and many communities now have referral centers and hospital-based teams that provide multidisciplinary care. With an estimated 20.8 million people in the United States now affected by diabetes and a 15 percent lifetime incidence