Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • July 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 7
    Here is a full-thickness grease burn suffered by a 36-year-old woman. Note the waxy white coloring due to the depth of the burn. (Photo courtesy of Alan J. Cantor, DPM)
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    17,431 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Treating partial- and full-thickness burns present unique challenges for podiatrists. Although one may need to refer burns to a burn center, there are measures DPMs can take to treat burns and help relieve the patient’s pain. Accordingly, these expert panelists discuss their preferred modalities for wounds, methods of management and their thoughts on the role of bioengineered tissues and oral antibiotics.    Q: What is your initial management of lower extremity burn wounds as far as partial-thickness (second degree) versus full-thickness (third degree)... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    91,414 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       An ankle sprain can be a debilitating and often difficult problem to overcome. In most cases, patients do not seek treatment immediately and/or the treatment offered is not up to par. I have spent a great deal of time at the local family practice and emergency room offices explaining how the treatment they offered their patients at the initial visits was not aggressive enough. Indeed, when initial treatment for ankle sprains is not aggressive enough, it may result in chronic instability and the need for surgery.    Accordingly, let us take a closer look at t... continue reading
    Here one can see degenerative and erosive changes to the first metatarsal head. The transverse Z-osteotomy is one of many treatments for hallux limitus. (Photo courtesy of Harold Schoenhaus, DPM)
    By Daniel K. Lee, DPM, and Gregory E. Tilley, DPM
    15,838 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       There have been many surgical treatment modalities described in the podiatric and orthopedic literature for the correction of hallux limitus.1-5 Since the Regnauld procedure was introduced in 1968, surgeons have used it in the treatment of a pathologically long proximal phalanx and hallux limitus.6 However, since its development, this procedure has been characterized as a technically challenging procedure for the treatment of hallux limitus with or without moderate degenerative arthritis.7-10    In 1995, Kissel, et. al., and... continue reading

    3,299 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Treating Wounds From Every Angle Patients can now use two tested wound care products in a spray emulsion form.    Accuzyme and Panafil are perfect for elderly patients, particularly those who suffer from arthritis, according to Healthpoint, the manufacturer of both products. The spray emulsion format does not require direct contact from the patient or person applying the enzymatic debridement products. Healthpoint says the “no touch” application may reduce the chance of infection and help prevent disturbing the wound bed.    Healthp... continue reading
    Here one can see a histological crosssection of the human plantar skin at six times magnification using hematoxylin and eosin staining techniques. (Photo courtesy of Linda Walters, PhD)
    By Paul J. Kim, DPM, Karolina S. Dybowski, BS, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    38,455 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The medical management of wounds today is vastly different than wound management was a few years ago. Evidence-based research has provided the practitioner with new technologies that can predictably heal wounds that previously would have threatened limb loss.    The team approach to complex wound management has been widely embraced and many communities now have referral centers and hospital-based teams that provide multidisciplinary care. With an estimated 20.8 million people in the United States now affected by diabetes and a 15 percent lifetime incidence ... continue reading
    Interphlex Flexible Stabilization Rods are indicated for hammertoe correction. They maintain toe length by stabilizing and preserving the joint space, notes the manufacturer OsteoMed.
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    3,945 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       While many surgeons may opt for traditional arthroplasty, those who are looking for improved stability may want to consider the use of Interphlex Flexible Stabilization Rods.    Comprised of 80-durometer medical grade silicone, the Interphlex rods help maintain toe length by stabilizing and preserving the joint space, according to the product’s manufacturer OsteoMed, Inc. The company notes the stiffness of the rods addresses toe migration while the spacer provides stability of the joint space.    OsteoMed says the Interphlex rods are indi... continue reading
    Here one can see multiple ischemic ulcers on the dorsal aspect of the left foot. Skin mottling is present along with epidermolysis.
    By Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Chad Westphal, DPM
    81,838 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Diabetes is clearly an epidemic in this country. According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 18.2 million people in the United States have the disease and 1.3 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Foot infection is the most common reason for lower extremity amputation and leads to billions of dollars a year in hospitalization costs in this country alone.    Despite becoming almost commonplace, diabetic foot infections are often mismanaged, particularly with regard to antibiotics. The solution to this pro... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,429 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I always seem to have a small following of patients who have fallen through the cracks of health insurance coverage. My practice policy is “No Financial Barriers to Care.” In other words, we take care of them and provide care according to their needs.    Dean was a perfect example of a patient falling through the cracks. He presented in my office seven years ago with a crushed foot. He was trying to move a bull into a corral and a beast that weighed around 800 pounds stepped on his left foot.    Dean was 63 years old and had stopped wor... continue reading
    This photo shows the forefoot of a 47-year-old male patient who was injured by a rotating ship propeller. The photo was taken just before the first shockwave treatment.
    By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Lt. Col. Alexander Stojadinovic, MD, LCDR Eric Elster, MD, Lt. Col.(P) George Peoples, MD, and Chris E. Attinger, MD
    40,760 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Over the past several years, there has been a developing body of knowledge regarding the clinical applications of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). The latest area of clinical investigation for this technology is in the arena of wound healing. Researchers are now studying ESWT as a new approach to wound healing with a particular emphasis on complex soft tissue wounds with and without underlying bone disruption. Hopefully, this article will serve as an introduction to this new topic and we hope the evidence-based data will soon follow as the ongoing clinical trials prog... continue reading
    Here is an acute deep space abscess in a patient who has diabetes. This infection will likely require a combination of aggressive surgical management and systemic antibiotic agents. (Photo courtesy of Ann Anderson, DPM, and John Steinberg, DPM)
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    9,534 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       It is no secret that foot infections can lead to a range of complications up to and including lower extremity amputation. However, a recent study has demonstrated a dramatically higher risk of both amputation and hospitalization in diabetes patients who develop foot infections as opposed to those without infection. The authors say this is the first prospective study to report the incidence of foot infections in a defined population as well as the risk factors for infection.    The study, published in a recent issue of Diabetes Care, found that patient... continue reading