Volume 19 - Issue 7 - July 2006

Wound Care Q&A »

Key Insights On Treating Burn Wounds In The Lower Extremity

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 17070 reads | 0 comments

   Treating partial- and full-thickness burns present unique challenges for podiatrists. Although one may need to refer burns to a burn center, there are measures DPMs can take to treat burns and help relieve the patient’s pain. Accordingly, these expert panelists discuss their preferred modalities for wounds, methods of management and their thoughts on the role of bioengineered tissues and oral antibiotics.

   Q: What is your initial management of lower extremity burn wounds as far as partial-thickness (second degree) versus full-thickness (third degree)



Surgical Pearls »

Transverse Z-Osteotomy: Is It A Viable Adjunctive Option For Hallux Limitus?

By Daniel K. Lee, DPM, and Gregory E. Tilley, DPM | 15304 reads | 0 comments

   There have been many surgical treatment modalities described in the podiatric and orthopedic literature for the correction of hallux limitus.1-5 Since the Regnauld procedure was introduced in 1968, surgeons have used it in the treatment of a pathologically long proximal phalanx and hallux limitus.6 However, since its development, this procedure has been characterized as a technically challenging procedure for the treatment of hallux limitus with or without moderate degenerative arthritis.7-10

   In 1995, Kissel, et. al., and



Feature »

A Closer Look At Bioengineered Alternative Tissues

By Paul J. Kim, DPM, Karolina S. Dybowski, BS, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 37397 reads | 0 comments

   The medical management of wounds today is vastly different than wound management was a few years ago. Evidence-based research has provided the practitioner with new technologies that can predictably heal wounds that previously would have threatened limb loss.

   The team approach to complex wound management has been widely embraced and many communities now have referral centers and hospital-based teams that provide multidisciplinary care. With an estimated 20.8 million people in the United States now affected by diabetes and a 15 percent lifetime incidence



Feature »

How To Choose Appropriate Antibiotics For Diabetic Foot Infections

By Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Chad Westphal, DPM | 79637 reads | 0 comments

   Diabetes is clearly an epidemic in this country. According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 18.2 million people in the United States have the disease and 1.3 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Foot infection is the most common reason for lower extremity amputation and leads to billions of dollars a year in hospitalization costs in this country alone.

   Despite becoming almost commonplace, diabetic foot infections are often mismanaged, particularly with regard to antibiotics. The solution to this pro



Feature »

Is There A Role For ESWT In Wound Care?

By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Lt. Col. Alexander Stojadinovic, MD, LCDR Eric Elster, MD, Lt. Col.(P) George Peoples, MD, and Chris E. Attinger, MD | 39907 reads | 0 comments

   Over the past several years, there has been a developing body of knowledge regarding the clinical applications of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). The latest area of clinical investigation for this technology is in the arena of wound healing. Researchers are now studying ESWT as a new approach to wound healing with a particular emphasis on complex soft tissue wounds with and without underlying bone disruption. Hopefully, this article will serve as an introduction to this new topic and we hope the evidence-based data will soon follow as the ongoing clinical trials prog



Feature »

Key Insights On Mapping Wounds With Ultrasound

By Martin Wendelken, DPM, RN, Oscar Alvarez, PhD, Lee Markowitz, DPM, Christopher Comfort, MD, and Linda Waltrous, RN | 8893 reads | 0 comments

   During the last few years, improvements continue to abound in wound care treatments and therapeutics. Specialized dressings, circulation boots, monochromatic infrared therapy, skin substitutes and negative pressure therapy along with variety of vehicles to deliver silver are only a few of the advances. There have also been emerging developments in the diagnostic arena, including thermography, infrared temperature devices, pressure detection mats and devices to test for sensory defects and neuropathy.

   Despite all of these advances, standard wound care (sha



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